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Encyclopedia > Canadian Heraldic Authority
Badge of the Canadian Heraldic Authority
Badge of the Canadian Heraldic Authority

The Canadian Heraldic Authority is an agency of the Government of Canada responsible for heraldry in Canada. The Authority is responsible for the creation and granting of new coats of arms (armorial bearings), flags and badges for Canadian citizens and corporate bodies. The Authority also registers existing armorial bearings, which have been granted by other recognized heraldic authorities, approves military badges, flags and other insignia of the Canadian Armed Forces, registers genealogical information related to the inheritance of arms, and provides information on correct heraldic practices. It is the Canadian counterpart of the College of Arms, and the Court of the Lord Lyon. Image File history File links Badge of the Canadian Heraldric Authroity. ... Image File history File links Badge of the Canadian Heraldric Authroity. ... System of government Canada is a constitutional monarchy as a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... French Tricolore flag A flag is a piece of cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually intended for signaling or identification. ... Heraldic badges were common in the Middle Ages particularly in England. ... Insignia (from latin insigne: emblem, symbol) is a symbol or token of personal power, status or office, or of an offical body of government or jurisdiction. ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (Fr: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the combined branches of the military of Canada. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... The Colleges own coat of arms was granted in 1484. ... The Court of the Lord Lyon, also know as Lyon Court, is the institution which regulates heraldry in Scotland. ...

Contents


History

Before the creation of the Canadian Heraldic Authority, Canadians wishing to obtain a legally granted coat of arms had to apply to one of the two official heraldic offices in the United Kingdom: either the College of Arms in London, or if of Scottish descent, to the Court of the Lord Lyon in Edinburgh. This process was quite lengthy. In addition, the heralds of the College of Arms and the Court of the Lord Lyon could sometimes be unfamiliar with Canadian history and symbols, thus many Canadians who had an interest in heraldry wanted an office, under the control of the Governor General, which would offer armorial bearings designed by and for Canadians. St. ... Scottish can refer to: (as an adjective) things to do with Scotland (see also Scotch) (as a noun) the Scottish people. ... It has been suggested that Areas of Edinburgh be merged into this article or section. ... A herald was originally a messenger sent by a king or nobleman to convey a message or proclamation. ...


On June 4, 1988, then Governor General Jeanne Sauvé authorized the creation of the Canadian Heraldic Authority. This was made possible by new letters patent, signed by Queen Elizabeth II on the advice of Her Canadian Privy Council, which authorized "the Governor General of Canada to exercise or provide for the exercise of all powers and authorities lawfully belonging to Us as Queen of Canada in respect of the granting of armorial bearings in Canada". As a result Canada became the first Commonwealth nation to have its own heraldic office. [1] June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneur général or Gouverneure générale) is the representative of the Canadian monarch. ... The Right Honourable Jeanne Mathilde Sauvé, PC , CC , CMM , CD (née Benoit) (April 26, 1922 – January 26, 1993) was a Canadian journalist, politician and stateswoman. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal document which is an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as a corporation. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The Queens Privy Council for Canada is the ceremonial council of advisors to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by her Canada for life on the advice of the Prime Minister. ... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is an association of independent sovereign states, most of which are former colonies once governed by the United Kingdom as part of the British Empire. ...


Structure

Authority structure flow chart (Click to expand)
Authority structure flow chart (Click to expand)

The Authority is located at Rideau Hall, the residence of the Governor General. The Governor General, since he or she is the personal representative of the Canadian monarch, is considered the highest authority in Canadian heraldry. Below the Governor General is the Herald Chancellor, a position held by the Secretary of the Governor General. The Authority is currently organized in an office called the Chancellery of Honours, the same office that issues Canadian orders and decoration, such as the Order of Canada. The Deputy Secretary that administers the Chancellery of Honours is also the Deputy Herald Chancellor. The Chief Herald of Canada is the Director of Heraldry and the senior heraldic professional inside the Authority. Image File history File links Flowchart of the Canadian Heraldic Authority. ... Image File history File links Flowchart of the Canadian Heraldic Authority. ... Image File history File links Large version of the arms of Adrienne Clarkson Obtained from the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Large version of the arms of Adrienne Clarkson Obtained from the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneur général or Gouverneure générale) is the representative of the Canadian monarch. ... Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Louise Clarkson, CC, CMM, COM, CD (born February 10, 1939) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... Rideau Hall is the official residence of the Governor General of Canada, and is the place of residence of the Monarch of Canada when visiting Ottawa. ... The Order of Canada is Canadas highest civilian honour, awarded to those who adhere to the Orders motto Desiderantes meliorem patriam meaning desiring a better country. ...


The Authority itself is headed by the Chief Herald of Canada, a position that has been held by Robert D. Watt ever since its inception in 1988. The Chief Herald's job is to oversee and direct the operations of the CHA and is the main official to grant arms. However, the Governor General has the authority to grant arms directly.


Below the Chief Herald are the Heralds of Arms, full time workers at the Authority and considered part of the Public Service of Canada. The names of the various offices were taken from significant rivers located in Canada. Though the titles are territorial designations, as per heraldic tradition, each herald serves the entire country. Each is assigned a badge of office. Some positions may remain vacant for a substantial period of time, until a suitable replacement is found. The Heralds of Arms are:

  • The Saint-Laurent Herald who is the Registrar of the Authority, which mainly deals with records. Some of the records that the Saint-Laurent Herald maintains is the Public Register of Arms and the Flags and Badges of Canada. This herald is also the custodian of the Authority's seal. The title is currently held by Claire Boudreau, since 2000.
  • The Fraser Herald who is the Principal Artist of the Authority, which oversees the drawings for each arms that are granted. Since 1989, Cathy Bursey-Sabourin has held the title.
  • The Saguenay Herald who is the Assistant Registrar of the Authority, thus he or she must work with the Saint-Laurent Herald, the Registrar of the Authority. Both the Saguenay and the Saint-Laurent heralds have specific tasks to do, such as making the grant and registration documents in both English and French. Since 2000, the title has been held by Bruce Patterson.
  • The Athabaska and Assiniboine Heralds who act as assistants to the above mentioned heralds.


Badges of office of the Officers and Heralds of Arms

Honorary Positions

The Authority also allows for two honorary positions: Heralds Emeritus and Heralds Extraordinary. Heralds Emeritus is reserved for heralds who have retired, but have made a significant contribution to heraldry. Heralds Extraordinary is an honorary position for those who made notable contributions to heraldry. Both Emerituses and Extraordinares can be enlisted by the Authority to perform work for them. Each honorary position grants the individual with a badge and a title also based on Canadian rivers. As of 2005, there is one Heralds Emeritus, the Outaouais Herald Emeritus (Auguste Vachon) and three Heralds Extraordinary: Dauphin Herald Extraordinary (Robert Pichette), Niagara Herald Extraordinary (Gordon Macpherson) and Cowichan Herald Extraordinary (Graham Anderson). [2] A professor is a senior teacher and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...



Badges of office of the Heralds Emeritus and Extraordinary

Grant process

Letters patent Option I
Letters patent Option I

In order to request either a coat of arms, flags and or badges, a letter must be addressed to the Chief Herald of Canada. The letter must clearly ask "to receive armorial bearings from the Canadian Crown under the powers exercised by the Governor General." If an individual is filing the request, called a petition, he or she must include information about their background. This includes proof of Canadian citizenship and a biographical sketch that details employment, education and any volunteer or community service. References and a form will also be included. All information received will be kept in accordance to the Privacy Act. If a corporation is filing the request, a brief history of the company and proof of their incorporation in Canada is included. Financial reports and a copy of the corporation's governing body resolution seeking a grant of arms will also be included in the request. Corporations are defined, but not limited to, municipalities, societies, associations and institutions. Image File history File links Letters Patent for the town of Leduc Alberta. ... Image File history File links Letters Patent for the town of Leduc Alberta. ...

Letters patent Option II
Letters patent Option II

Upon the assessment by the Chief Herald of Canada, he or she can approve or reject the petition. If the petition is approved by the Chief Herald, a statement of approval called a warrant is issued and signed by the Herald Chancellor or the Deputy Herald Chancellor. Upon approval, the petition is sent to one of the heralds that work with the Authority and the arms will be created. This will begin the process of the creation of a written description, the first step of three to granting arms. The herald will work with the petitioner to discuss the elements that will be included in the coat of arms, however, the elements must follow the rules of heraldry. The Chief of Herald will approve the written description, and once he or she does so, the petitioner must also approve it. The second step of the process is to create a preliminary design. The petitioner will sign a contract with an artist at the Authority, and the artist in turn will create the design. The Fraser Herald, serving as the Authority's principal artist, will review the design and if approved, will send it to the Chief Herald. Upon the approval of the Chief Herald, the design will be sent to the petitioner for his or her approval. The final step is to prepare the grant document, called letters patent. The petitioner will decide on the format of the letter patent, which includes a drawing of the armorial bearings and the accompanying legal text and explanation of the symbolism of the bearings. While the text will be in both English and French, the petitioner has the option to decide which text will be placed on the left side of the letters patent. Image File history File links An example of Option 2 of the letters patent. ... Image File history File links An example of Option 2 of the letters patent. ...


Completed grant documents are recorded in the Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada, and the notice of the grant is published in the Canada Gazette. In the Canada Gazette, the notices of the granting of armorial bearings will be announced in Part I under the section "Government House." The Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada is divided up in volumes, with each volume being reserved for each serving Governor General since 1988. Volume I, from 1988-1990, is for arms granted during the term of Jeanne Sauvé, Volume II, from 1990-1995, is reserved for Ramon Hnatyshyn and Volume III is reserved for Roméo LeBlanc, who served from 1995 until 1999. The current Governor General, Adrienne Clarkson, has her grants entered into Volume IV. [3] Requests for registrations of existing arms also take the form of a "petition", as described above. Registration documents are recorded in the Public Register, and the notice of the registration is published in the Gazette. If the petitioner so desires, their design can be published in the Trade Marks Journal. That can be arranged through the offices of the Authority, but a separate fee is required which is paid to the Registrar of Trade Marks. The Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada contains the heraldic emblems (armorial bearings) that have been granted, registered, approved or confirmed by the Canadian Heraldic Authority since its inception on June 4, 1988. ... The Canada Gazette is an official publication by the government of Canada that publishes all laws and Orders in Council issued by the government. ... The Right Honourable Ramon John Ray Hnatyshyn PC, CC (March 16, 1934 - December 18, 2002) was Canadas twenty-fourth governor general, serving from 1990 to 1995. ... The Right Honourable Roméo LeBlanc PC, CC, CMM, CD (born December 18, 1927 in Memramcook, New Brunswick) is a former Governor General of Canada. ...


There are no set requirements for new armorial bearings to be granted. In general though, eligibility depends upon holding a civil or military commission, a respected university degree or professional qualification, or having achieved some measure of distinction in a field beneficial to society. For example, those who have been awarded the Order of Canada can ask the Chief Herald to grant them arms. However, Companions of the Order of Canada can ask the Chief Herald to also grant them the use of supporters, or the use of animals or humans to hold up the shield in the coat of arms. [4] However, any Canadian citizens or corporations can ask for a petition to ask for a grant for armorial bearings.


The Government of Canada requires that the above processes be financed by the "petitioner", that is the person requesting the grant or registration of arms, who pays the fees associated with the request and grant/registration. The processing fee for all petitioners is $435 CAD (plus GST), with the cost of one preliminary design ranging from $200 to $1,000. The cost of the final design, as illustrated on the letters patent, ranges from $900 to $3,500. It should be noted that the petitioner does not "buy" a coat of arms: the arms themselves are freely given to qualified individuals, but fees must be paid to the heralds and artists for the services rendered. The Canadian dollar, CAD or C$, is the unit of currency of Canada. ... The Canadian Goods and Services Tax or GST (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level sales tax introduced in Canada in 1991. ...


The average time that is required to complete a grant is about 12 to 14 months, however, this is the time that it takes after the warrant has been signed. If the discussion about the designs continue for a long period of time or Authority cannot spare the resources due to the number of petitions received, the process can take longer.


The Authority's armorial bearings

The full armorial bearings of the Canadian Heraldic Authority
The full armorial bearings of the Canadian Heraldic Authority

The full armorial bearings, or the complete coat of arms, of the Canadian Heraldic Authority incorporate aboriginal symbolism, as seen in the mythical raven-bears, as well as traditional Canadian colours of red and white, which were made official by King George V in 1921. [5] Image File history File links The full armorial bearings (complete coat of arms in more common language) of the Canadian Heraldic Authority incoporate aboriginal symbolism, as seen in the mythical raven-bears, as well as traditional Canadian colours (red and white). ... Image File history File links The full armorial bearings (complete coat of arms in more common language) of the Canadian Heraldic Authority incoporate aboriginal symbolism, as seen in the mythical raven-bears, as well as traditional Canadian colours (red and white). ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the visible spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... King George V King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the House... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The current arms were confirmed in a warrant by the Governor General on January 15, 1994. This was done in honour of the Authority's fifth anniversary, which was celebrated in 1993. The raven-bears, a new heraldic beast which combined several creatures that are important to the aboriginal symbolism, were proposed by the heralds in honour of the United Nation's International Year of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, also occurring in 1993. The raven-bears are standing on an outcrop of what is known as the Canadian Shield, a geological formation which the Authority foundation is based on. The Canadian Shield is formed by rocks, which are covered in red colored maple leaves and by golden maple seeds. The motto that was chosen, HONORENTUR PATRIAM HONORANTES, is Latin for “Let those honouring the country be honoured.” This was chosen since heraldry, by nature, is an honour that is granted by the Crown and that granting arms is a integral part of the Canadian honours system. [6] The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneur général or Gouverneure générale) is the representative of the Canadian monarch. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield is a large craton in eastern and central Canada and adjacent portions of the United States, composed of bare rock dating to the Precambrian Era (between 4. ... The MAPLE dedicated isotope-production facility is a current project jointly undertaken by AECL and MDS Nordion. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Queen of Canada, Queen Elizabeth II The Canadian honours system has developed as a unique entity since the centennial of Canadian Confederation in 1967 when the first distinctly Canadian honour, the Order of Canada was created. ...


The blazon, or technical description in heraldic language, of the full armorial bearings is: This is an article about Heraldry. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ...

  • Arms: Argent on a maple leaf Gules an escutcheon Argent;
  • Crest: Upon a helmet mantled Gules doubled Argent within a wreath of these colours a lion passant guardant Or Royally Crowned Proper its dexter forepaw resting on an escutcheon Argent charged with a maple leaf Gules;
  • Motto: HONORENTUR PATRIAM HONORANTES;
  • Supporters: On a representation of an outcrop of the Canadian Shield proper strewn with maple leaves Gules and maple seeds Or two raven-bears Gules over Argent wings elevated Gules beaked and armed Or.

A small bearing, called the Arms and Crest, is used on the seal of the Authority and on the letters patent that grant and register armorial bearings. The arms and crest combines the symbols of authority of the Vice-Regal and about its activity in Canada. The crest is a modification of the Royal Crest of Canada: it has lion, wearing a crown, holding a white shield containing a red maple leaf. This is supposed to symbolize the Governor General's power to grant armorial bearings to Canadians. In the Royal Crest of Canada, the lion is holding a maple leaf. The shield is white, containing a red maple, with a small white shield in the middle of the maple leaf. This is showing the Authority's work to promote the creation and recording of armorial bearings for Canadians. A wreath behind the arms is composed of red maple leaves bound with gold straps. In heraldry, tinctures are the colours used to blazon a coat of arms. ... In heraldry, tinctures are the colours used to blazon a coat of arms. ... In heraldry, tinctures are the colours used to blazon a coat of arms. ...


See also

Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... The Colleges own coat of arms was granted in 1484. ... The Court of the Lord Lyon, also know as Lyon Court, is the institution which regulates heraldry in Scotland. ... Heraldic badges were common in the Middle Ages particularly in England. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal document which is an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as a corporation. ...

References

  1. ^  History of the Authority
  2. ^  Officers of the Authority
  3. ^  Description of the Public Register of Arms
  4. ^  Order of Canada Constitution (English)
  5. ^  Canadian Heritage Department
  6. ^  Armorial Bearings of the Authority

External links

  • Canadian Heraldic Authority
    • The Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada
  • Royal Heraldry Society of Canada

  Results from FactBites:
 
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Canadian Heraldic Authority at AllExperts (2292 words)
The Authority is responsible for the creation and granting of new coats of arms (armorial bearings), flags and badges for Canadian citizens, permanent residents and corporate bodies.
The CHA is the Canadian counterpart of the College of Arms in London, and the Court of the Lord Lyon in Scotland and is well-known for its innovative designs, many incorporating First Nations symbolism, and (along with the Bureau of Heraldry in South Africa) for modernizing heraldic practices concerning women.
The shield and crest of the Canadian Heraldic Authority
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