FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Canada Goose
Canada Goose

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Genus: Branta
Species: B. canadensis
Binomial name
Branta canadensis
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Canada Goose distribution, including native (dark tones) and introduced (light tones) populationsCanada Goose summer: yellowCanada Goose all year: greenCanada Goose winter: blueCackling Goose summer: pink
Canada Goose distribution, including native (dark tones) and introduced (light tones) populations
Canada Goose summer: yellow
Canada Goose all year: green
Canada Goose winter: blue
Cackling Goose summer: pink
Subspecies
  • B. c. occidentalis
    Dusky Canada Goose
  • B. c. fulva
    Vancouver Canada Goose
  • B. c. parvipes
    Lesser Canada Goose
  • B. c. moffitti
    Moffitt's Canada Goose
  • B. c. maxima
    Giant Canada Goose
  • B. c. interior
    Interior Canada Goose
  • B. c. canadensis
    Atlantic Canada Goose

The Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) is a goose belonging to the genus Branta native to North America. It is sometimes called 'Canadian Goose', although that is not considered to be strictly correct according to the American Ornithological Union and the Audubon Society.[2][3] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first citation for Canada Goose dates back to 1772. Participants in the United States Antarctic Program at the summit of Observation Hill in Antarctica, wearing their standard issue expedition parkas. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1512 × 1008 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A Canada Goose skimming over ice at the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary in Calgary Alberta. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn3. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Families Anhimidae Anseranatidae Anatidae †Dromornithidae †Presbyornithidae The order Anseriformes contains about 150 species of birds in three families: the Anhimidae (the screamers), Anseranatidae (the Magpie-goose), and the Anatidae, which includes over 140 species of waterfowl, among them the ducks, geese, and swans. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Thalassorninae Anserinae Stictonettinae Plectropterinae Tadorninae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Oxyurinae and see text Anatidae is the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swan. ... Species see text. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1306x707, 86 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Canada Goose ... Binomial name Branta hutchinsii (Richardson, 1832) Subspecies (Richardsons Cackling Goose) (Bering Cackling Goose) - extinct (Aleutian Cackling Goose) (Taverners Cackling Goose) (Small Cackling Goose) Synonyms Branta canadensis hutchinsii Branta canadensis asiatica Branta canadensis leucopareia Branta canadensis taverneri Branta canadensis minima The Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii), colloquially Lesser or Small... This article is about the zoological term. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species see text. ...

Contents

Taxonomy

The Canada Goose was one of the many species described by Linnaeus in his 18th century work, Systema Naturae.[4] It belongs to the Branta genus of geese, which contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey species of the Anser genus. The specific epithet canadensis is a New Latin word meaning "of Canada". Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Cover of the tenth edition of Linnaeuss Systema Naturae (1758). ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Geese redirects here. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... New Latin (or Neo-Latin) is a post-medieval version of Latin, now used primarily in International Scientific Vocabulary cladistics and systematics. ...


Description

Yellow plumage of gosling

The black head and neck with white "chinstrap" distinguish the Canada Goose from all except the Barnacle Goose, but the latter has a black breast, and grey, rather than brownish, body plumage. There are seven subspecies of this bird, of varying sizes and plumage details, but all are recognizable as Canada Geese. Some of the smaller races can be hard to distinguish from the newly-separated Cackling Goose. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x960, 277 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goose Canada Goose User:Fir0002/Natures pics ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x960, 277 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goose Canada Goose User:Fir0002/Natures pics ... Binomial name Branta leucopsis (Bechstein, 1803) The Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis) belongs to the genus Branta of black geese, which contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. ... This article is about the zoological term. ... Binomial name Branta hutchinsii (Richardson, 1832) Subspecies (Richardsons Cackling Goose) (Bering Cackling Goose) - extinct (Aleutian Cackling Goose) (Taverners Cackling Goose) (Small Cackling Goose) Synonyms Branta canadensis hutchinsii Branta canadensis asiatica Branta canadensis leucopareia Branta canadensis taverneri Branta canadensis minima The Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii), colloquially Lesser or Small...


This species is 76-110 cm (30-43 in) long with a 127-180 cm (50-71 in) wing span.[5] The male usually weighs 3.2–6.5 kg, (7–14 pounds), and can be very aggressive in defending territory. The female looks virtually identical but is slightly lighter at 2.5–5.5 kg (5.5–12 pounds), generally 10% smaller than its male counterpart, and has a different honk. An exceptionally large male of the race B. c. maxima, the "giant Canada goose" (which rarely exceed 8 kg/18 lb), weighed 10.9 kg (24 pounds) and had a wingspan of 2.24 m (88 inches). The life span in the wild is 10–24 years.[5]


Distribution and habitat

This species is native to North America. It breeds in Canada and the northern United States in a variety of habitats. Its nest is usually located in an elevated area near water, sometimes on a beaver lodge. Its eggs are laid in a shallow depression lined with plant material and down. The Great Lakes region maintains a very large population of Canada Geese. North American redirects here. ... Binomial name Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820 A taxidermied American Beaver The American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is a large semi-aquatic rodent native to Canada, most of the United States and parts of northern Mexico. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


By the early 20th century, over-hunting and loss of habitat in the late 1800s and early 1900s had resulted in a serious decline in the numbers of this bird in its native range. The Giant Canada Goose subspecies was believed to be extinct in the 1950s until, in 1962, a small flock was discovered wintering in Rochester, Minnesota by Harold Hanson of the Illinois Natural History Survey. With improved game laws and habitat recreation and preservation programs, their populations have recovered in most of their range, although some local populations, especially of the subspecies occidentalis, may still be declining. Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ... Game laws are statutes which regulate the right to pursue and take or kill certain kinds of wild animals (game). ...


In recent years, Canada geese populations in some areas have grown significantly, so much so that some consider them pests (for their droppings, the bacteria in their droppings, and noise). This problem is partially due to the removal of natural predators and an abundance of safe, man-made bodies of water (such as on golf courses, public parks and beaches, and in gated communities).


Contrary to its normal migration routine, large flocks of Canada Geese have established permanent residence in the Chesapeake Bay and in Virginia's James River.


Outside North America

Canada Geese have reached northern Europe naturally, as has been proved by ringing recoveries. The birds are of at least the subspecies parvipes, and possibly others. Canada Geese are also found naturally on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, eastern China, and throughout Japan. This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... Bird ringing (also known as bird banding) is an aid to studying wild birds, by attaching a small individually numbered metal or plastic ring to their legs or wings, so that various aspects of the birds life can be studied by the ability to re-find the same individual... “Kamchatka” redirects here. ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ...


Greater Canada Geese have also been introduced in Europe, and have established populations in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Scandinavia. Semi-tame feral birds are common in parks, and have become a pest in some areas. The geese were first introduced in Britain in the late 17th century as an addition to King James II's waterfowl collection in St. James's Park. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... A feral horse (an American mustang) in Wyoming A feral animal or plant is one that has escaped from domestication and returned, partly or wholly, to its wild state. ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... St. ...


Canada Geese were introduced as a game bird into New Zealand and have also become a problem in some areas.


Behavior

Mid-flight
Mid-flight
Looking for food on a partially frozen pond
Looking for food on a partially frozen pond

Like most geese, the Canada goose is naturally migratory with the wintering range being most of the United States. The calls overhead from large groups of Canada Geese flying in V-shaped formation signal the transitions into spring and autumn. In some areas, migration routes have changed due to changes in habitat and food sources. In mild climates, such as the Pacific Northwest, due to a lack of former predators, some of the population has become non-migratory. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x750, 199 KB) A Canada Goose flying at Burnaby Lake Regional Park (Piper Spit), Burnaby, British Columbia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x750, 199 KB) A Canada Goose flying at Burnaby Lake Regional Park (Piper Spit), Burnaby, British Columbia. ... Flock of Barnacle Geese during autumn migration Bird migration refers to the regular seasonal journeys undertaken by many species of birds. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ...

Branta canadensis call Image File history File links Branta_canadensis. ...

Call
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Diet

The diet of the Canada Goose includes green vegetation and grains. The Canada Goose eats a variety of grasses when on land. It feeds by grasping a blade of grass with the bill, then tearing it with a jerk of the head. The Canada Goose also eats grains such as wheat, beans, rice, and corn when they are available. In the water, it feeds from silt at the bottom of the body of water. It also feeds on aquatic plants, such as seaweeds.[5] For other uses, see Silt (disambiguation). ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ...


Reproduction

Courting
Courting

During the second year of their lives, Canada Geese find a mate. They are monogamous, and most couples stay together all of their lives.[5] If one is killed, the other may find a new mate. The female lays 4–8 eggs and both parents protect the nest while the eggs incubate, but the female spends more time at the nest than the male. Known egg predators include Arctic Foxes, Red Foxes, all large gulls, Common Raven, American Crows and bears. During this incubation period, the adults lose their flight feathers, so they cannot fly until after their eggs hatch. This stage lasts for 25–28 days. In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... The word incubate in the context of birds refers to the development of the chick (embryo) within the egg and the constant temperature required for the development of it over a specific period. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Arctic Fox range The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus), also known as the White Fox or Snow Fox, is a fox of the order Carnivora. ... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... “Seagull” redirects here. ... Binomial name Corvus corax Linnaeus, 1758 Common Raven range Subspecies The Common Raven (Corvus corax), also known as the Northern Raven, is a large all-black passerine bird in the crow family, with iridescent feathers. ... Binomial name Corvus brachyrhynchos Brehm, 1822 American Crow range The American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is slightly smaller than the European Carrion Crow in overall size (39-49 cm in length) and also has a proportionately smaller bill. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Red Kite (Milvus milvus) in flight, showing remiges and rectrices. ...

A crèche
A crèche

Adult geese are often seen leading their goslings in a line, usually with one parent at the front, and the other at the back. While protecting their goslings, parents often violently chase away nearby creatures, from small blackbirds to other geese, to humans that approach, after warning them by giving off a hissing sound. Most of the species that prey on eggs will also take a gosling. However, geese may form groups of a number of goslings and a few adults, called crèches. The offspring enter the fledging stage any time from 6 to 9 weeks of age. They do not leave their parents until after the spring migration, when they return to their birthplace. Once they reach adulthood, Canada Geese are rarely preyed on, but can be taken by Coyotes, Red Foxes, Gray Wolves, Snowy Owls, Great Horned Owls, Golden Eagles and, most often, Bald Eagles. Canada goose populations inhabiting areas where domesticated geese also inhabit can and will interbreed with them, producing offspring that often resemble canada geese in shape, but with a white or gray body, dark grey head and neck, and off-white chin, with pink feet.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 635 KB) Summary Canada goose creche, Fairview Heights, Illinois, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 635 KB) Summary Canada goose creche, Fairview Heights, Illinois, 2006. ... The Crèche in zoology refers to care of anothers offspring, for instance in a colony. ... The Crèche in zoology refers to care of anothers offspring, for instance in a colony. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... Binomial name Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758 The Gray Wolf (Canis lupus; also spelled Grey Wolf, see spelling differences; also known as Timber Wolf or Wolf) is a mammal in the order Carnivora. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca Stephens, 1826 The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. ... Binomial name (Gmelin, 1788) Distribution Subspecies see text Synonyms Strix virginiana Gmelin, 1788 The Great Horned Owl, Bubo virginianus, is a very large owl native to North and South America. ... For other uses, see Golden Eagle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bald Eagle (disambiguation). ...


Systematics

From behind
On a frozen lake in Edison, US
On a frozen lake in Edison, US

The Cackling Goose was originally considered to be the same species or a subspecies of the Canada Goose, but in July 2004 the American Ornithologists' Union's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature split the two into two species, making Cackling Goose into a full species with the scientific name Branta hutchinsii. The British Ornithologists Union followed suit in June 2005.[6] Binomial name Branta hutchinsii (Richardson, 1832) Subspecies (Richardsons Cackling Goose) (Bering Cackling Goose) - extinct (Aleutian Cackling Goose) (Taverners Cackling Goose) (Small Cackling Goose) Synonyms Branta canadensis hutchinsii Branta canadensis asiatica Branta canadensis leucopareia Branta canadensis taverneri Branta canadensis minima The Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii), colloquially Lesser or Small... The American Ornithologists Union (AOU) an ornithological organization in the USA. Unlike the National Audubon Society, its members are primarily professional ornithologists rather than amateur birders. ... Categories: Organization stubs | United Kingdom-related stubs | Animal stubs ...


The AOU has divided the many subspecies between the two animals. To the present species were assigned: This article is about the zoological term. ...

  • Atlantic Canada Goose, Branta canadensis canadensis
  • Interior Canada Goose, Branta canadensis interior
  • Giant Canada Goose, Branta canadensis maxima
  • Moffitt's Canada Goose, Branta canadensis moffitti
  • Vancouver Canada Goose, Branta canadensis fulva
  • Dusky Canada Goose, Branta canadensis occidentalis
  • part of "Lesser complex", Branta canadensis parvipes

The distinctions between the two geese have led to confusion and debate among ornithologists. This has been aggravated by the overlap between the small types of Canada Goose and larger types of Cackling Goose. The old "Lesser Canada Goose" was believed to be a partly hybrid population, with the birds named taverneri considered a mixture of minima, occidentalis and parvipes. In addition, it has been determined that the Barnacle Goose is a derivative of the Cackling Goose lineage, whereas the Hawaiian Goose is an insular representative of the Canada Goose. This article is about a biological term. ... Binomial name Branta leucopsis (Bechstein, 1803) The Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis) belongs to the genus Branta of black geese, which contains species with largely black plumage, distinguishing them from the grey Anser species. ... Binomial name Branta sandvicensis (Vigors, 1833) The Hawaiian Goose or Nēnē, Branta sandvicensis, is a species of goose endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. ...


Relationship with humans

USDA Wildlife Services agents trap and gas geese in Seattle - 2002
USDA Wildlife Services agents trap and gas geese in Seattle - 2002

In North America, non-migratory Canada Goose populations have been on the rise. The species is frequently found on golf courses, parking lots and urban parks, which would have previously hosted only migratory geese on rare occasions. Owing to its adaptability to human-altered areas, it has become the most common waterfowl species in North America. In many areas, non-migratory Canada Geese are now regarded as pests. They are suspected of being a cause of an increase in high fecal coliforms at beaches.[7] An extended hunting season and the use of noise makers have been used in an attempt to disrupt suspect flocks. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... North American redirects here. ... Falcated Duck at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands centre, Gloucestershire, England Wildfowl or waterfowl, also waterbirds, is the collective term for the approximately 147 species of swans, geese and ducks, classified in the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. ... North American redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Coliform Index be merged into this article or section. ...


Since 1999, The USDA Wildlife Services agency has been engaged in lethal culls of Canada Geese primarily in urban or densely populated areas. The agency responds to municipalities or private land owners, such as golf courses, who find the geese obtrusive or object to their waste. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ...


In 1995, a US Air Force E-3 Sentry aircraft at Elmendorf AFB, Alaska struck a flock of Canada geese on takeoff and crashed, killing all 24 crew. The accident sparked efforts to avoid such events, including habitat modification, scare tactics, herding and relocation, and culling of flocks.[8] Seal of the Air Force. ... The Boeing E-3 Sentry is an American military airborne warning and control system (AWACS) aircraft that provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications, to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Saudi Arabia, and NATO air defense forces. ... A Japanese F-15 takes off from Elmendorf during a joint exercise. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...


When threatened, geese stand erect and hiss.


References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2006). Branta canadensis. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 11 May 2006.
  2. ^ Kirby (1820). Kirby's Wonderful and Scientific Museum: Or, Magazine of Remarkable Characters (1820). 
  3. ^ Audubon Society [1]
  4. ^ (Latin) Linnaeus, C (1758). Systema naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata. Holmiae. (Laurentii Salvii). 
  5. ^ a b c d Dewey, T; H. Lutz (2002). Branta canadensis. University of Michigan. Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  6. ^ Stackhouse, Mark. The New Goose.
  7. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Retrieved December 15, 2007, http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/
  8. ^ http://www.af.mil/news/airman/1297/bash.htm Air Force News article on Yukla 27
  • Angus, Wilson. Identification and range of subspecies within the Canada and Cackling Goose Complex (Branta canadensis & B. hutchinsii). [2]
  • Moser, Timothy J., Craven, Scott R. and Miller, Brian K. Canada Geese in the Mississippi Flyway: A Guide for Goose Hunters and Goose Watchers. [3]
  • Rural Development Service (2005). The management of problems caused by Canada geese: a guide to best practice (PDF). Technical Advice Note 51. DEFRA. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  • Hanson, Harold C. (1997). The Giant Canada Goose. Southern Illinois University Press. ISBN 978-0809319244. 

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for environmental protection, food production and standards, agriculture, fisheries and rural communities. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... North American redirects here. ... Binomial name Colinus virginianus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Bobwhite Quail or Northern Bobwhite, Colinus virginianus, is a ground-dwelling bird native to North America. ... Binomial name Alectoris chukar (Gray, JE, 1830) The chukar, Alectoris chukar, is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Perdix perdix (Linnaeus, 1758) The Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) is a gamebird in pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies Tympanuchus cupido attwateri Tympanuchus cupido cupido† Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus The Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, is a large bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Winter only (blue), summer only (light green), and year-round (dark green) range Subspecies See text The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove family Columbidae. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Lagopus mutus (Montin, 1781) The Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) is a small (31-35 cm) bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) The Ruffed Grouse, Bonasa umbellus, is a medium-sized grouse occurring in forests across Canada and the Appalachian and northern United States including Alaska. ... Binomial name Tympanuchus phasianellus (Linnaeus, 1758) Introduction The Sharp-tailed Grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus, is a medium-sized prairie grouse similar in size to the Greater Prairie-Chicken, males weigh an average of 33. ... Binomial name Gallinago gallinago Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Wilsons Snipe) The Common Snipe, Gallinago gallinago, is a small, stocky shorebird. ... Binomial name Falcipennis canadensis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Spruce Grouse, Falcipennis canadensis, is a medium-sized grouse. ... Species Eurasian Woodcock, Amami Woodcock, Bukidnon Woodcock, Dusky Woodcock, Sulawesi Woodcock, Moluccan Woodcock, American Woodcock, The woodcock are a group of seven very similar wading bird species in the genus Scolopax, characterised by a long slender bill and cryptic brown and blackish plumage. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Anas rubripes Brewster, 1902 The American Black Duck (Anas rubripes) is a large-sized dabbling duck. ... Binomial name Aythya valisineria (Wilson, 1814) The Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) is a larger-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anas strepera Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Common Gadwall) (Washington Island Gadwall) - extinct The Gadwall (Anas strepera) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and central North America. ... Binomial name Aythya marila (Linnaeus, 1761) The Greater Scaup (Aythya marila), or just Scaup in Europe, is a small diving duck. ... Binomial name Aythya affinis (Eyton, 1838) The Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) is a small diving duck. ... For other uses, see Mallard (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 The Pintail or Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of Canada, Alaska and the mid-western United States. ... Binomial name Aythya americana (Eyton, 1838) The Redhead (Aythya americana) is a medium-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anser rossii Cassin, 1861 Synonyms The Rosss Goose (Anser rossii) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Anser caerulescens (Linnaeus, 1758) The Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Aix sponsa Linnaeus, 1758 Nesting (light green), wintering (blue) and year-round (dark green) ranges of . ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Caribou redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cougar (disambiguation), Puma (disambiguation), or Panther. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... Rocky Mountain Goat and Mountain Goats redirect here. ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1817) The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer whose habitat is in the western half of North America. ... Binomial name (Zimmermann, 1780) Range map. ... Binomial name Nelson, 1884 The Dall Sheep (originally Dalls Sheep, sometimes called Thinhorn Sheep), Ovis dalli, is a wild sheep of the mountainous regions of northwest North America, ranging from white to slate brown and having curved yellowish brown horns. ... This article is about the animal. ... restoring version with Binomial name (Daudin, 1801) American Alligator range map The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of the two living species of Alligator, a genus within the family Alligatoridae. ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Sciurus niger Linnaeus, 1758 The Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) is the largest species of tree squirrels native to North America. ... For other uses, see Gray Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Gmelin, 1788 The eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a tree squirrel native to the eastern and midwestern United States and to the southerly portions of the eastern provinces of Canada. ... Genera Several; see text Didelphimorphia is the order of common opossums of the Western Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For the river, see Raccoon River. ... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... Binomial name Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777 The Snowshoe Hare (Lepus americanus) is a species of hare found in North America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into hunting. ... Theodore Roosevelt in 1885 with his highly-decorated deer-skin hunting suit, and Tiffany-carved hunting knife and rifle. ... Duck hunters spring from their blind to take a shot at an incoming bird. ... Main article: Gray Wolf Wolf hunting is the practice of hunting wolves, especially the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus). ... Upland hunting is an American term for a form of bird hunting in which the hunter pursues upland birds including quail, pheasant, grouse, prairie chicken, chuckar, grey partridge, and others. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The New Goose  -- Canada / Cackling Goose Split (2453 words)
The Canada Goose complex has been usually divided into subspecies along lines of size and color, with larger birds nesting mostly in the south and smaller birds mostly in the north.
The smallest of the Canada Geese subspecies and the largest of the Cackling Geese subspecies are about the size of a Snow Goose, or about half the size of the Canada Goose that is commonly found in Utah.
To be certain of a Cackling Goose, a birder would have to see a bird only one-quarter to about one-third the size of the common form of Canada Goose, or roughly from the size of a Mallard to the size of a Ross's Goose.
Canada Goose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1343 words)
Canada Geese are also found naturally on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, eastern China, and throughout Japan.
The Giant Canada Goose subspecies was believed to be extinct in the 1950s until, in 1962, a small flock was discovered wintering in Rochester, Minnesota by Harold Hanson of the Illinois Natural History Survey.
The old "Lesser Canada Goose" was believed to be a partly hybrid population, with the birds named taverneri considered a mixture of minima, occidentalis and parvipes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m