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Encyclopedia > Canadian Alliance candidates, 2000 Canadian federal election

The Canadian Alliance fielded several candidates in the 2000 federal election, and won 66 seats to become the Official Opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons. Many of the party's candidates have their own biography pages; information about others may be found here. The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ...


This page also provides information for Canadian Alliance candidates who contested by-elections between 2000 and 2004. This article is about the year 2000. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Manitoba

Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English (French is an official language of the Manitoban legislature and courts) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked...

Reginald A. Smith (Winnipeg Centre)

Smith was born on March 18, 1928 in Winnipeg. He was a civil servant at the Manitoba Land Title Office & Lands Branch from 1945 to 1951, and worked in land administration for the oil sector from 1951 to 1974. He was the secretary-manager of a recreational club in Calgary from 1974 to 1978, and owned a restaurant in White Rock, British Columbia until retiring in 1989.[1] Winnipeg Centre is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Manitoba. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Natural olive oil Synthetic motor oil Oil is a generic term for a chemical compound that is not miscible with water, and is in its liquid state at common ambient temperatures. ... Calgary is a city in the province of Alberta, Canada. ... White Rock Beach with the famous pier. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages none stated in law; English is de facto Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 5th 944,735... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He became involved with the Reform Party in 1989 while living in British Columbia, and remained active in the party after returning to Winnipeg.

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes % Place Winner
1993 federal Winnipeg North Centre Reform 2,275 3/8 David Walker, Liberal
1997 federal Winnipeg Centre Reform 3,095 11.53 3/8 Pat Martin, New Democratic Party
2000 federal Winnipeg Centre Alliance 3,975 3/6 Pat Martin, New Democratic Party

Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Winnipeg North Centre is a riding or electoral district that elects a Member of Parliament to the Canadian House of Commons. ... David Walker (born August 1, 1947) is a Canadian politician. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Winnipeg Centre is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Manitoba. ... Patrick Pat Martin (born December 13, 1955 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian politician. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy and moderate democratic socialist tendencies that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Winnipeg Centre is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Manitoba. ... Patrick Pat Martin (born December 13, 1955 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian politician. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy and moderate democratic socialist tendencies that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ...

Bill Hancock (Winnipeg South)

A Winnipeg Free Press report from 1997 identifies Hancock as a thirty-five year-old political analyst (24 March 1997). In 2000, he listed himself as a consultant. He received 12,638 votes (30.04%), finishing second against Liberal Party incumbent Reg Alcock. Winnipeg South is a Canadian electoral district that covers the south of the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Hon. ...


Betty Granger (Winnipeg South Centre)

Granger's campaign was marked by controversy over comments that she made concerning an "Asian invasion" of Canadian universities. She acknowledged that her statement was inappropriate, and suspended her campaign in late November 2004. Her name remained on the ballot, and she received 3,210 votes (8.53%) to finish fourth against Liberal candidate Anita Neville. Betty Granger is a former school trustee in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... This article needs to be updated. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Anita Neville (born July 22, 1942 in Winnipeg, Canadian politician. ...


Ontario

Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th 1,076,395 km...

Sean McAdam (Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington)

McAdam is a political consultant. He first campaigned for public office in the 1993 federal election as the Reform Party candidates in Kingston and the Islands. He was twenty-four years old at the time, and a Political Science student at Queen's University (Kingston Whig-Standard, 23 October 1993). He finished third against Liberal incumbent Peter Milliken, and later worked on the Ottawa staff of federal Reform Party leader Preston Manning. Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... Political science is an academic and research discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Hon. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Preston Manning Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian politician. ...


McAdam ran for the Reform Party again in the 1997 election, defeating Vito D. Luceno and Laurie Greenidge for the nomination in Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington (KWS, 7 October 1996). He focused on gun control as a primary issue (KWS, 17 May 1997), and finished third against Liberal Larry McCormick. After the election, McAdam worked for two years in the office of Reform Member of Parliament (MP) Art Hanger before becoming Manning's Question Period advisor (National Post, 1 May 1999). He was an early supporter of the Reform Party's United Alternative initiative, which eventually led to the creation of the Canadian Alliance (KWS, 2 June 1998). He worked as a senior aide to Stockwell Day in late 2000, after Day defeated Manning to become Alliance leader. 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... This article is about the Canadian politician; Larry McCormick is also the name of a Los Angeles broadcast journalist. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Arthur Art Hanger (born February 19, 1943 in Three Hills, Alberta) is a Canadian politician. ... Question Period or Oral Questions is a Canadian parliamentary practice similar to the British Prime Ministers Questions in which Members of Parliament submit questions to the government ministers including the Prime Minister for answer. ... Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... Hon. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


McAdam won the HFLA Alliance nomination over Vito Luceno and former Member of Provincial Parliament Gary Fox for the 2000 election (KWS, 23 October 2000) and, although the riding was seen as winnable for his party, lost to McCormick a second time (KWS, 28 November 2000. He continued to work for Day until March 2001, when he returned to work for Art Hanger. In April, he supported Hanger's call for Day to resign as leader (National Post, 24 April 2001). He later said, "Once I started to work with [Day] in a senior position it was clear to me that he wasn't the man for the job" (KWS, 17 May 2001). He worked as a senior aide to the breakaway Democratic Representative Caucus later in the year. He was also critical of plans to have Stephen Harper challenge Day for the Alliance leadership, writing that Harper "seems to focus more on the differences than on what can unite" (National Post, 16 August 2001). A Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) is an elected member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Gary John Fox (born December 23, 1943 in Picton, Ontario) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Democratic Reform Association logo The Democratic Representative Caucus was a group of Canadian Members of Parliament who left the Canadian Alliance in 2001 in protest against the leadership of Stockwell Day. ... Stephen Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


McAdam has also worked as a palm reader and hypnotist (National Post, 1 May 1999). Chiromancy or cheiromancy, (Greek cheir, “hand”; manteia, “divination”), is the art of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm, also known as palmistry, palm-reading, or hand analysis. ... Hypnotic Seance, by Richard Bergh Hypnosis is understood to be a psychological condition in which an individual may be induced to show apparent differences in behavior and thinking. ...

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes % Place Winner
1993 federal Kingston and the Islands Reform 7,175 12.51 3/7 Peter Milliken, Liberal
1997 federal Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington Reform 12,045 3/6 Larry McCormick, Liberal
2000 federal Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington Alliance 13,227 2/8 Larry McCormick, Liberal

Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... Hon. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... This article is about the Canadian politician; Larry McCormick is also the name of a Los Angeles broadcast journalist. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Ontario. ... This article is about the Canadian politician; Larry McCormick is also the name of a Los Angeles broadcast journalist. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ...

Kevin Hunter Goligher (Kingston and the Islands)

Goligher was born in Montreal. He is a veteran of the Canadian armed forces and has done extensive service overseas, including in Cyprus and Sinai (KWS, 6 May and 31 October 2000). He lived in Kingston during the 1980s, and returned to the city in 1995 after retiring from the army. Goligher was forty-six years old in 2000, worked as a freelance writer, and was a member of the Kingston Whig-Standard Community Editorial Board (KWS, 17 January 2000). Originally a Progressive Conservative, he joined the Canadian Alliance in 2000 after a request to campaign for the party. He defeated former riding president Siobhain Fiene to win the nomination (KWS, 26 October 2000), and received 7,904 votes (15.44%) to finish third against Liberal incumbent Peter Milliken. Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (Fr: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the combined branches of the military of Canada. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sina) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... Kingston is a city in Ontario, Canada, located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake empties into the St. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Kingston Whig-Standard is a daily newspaper in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Hon. ...


Nestor Gayowsky (Ottawa—Vanier)

Gayowsky was born in Brandon, Manitoba to a Ukrainian Canadian family, and was a career diplomat for thirty-six years before running for public office. He served in Scandinavia, Finland, Italy and the Soviet Union, and became Canada's first consul general to Ukraine in 1991 (Edmonton Journal, 29 December 1990). After Canada recognized Ukraine's independence from the Soviet Union, Gayowsky was named charge d'affaires of the Canadian embassy (Toronto Star, 27 January 1992). He later represented the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in Kiev (Financial Post, 20 November 1993). Ottawa—Vanier is a federal and provincial electoral district that makes up the eastern part of downtown Ottawa. ... Location of Brandon, Manitoba Brandon, known as the Wheat City, is a city in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English (French is an official language of the Manitoban legislature and courts) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked... A Ukrainian Canadian is a person of Ukrainian descent or origin who was born in or immigrated to Canada. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Founded in 1991, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) uses the tools of investment to help build market economies and democracies in 27 countries from central Europe to central Asia. ... A monument to St. ...


He received 7,600 votes (15.79%) in 2000, finishing second against Liberal incumbent Mauril Belanger. A newspaper report from the election lists him as 66 years old. He supported a bridge over the Ottawa River east of Kettle Island, and criticized the Liberal government's record on taxes and patronage (Ottawa Citizen, 18 November 2000). The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Mauril Bélanger (born June 15, 1955) is a Canadian Member of Parliament. ... This is about the river in Canada. ...


Gayowsky later moved to British Columbia, and was campaign manager for Conservative candidate James Lunney in the 2004 election (Victoria Times-Colonist, 17 May 2004). He remains interested in Ukrainian affairs, and was an OCSE observer for the late 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, won by Victor Yushchenko (Ottawa Citizen, 4 December 2004). Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages none stated in law; English is de facto Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 5th 944,735... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... James Lunney (born September 5, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the president of Ukraine. ...


Randy Taylor Dumont (St. Catharines)

Before running for office, Randy Dumont was for many years a popular radio personality on CKTB FM in St. Catharines under the name Randy Taylor. He was laid off from the station in May 2000 by a program manager who argued that he did not fit the station's "moderate approach" (Hamilton Spectator, 6 May 2000), and briefly worked at CFRB in Toronto before the election. Dumont used his stage name as an unofficial middle name for the 2000 campaign (Vancouver Sun, 30 October 2000). St. ... Motto: Industry and Liberality Established: Settled in 1797 Incorporated in 1845 Area: 97. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... CFRB, or CFRB 1010 as it is often referred to, is an AM radio station in Toronto, Canada, broadcasting on 1010 kHz, with a shortwave radio simulcast by CFRX on 6070 kHz. ...


During the election, one national reporter described him as a "shock jock" in the style of Howard Stern, and noted that he once ran a stunt contest won by "a man who nailed his testicles to a board". In response to criticisms, Dumont argued that he was simply playing a character when on-air (Globe and Mail, 22 November 2000). He was also quoted as saying, "We cannot afford to have an 'everything for everyone' health care system any more...We have the perfect opportunity now to look at private enterprise to deliver much-needed health services." (Canada NewsWire, 10 November 2000) Howard Stern Howard Allen Stern (born January 12, 1954) is an American radio and TV personality, humorist and author. ...


Dumont received 15,871 votes (33.97%), finishing second against Liberal incumbent Walt Lastewka. He returned to CFRB in 2002-03, before leaving to do a television show entitled "Spirit of Life".[2] The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Walt Lastewka Walter Thomas Walt Lastewka, PC, MP (born October 11, 1940 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nabil El-Khazen (Scarborough Southwest)

El-Khazen was born in the British Mandate of Palestine (Globe and Mail, 19 October 1998). He holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree from Damascus University (1969), a Master of Engineering degree from the American University of Beirut (1973), and Master of Science degree in Physics from York University (1982). He has also completed Ph.D. level courses at York University. Scarborough Southwest is a Canadian electoral district covering the southwestern part of the Scarborough part of Toronto. ... Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Bachelor of Engineering (BAI (in latin), BEng, BE, or BESc) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded to a student after three or four years of studying engineering at an accredited university in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and other countries, such as Australia and India. ... The University of Damascus (Arabic: جامعة دمشق jāmi‘atu-d-dimashq) is the largest university in Syria, located in the capital Damascus. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... A Master of Engineering (M.Eng. ... The American University of Beirut (AUB) is a private, independent, non-sectarian university founded in 1866 in Beirut, Lebanon. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... York University (YorkU) is a large comprehensive university, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


El-Khazen has worked as a consulting structural engineer since 1978, was given Professional Engineer status in Ontario since 1979, and is the owner of El-Khazen Consulting Ltd. In 1996, he became a member of the Maintenance Transportation Policy Advisory Committee of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.[3] He supported Preston Manning's United Alternative movement in 2002, which led to the creation of the Canadian Alliance.[4] 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Professional Engineer is the term for registered or licensed engineers in some countries, including the United States and Canada. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... Preston Manning Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian politician. ... Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ...


He received 4,912 votes (13.73%) in the 2000 election, finishing third against Liberal incumbent Tom Wappel. He was 54 years old at the time of the election (Toronto Star, 19 November 2000). The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Thomas William Wappel, MP (born February 9, 1950) is a Canadian Member of Parliament. ...


El-Khazen was a liaison between Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) Judy Sgro and the PEO Toronto-Humber & Mississauga Chapters after the 2000 election.[5] A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... The Honourable Judy Sgro, PC MP (born December 16, 1944, Moncton, New Brunswick) is a Canadian politician. ...


Shaun Gillespie (Whitby—Ajax)

Gillespie was 35 years old at the time of the election (Toronto Star, 23 November 2000), and worked as a police officer in Toronto (Toronto Star, 28 October 2000). He took a leave of absence from his official duties, and campaigned on a "law and order" platform (Toronto Star, 28 November 2000). He received 13,159 votes (26.98%), finishing second against Liberal incumbent Judi Longfield. Whitby—Ajax is a provincial and a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1997 to 2003 and in Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Honourable Judi Longfield (born March 23, 1947 in Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ...


In earlier years, Gillespie had played bass guitar in a new-wave band with Our Lady Peace guitarist Mike Turner (Toronto Star, 11 November 2000). Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case The electric bass guitar (also called an electric bass, or simply a bass) an electrically-amplified string instrument similar in appearance to an electric guitar, but with a larger body, a longer-scale neck and four strings tuned an octave lower in pitch... Our Lady Peace, colloquially OLP, is a Canadian alternative rock band consisting of Raine Maida (vocals), Duncan Coutts (bass), Jeremy Taggart (drums), and Steve Mazur (guitar). ...


by-election candidates

Denis Simard (St. Boniface, by-election, May 13, 2002)

Simard was born, raised and educated in St. Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba. At the time of his candidacies, he worked as a diesel mechanic in that city. He joined the Reform Party in 1991, and remained with the party until it joined the Canadian Alliance in 2000 (Winnipeg Free Press, 25 May 1997). He campaigned for the Reform Party in St. Boniface in the 1997 federal election, and finished third against Liberal Ron Duhamel with 6,658 votes. St. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... Saint Boniface is an area of the city of Winnipeg, home to the Franco-Manitoban community. ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti lib̩ral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Honourable Ronald J. Duhamel (March 2, 1938 РSeptember 30, 2002) was a Canadian Member of Parliament and Senator. ...


Simard was the Manitoba organizer for Tom Long's bid to lead the Canadian Alliance in 2000. When Long was eliminated from the contest after the first ballot, he turned his support to the eventual winner, Stockwell Day (Regina Leader Post, 28 June 2000). Simard saught the Canadian Alliance nomination for Provencher in the 2000 federal election, but finished fourth against Vic Toews (Winnipeg Free Press, 31 October 2000). Tom Long (born 1959) is a Canadian political strategist. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Hon. ... Provencher is the name of a federal electoral district in Manitoba, Canada. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Hon. ...


Simard received 4,497 votes (21.73%) in the 2002 by-election, finishing second against his distant cousin, Liberal candidate Raymond Simard. Raymond Simard (born March 8, 1958) is a politician from Manitoba, Canada. ...


A different Denis Simard campaigned for the Reform Party in a 1996 by-election in Lac-Saint-Jean, while a third Denis Simard has campaigned for the Parti Quebecois. There is no known connection between these individuals and the Denis Simard of St. Boniface. 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Lac-Saint-Jean was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Quebec. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a left wing political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. ...


 
 

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