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Encyclopedia > Canadian Forces Military Police

The Canadian Forces Military Police provide military police services to the Canadian Forces. Image File history File links Mplogo_b. ... It has been suggested that Gendarmerie be merged into this article or section. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the combined armed forces of Canada. ...


Canadian Military Police are unusual in that they are classified as Peace Officers in terms of the Canadian Criminal Code, which gives them the same powers as civilian police. They have the power to arrest anyone who is subjected to the Code of Service Discipline, regardless of position or rank. They cannot arrest non-members under the National Defence Act but may do so at the request of Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Commissioner of Corrections In the broad sense a peace officer is any public sector person charged to uphold the peace. ... The Canadian Criminal Code (formal title An Act respecting the Criminal Law) is the codification of most of the criminal offences and procedure in Canada. ... In the Cabinet of Canada, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for overseeing the federal governments domestic security department, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. ... Commissioner is the highest rank of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). ... Correctional Service of Canada is a Canadian government agency of public safety responsible for the incarceration and rehabilitation of convicted criminal offenders in Canada. ...


Members of the CF are automatically classified as Peace Officer when they are engaging in "in the course of any military operation, training or administration, either as a result of a specific order or established military custom or practice". But this power is strictly limited unlike the Military Police themseleves[1] In the broad sense a peace officer is any public sector person charged to uphold the peace. ...


The official Branch motto is Securitas, Latin for "Securing". Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


The Military Police are jokingly referred to as "The Meatheads" by other members of the Canadian Forces, likely poking fun at the branch's red berets.

Contents

History

During the early 1960s, the Canadian Government was exploring the possibility of amalgamating the three military Services into a single, unified command structure. The Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Air Force became the Sea, Land, and Air Elements of the Canadian Forces. Individual Corps and Services common to the three elements, such as Signals, Medical, Ordnance and Chaplains, were unified and designated as personnel branches. New uniforms were authorized, and the rank structure unified. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... System of government Canada is a constitutional monarchy as a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... In a military context, the chain of command is the line of authority and responsibility along which orders are passed. ... For history after 1968, see Canadian Forces Maritime Command The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the navy of Canada from 1911 until 1968 when the three Canadian armed services were unified to form the Canadian Forces. ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) was the air force of Canada from 1924 until 1968 when the three branches of the Canadian military were merged into the Canadian Forces. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the combined armed forces of Canada. ... A corps (plural same as singular; a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: (cor), but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or... Services are: plural of service Tertiary sector of industry IRC services Web services the name of a first-class cricket team in India This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Military communications, or Signals, is a field of military activities, tactics and equipment dealing with communications. ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that are used to treat patients. ... A chaplain is a priest or military unit, a private chapel, a ship, a prison, a hospital, a parliament and so on. ... Personnel branch, in the Canadian Forces (CF), refers to a grouping of related military occupations. ... A uniform is a set of standard clothing worn by members of an organisation whilst participating in that organisations activity. ...


Single Service Military Police organizations

Prior to this unification, military security and police functions were performed differently by each arm of service.


The Army had divided the responsibility for security between the Canadian Provost Corps (C Pro C) and the Canadian Intelligence Corps (C Int C). Field inquiries were conducted by the security sections of the C Int C, whilst the police functions of the C Pro C involved the provision and supervision of guards, the operation of Service Detention Barracks, and the investigation of service (disciplinary) and criminal offences. The Canadian Provost Corps (C Pro C) was the military police corps of the Canadian Army prior to its amalgamation into the Canadian Forces in 1968. ... The Canadian Intelligence Corps (C INT C) was an administrative corps of the Canadian Army. ...


The Royal Canadian Air Force Police (AFP) had the dual tasks of performing both police and security duties and were under the command of the base on which they served. The Royal Canadian Air Force Police was responsible for military police functions for the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). ...


Security in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was the responsibility of the Assistant Director Naval Intelligence, who reported to the Director of Naval Headquarters. The navy had no police organization comparable to the C Pro C or the AFP, but relied on the Dockyard Police, Corps of Commissionaires, local civil police and shore patrols to maintain security of establishments and to maintain discipline.


Amalgamation

All police and security elements of the Canadian Forces were initially amalgamated when the Directorate of Security was formed during October 1964 at Canadian Forces Headquarters. When the functional command structure was introduced in April 1966, the security staffs and Provost Marshals in existing single service command structures were eliminated, command and base security officers were appointed at the new HQs, and the investigative elements of the Services were joined into a single organisation called the Special Investigative Unit (SIU). 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


To achieve a common approach within the Canadian Forces, security and police functions were regrouped into three categories - personnel security, police and custody, and security of information and materiel. The five trades that had previous existed were replaced by a single trade of Military Police. This also provided standards for the training required by all non-commissioned officers in the police and security field. A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


In June 1966, Major General Turcot was instructed to examine the role, organisation and responsibilities for security within the Canadian Forces and to make recommendations for any changes. At the time there were two philosophies within the police, intelligence and security families. The Director General Intelligence saw a distinction between police and security, but saw a closer relationship between security and intelligence. The Chief of Personnel saw the police and security functions as complementary. The Turcot Report, when completed on 22 July 1966, directed that the responsibility for security should be placed under the DGI. July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 162 days remaining. ...


In January 1967, the Chief of Defence Staff directed the Director General Intelligence to perform a management analysis in order to make recommendations for the future management system for Intelligence, Security and Military Police in the Canadian Armed Forces. The Picquet Report, which was submitted in March 1967, concluded that security, intelligence and police should be managed by a Directorate General Intelligence and Security (DGIS) in the Vice Chief of Defence Staff Branch. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


On February 1, 1968, the Police and Intelligence units of the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army and Royal Canadian Air Force were amalgamated into the Canadian Armed Forces Security and Intelligence Branch. New insignia, Branch Colours and a Branch March ("Thunderbird") were approved. February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... ... The following is a list of the authorized marches for various organizations of the Canadian Forces. ...


Since amalgamation

With the C Pro C gone, Military Police platoons were integrated into Service Battalions. It was deemed that the Service Battalions would provide all support, including MP support, to the units in each Brigade. Only in 1971 did the Regular Force MP units leave the Service Battalions to be established as independent units. In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


In 1978, the Craven Report proposed that the CF Police and Intelligence personnel comprising the unified Security Branch be reorganized into a structured Security Branch and an Intelligence Branch. Following further studies, discussions and recommendations, the DGIS agreed, and on 3 December 1981, the CDS directed that separate Security and Intelligence Branches be established. On 29 October 1982, a ceremony was held at the Canadian Forces School of Intelligence and Security that inaugurated the new Canadian Forces Intelligence Branch and rededicated the newly renamed Security And Military Police Branch. 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Intelligence (Int) Branch is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ...


In 1989, the Canadian Government decided to pull the Canadian Military out of Germany, and 4 Military Police Platoon was disbanded. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 1 April 1997, the Canadian Army was restructured, allowing the Reserve Military Police Platoons to become independent units operating in support of their Brigade. April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After recommendations were made by former Chief Justice Brian Dickson in the Dickson Report, a new era was ushered in for the Security Branch. Changes included The re-establishment of the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal The Right Honourable Robert George Brian Dickson, PC , CC , CD , LL.B , LL.D (May 25, 1916 – October 17, 1998) was appointed Chief Justice of Canada on April 18, 1984. ...


In 1999, the Branch was renamed again and designated the Military Police Branch, under the command of the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal. 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Canadian Forces Provost Marshal is the head of the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service, the investigation arm of the Canadian Forces Military Police. ...


Canadian Forces Provost Marshal

The Canadian Forces Provost Marshal (CFPM) is responsible for developing policies and plans to guide the management of security and military police resources of the Department. The CFPM is the Departmental Security Officer (designate), the Branch Advisor for the Canadian Forces Security Branch, an active member of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and the departmental member of the interdepartmental Security Advisory Committee. The CFPM exercises technical control over all Military Police Functions within the Canadian Forces. In 2006, direct command and control over the National Investigation Service was transferred from the CFPM to the office of the Commanding Officer National Investigation Service. The CO NIS still reports to the CFPM. The CFPM exercises command and control over the Canadian Forces Military Police Academy and exercises functional control over the Canadian Forces Service Prison and Detention Barracks.


Training

During 1968, the Provost Corps School was renamed the Canadian Forces School of Intelligence and Security (CFSIS). 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ...


On 1 April 1999, the CFSIS was stood down. The Intelligence Training Company was reformed as the Canadian Forces School of Military Intelligence - Project (CFSMI), to be located at Canadian Forces Base Kingston. The Military Police component was reorganized to form the Canadian Military Police Academy (CFMPA) and is located at CFB Borden. In 2004 Managing Authority for CFMPA was transferred from Canadian Forces Training Systems Group to the CFPM, who now exercises full control of Career and Out of Service Training for the Military Police. The CFMPA has most recently changed over to the faculty system which will aid in providing more knowledgable ttraining staff. The CFMPA is currently in the process of searching for and the development of a new training facility. April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ...


Deployment

Military police officers serve on every base and station of the Canadian Forces in Canada, as well as with the various regiments and battalions. MPs continue to serve with United Nations forces and as part of the NATO component in Geilenkirchen, Germany, as well as in twenty-nine military police security guard detachments at Canadian embassies around the world. All CFBs have military police sections in domestic policing and security roles. British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ... Geilenkirchen is a town in North Rhine-Westphalia, in the district Heinsberg. ...


There are military police units at:

Military police units include: The Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), is the military academy of the Canadian Forces and is a full degree-granting university. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Canadian Forces Northern Area Headquarters (CFNA HQ) Yellowknife is a Canadian Forces base located in the city of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. ... Motto: none Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Official languages Chipewyan, Cree, English, French, Gwich’in, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun, North Slavey, South Slavey, Tłįchǫ [1] Government - Commissioner Tony Whitford - Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government (no party affiliations)) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 1 - Senate seats 1 Confederation 1870... Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) is the central command of NATO military forces. ... Casteau is an old village of Belgium in the french speaking region. ...

  • 1 Military Police Platoon (Regular) — CFB Edmonton, Alberta
  • 2 Military Police Platoon (Regular) — CFB Petawawa, Ontario
  • 3 Wing Military Police Squadron (Regular) - 3 Wing Bagotville, Quebec
  • 4 Wing Military Police Squadron (Regular) - 4 Wing Cold Lake
  • 5 Wing Military Police Flight (Regular) - Goose Bay, Labrador
  • 5 Military Police Platoon (Regular) — CFB Valcartier, Quebec
  • 8 Wing Military Police Squadron (Regular) — 8 Wing Trenton, Ontario
  • 9 Wing Military Police Flight (Regular) - 9 Wing Gander, Nfld
  • 14 Wing Military Police Squadron (Regular)- 14 Wing Greenwood, Nova Scotia
  • 15 Wing Military Police Flight (Regular) — 15 Wing Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
  • 17 Wing Military Police Squadron (Regular) — Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • 19 Military Police Squadron (Regular) — Comox, British Columbia
  • 22 Wing Military Police Flight (Regular) — North Bay, Ontario

Formation (Atlantic) Military Police - CFB Halifax, Nova Scotia Formation (Pacific) Military Poloice - CFB Esquimalt, British Columbia Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Edmonton is a Canadian Military base located in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, commonly referred to as CFB Petawawa, is a Canadian Forces Base located in Petawawa, Ontario. ... Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake, commonly referred to as CFB Cold Lake or 4 Wing Cold Lake, is a Canadian Forces Base located in Cold Lake, Alberta. ... Canadian Forces Base Valcartier is located 25 km west of Quebec City. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... Coordinates: Country Canada Province British Columbia Regional District Comox-Strathcona Incorporated 1953 Government  - Mayor Jim Brass Area  - City 26. ... North Bay ( , time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2006 population 53,966). ...

The 2 Military Police Company includes the following three units, Moncton (46°6′ N 64°46′ W) is the second largest city in the Canadian province of New Brunswick and is at the heart of the fastest growing urban area in the province. ...

The 4 Military Police Company includes the following three units, Nickname: Location of London in relation to Middlesex County and the Province of Ontario Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario County Middlesex County Settled 1826 as a village Incorporated 1855 as a city Government  - City Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco-Best  - Governing Body London City Council  - MPs Sue Barnes (LPC) Glen Pearson... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...

  • 4 Military Police Company Headquarters - Quebec City, Quebec
    • 43 Military Police Platoon (Reserve) - Jonquière, Quebec
    • 51 Military Police Platoon (Reserve) - Saint-Hubert, Quebec
    • 55 Military Police Platoon (Reserve) - Quebec City, Quebec

The 15 Military Police Company includes the following units Motto : « Don de Dieu feray valoir Â» (I shall put Gods gift to good use) Site in the province of Quebec Official logo Country  Canada Province Québec Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Constitution date 1833 Geographical code 24 23027 Founder Foundation... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² - Water... Jonquière was a city on the Saguenay River in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, Canada, near Chicoutimi. ... As of January 1, 2002, Saint-Hubert is a borough of Longueuil, Quebec. ...

Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ... Calgary is a city in the province of Alberta, Canada. ... Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia, the westernmost Canadian province. ... This page is for the city of Richmond, British Columbia. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ...

Order of precedence

Preceded by:
Chaplain Branch
Canadian Forces Military Police Succeeded by:
Legal Branch

The Chaplain Branch is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ... The Legal Branch is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ...

See also

The Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS) is the investigative arm of the Canadian Forces Military Police. ... The Intelligence (Int) Branch is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ...

External links

  • Canadian Forces Military police Recruiting site
  • CF MP Branch unofficial site
  • Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada - official site
  • CF PMO official site


 
Canadian Forces Personnel Branches
Air Operations Branch | Band Branch | Cadet Instructors Cadre | Canadian Forces Medical Service | Canadian Forces Military Police | Canadian Military Engineers | Chaplain Branch | Communications and Electronics Branch | Dental Branch | Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Branch | Intelligence Branch | Legal Branch | Logistics Branch | Naval Operations Branch | Personnel Selection Branch | Public Affairs Branch | Royal Canadian Armoured Corps | Royal Canadian Infantry Corps | Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery | Training Development Branch
Flag of Canada Law Enforcement Agencies of Canada edit
Federal agencies: Canada Border Services Agency | Canadian Forces Military Police | Royal Canadian Mounted Police | Correctional Service of Canada
Provincial agencies: British Columbia Provincial Police | Ontario Provincial Police | Royal Newfoundland Constabulary | Sûreté du Québec
Municipal agencies: Abbotsford Police Department | Barrie Police | Brockville Police Service | Calgary Police Service | Charlottetown Police Department | Delta Police Department | Durham Regional Police Service | Edmonton Police Service | Fredericton Police | Gatineau Police | Guelph Police Service | Halifax Regional Police | Halton Regional Police Service | Hamilton Police Service | London Police Service | New Westminster Police Service | Niagara Regional Police Service | Ottawa Police Service | Peel Regional Police | Port Moody Police Department | Regina Police Service | Saskatoon Police Service | Service de police de la Ville de Laval | Service de police de la Ville de Montréal | Service de police de la Ville de Québec | Toronto Police Service | Vancouver Police Department | Victoria Police Department | Waterloo Regional Police | West Vancouver Police Department | Winnipeg Police Service | York Regional Police
Specialized agencies: Aboriginal Police in Canada | CN Police | Canadian Pacific Railway Police Service | Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority Police Service | Niagara Parks Police | University of Toronto Campus Police | McMaster University Special Constable Service | TTC Special Constable Services | YRT/VIVA Special Constable Services

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian Forces Military Police - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1380 words)
Canadian Military Police are unusual in that they are classified as Peace Officers in terms of the Canadian Criminal Code, which gives them the same powers as civilian police.
The Royal Canadian Air Force Police (AFP) had the dual tasks of performing both police and security duties and were under the command of the base on which they served.
Military police officers serve on every base and station of the Canadian Forces in Canada, as well as with the various regiments and battalions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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