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Encyclopedia > Canada Day
Canada Day
Canada Day
Children watch the Canada Day parade in Montreal
Also called Fête du Canada;
previously named Dominion Day
Observed by Canadians (Canada)
Type Historical, Cultural, Nationalist
Date July 1
Celebrations Fireworks, parades

Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada), formerly Dominion Day, is Canada's national holiday, marking the establishment of Canada as new federation with its own constitution on July 1, 1867. It is a federal holiday generally celebrated on July 1 annually by all provincial governments and most businesses across the country. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... This article is about federal states. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


A day off from work for most citizens and residents, Canada Day is Canada's main patriotic holiday, often a time for outdoor activities in the early Canadian summer. Frequently referred to as "Canada's birthday," particularly in the popular press,[1][2][3] the holiday celebrates the anniversary of Canada's creation as the first Dominion, through the 1867 British North America Act, which joined several British colonies into one self-governing federal polity, a kingdom in its own right.[4] However, the British Parliament at first kept limited rights of political control over the new country, which were shed by stages over the years until the last vestiges were ended in 1982, when the Constitution Act patriated the Canadian constitution. Canada Day thus differs from Independence Day celebrations in other countries, in that it does not commemorate a clear-cut date of complete independence. Patriotism is a feeling of love and devotion to ones own homeland (patria, the land of ones fathers). ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... The Constitution Act, 1982 (Schedule B of the Canada Act 1982 (U.K.)) is a part of the Constitution of Canada. ... For other uses, see Independence Day (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Canada Day marks the creation of the present polity of Canada on July 1, 1867, by the British North America Act, 1867, which joined the British colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the Province of Canada into a federation of four provinces, the colonial Province of Canada being divided, in the process, into the new Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec (see Canadian Confederation). is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Constitution Act, 1867 (formerly called the British North America Act, 1867, and still known informally as the BNA Act), constitutes a major part of Canadas Constitution. ... Motto: Munit Hae et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Largest metro Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto), French Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ...

Canada Day on Wellington Street, in front of the Château Laurier, in Ottawa
Canada Day on Wellington Street, in front of the Château Laurier, in Ottawa

On June 20, 1868, the Governor General, Lord Monck, issued a proclamation asking for Canadians to celebrate the anniversary of the confederation."[5] Download high resolution version (1505x988, 303 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1505x988, 303 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Château Laurier seen from Wellington Street. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... Viscount Monck, 1868 The Right Honourable Charles Stanley Monck, 4th Viscount Monck (October 10, 1819 – November 29, 1894) was the last Governor General of the Province of Canada and the first Governor General of Canada after Canadian Confederation. ...


The holiday was established statutorily 1879, and was originally called Dominion Day in reference to Canada's formal name, as it then was, and its standing as a dominion—essentially a polity within the British Empire—Canada being, in fact, the first of its kind. This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ...


Dominion Day was not a particularly prominent holiday in its early inceptions; in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many Canadians continued to think of themselves as primarily British, and were thus less interested in celebrating a distinctly "Canadian" form of patriotism. No official celebrations were held on July 1 from confederation until 1917, its golden anniversary, and then none again a further decade. This trend declined in the post-war era. Beginning in 1958, the Canadian government orchestrated Dominion Day celebrations, usually consisting of Trooping the Colours ceremonies on Parliament Hill in the afternoon and evening, followed by a mass band concert and fireworks display. Canada's centennial, July 1, 1967, is often seen as an important day in the history of Canadian patriotism, and in Canada's maturity as a distinct, independent country. After 1967, Dominion Day became far more popular with average Canadians. Into the late 1960s, nationally televised, multi-cultural concerts were added, and the fete became known as "Festival Canada". After 1980, the Canadian government began to promote the celebrating of Dominion Day beyond the national capital, giving grants and aid to cities across the country to help fund local activities. Mounted Bands at Trooping the Colour 2006. ... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


The name was officially changed to Canada Day on October 27, 1982, a move largely inspired by the adoption of the Canada Act, 1982, earlier in the year. However, many Canadians had already been informally referring to the holiday as "Canada Day" for a number of years before the official name change. is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Canada Act 1982 is an Act of Parliament passed by the British Parliament that severed virtually all remaining constitutional and legislative ties between the United Kingdom and Canada. ...


Activities

Canada Day celebrations in Iqaluit, 1999
Canada Day celebrations in Iqaluit, 1999
Queen Elizabeth II and her Prime Minister at the time, Jean Chrétien, at the official Canada Day celebration, Ottawa, 1997
Queen Elizabeth II and her Prime Minister at the time, Jean Chrétien, at the official Canada Day celebration, Ottawa, 1997

Most cities have organized celebrations. Municipal governments and community organizations usually organize high-profile public events for the day, such as parades, carnivals, festivals, barbecues, air and maritime shows, fireworks, and free musical concerts. Pancake breakfasts are common as well. As the day falls in July, Canada Day activities are frequently outdoors. Image File history File links Canada Day celebrations in Iqaluit, 1999. ... Image File history File links Canada Day celebrations in Iqaluit, 1999. ... Image File history File links EIIR-Chretien. ... Image File history File links EIIR-Chretien. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... Two pancakes with maple syrup. ...


Canada Day generally also includes patriotic celebrations. Many cities include a citizenship ceremony for new citizens. Canadian flags and red maple leaves abound, and some individuals paint their faces in Canadian national colours (red and white). The purpose of the Oath of Citizenship, as opposed to the Oath of Allegiance, is for new Canadian citizens to pledge their loyalty not only to the Sovereign, Queen Elizabeth II, as representative of the State, but also to the laws and customs of their new country. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leafed), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... National colours are frequently part of a countrys set of national symbols. ...


The celebrations in Ottawa are particularly large and lavish. Every Canada Day, hundreds of thousands gather on Parliament Hill to celebrate Canada. Official celebrations are held throughout the national capital region, including in Hull, with the main show taking place on Parliament Hill. This event is normally presided over by the Governor General, though the Queen, Elizabeth II, has attended Canada Day ceremonies in 1990, 1992, and 1997. The Queen also helped celebrate Canada's 100th anniversary on July 1, 1967. This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... For the hill in London, see Parliament Hill, London. ... Hull, Québec, as seen from Ottawa Hull is part of the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ... For the hill in London, see Parliament Hill, London. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch and head of state. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


In Montreal, while there are celebrations at the federally-funded Old Port, there is no government-organized Canada Day parade. It is a grassroots effort, which has at times been pressured to cease activity, even by federal officials.[6] Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Portland, Maines Old Port district, known for its cobblestone streets, 19th century brick buildings and fishing piers, is a top tourist destination. ...


Canada Day 2006 saw the first International Canada Day celebrations in Trafalgar Square, London, England. This is to be a yearly event, though its date does not always coincide with Canada Day due to the summer booking schedule of Trafalgar Square. Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ...


Detroit, Michigan, and Windsor, Ontario, have, since the 1950s, celebrated Dominion Day or Canada Day and the United States' Independence Day with the International Freedom Festival. A massive fireworks display over the Detroit River, the strait separating the two cities, is held annually with hundreds of thousands of spectators attending. Detroit redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Fourth of July redirects here. ... After poor management and inclement weather caused great losses in 2003, this festival no longer exists in its usual form on the Windsor side of the border. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ...


Exception

Under the federal Holidays Act, Canada Day is observed on July 1 unless that date falls on a Sunday, in which case July 2 is the statutory holiday, although celebratory events generally take place on July 1 even though it is not the legal holiday.


If it falls on a Saturday, the following Monday is generally also a day off for those businesses ordinarily closed on Saturdays.


Other Canadian observances on the same date

Quebec has Moving Day on July 1, because most leases there begin and end on that day, with many people changing residences. This article is about the Canadian province. ... Moving Day is a tradition in the province of Quebec, Canada. ...


In Newfoundland and Labrador, July 1 is also recognized as Memorial Day, a day of remembrance and sacrifice, commemorating the Newfoundland Regiment's heavy losses during World War I, at Beaumont Hamel, on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. Remembrance ceremonies similar to those held on Remembrance Day are held in the morning at cenotaphs around the province; flags are usually at half-mast (and the atmosphere somewhat more sombre) until noon, when normal Canada Day ceremonies start. This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The Royal Newfoundland Regiment is a militia unit of the Canadian Armed Forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Newfoundland Memorial at Beaumont Hamel Beaumont-Hamel is a commune of the Somme département, in northern France. ... Combatants British Empire United Kingdom Australia New Zealand South Africa Newfoundland India France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Henry Rawlinson Ferdinand Foch Fritz von Below Strength 13 British divisions 6 French divisions 6 divisions Casualties British: 57,470 French: 7,000 8,000 dead or wounded 2,200 prisoners The... Remembrance Day also known as Poppy Day, Armistice Day (the event it commemorates), or Veterans Day in the United States is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and of civilians in times of war, specifically since the First World War. ... The Cenotaph, London. ...


On Dominion Day of 1923, the Chinese Immigration Act was granted Royal Assent. Until the act was repealed in 1947, many Chinese-Canadians referred to July 1 as "Humiliation Day", closed shops on that day, and boycotted Dominion Day celebrations.[7] The Chinese Immigration Act, 1923, known in the Chinese-Canadian community as the Chinese Exclusion Act, was an act passed by the federal government of Canada, banning most forms of Chinese immigration to Canada. ... // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... Chinese Canadians are Canadians of Chinese descent and constitute the second-largest visible minority group in Canada, standing at 1,346,510 which comprises 3. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Canada Day
Wikinews
Wikinews has news related to this article:
  • Canada Day celebrated at Parliament Hill

Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Dominion Day is a commemoration day of the granting of national status in various Commonwealth countries. ... Moving Day is a tradition in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... A patriotic display in Toronto, ON, marks Flag Day. ... Canadian national holidays (with provincial exceptions)[1]: Each province of Canada has its own provincial holiday(s). ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Panetta, Alexander; Pedwell, Terry (2007-07-02). An unforgettable Canada Day, eh?. Toronto Star. Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  2. ^ Canada Day celebrations. Toronto Star (2007-06-29). Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  3. ^ Harper salutes international role in Canada Day address. National Post (2007-07-01). Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  4. ^ The Crown in Canada. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  5. ^ Canada Day. Department of Canadian Heritage. Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  6. ^ Hustake, Aalan (2008-05-25). Proud Canadian, proud Quebecer who loved a parade. The Gazette. Retrieved on 2008-05-25.
  7. ^ Chinese Immigration. CBC (2004-06-10). Retrieved on 2008-05-12.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Government of Canada is the federal government of Canada. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of Canadian Heritage, also referred to as Heritage Canada or simply Department of Heritage, is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for policies regarding the arts, culture, media, communications networks, and sports and multiculturalism. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Offices of The Gazette on Saint Catherine Street in Montreal The Gazette, often called the Montreal Gazette to avoid ambiguity, is the only English-language daily newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Cipher-block chaining ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Government of Canada site on Canada Day
  • National Capital Commission
  • Holidays Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. H-5

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In Newfoundland and Labrador, July 1 is recognized as a day of remeberence and sacrifice, and commemorates the Newfoundland Regiment's heavy losses during World War I, at Beaumont Hamel, on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
Remembrance ceremonies similar to those held on Remembrance Day are held in the morning at Cenotaphs around the province; flags are usually at half-mast (and the atmosphere somewhat more sombre) until noon, when normal Canada Day ceremonies start.
Under the Holidays Act, Canada Day is always observed on July 1 unless that date falls on a Sunday, in which case it is observed on July 2.
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