FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Canada 2001 Census

The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. Census day was May 15, 2001. On that day, Statistics Canada attempted to count every person in Canada. The total population count of Canada was 30,007,094. This was a 4% increase over 1996 Census of 28,846,761. In contrast, the official Statistics Canada population estimate for 2001 was 31,021,300. This is considered a more accurate population number than the actual count. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada is the Canadian federal government bureau commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


The following census was the 2006 Census. yet to come ...

Contents

Canada by the numbers

A summary of information about Canada.

Total Population 30,007,094
Dwellings 12,548,588
Men 14,706,850
Women 15,300,245
Median age 37.6 years
Average earnings $ 31,757

Census summary

Canada has experienced one of the smallest census-to-census growth rates in its population. From 1996 to 2001, the nation's population increased only 4.0%. The Census counted 30,007,094 people on May 15, 2001, compared with 28,846,761 on May 14, 1996.


Only three provinces and one territory had growth rates above the national average. Alberta's population soared 10.3%, Ontario gained 6.1% and British Columbia, 4.9%. Nunavut's population rose 8.1%. The population of Newfoundland and Labrador declined for the second consecutive census period. Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English (see below) Flower   Wild rose Tree Lodgepole Pine Bird Great Horned Owl Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages None Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages English de facto (none stated in law) Flower Pacific dogwood Tree Western Redcedar Bird Stellers Jay Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 36 6 Area... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Flower Purple Saxifrage Tree Bird Rock Ptarmigan Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson Premier Paul Okalik (Independent) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) 1 (Willie... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Official languages English Flower Pitcher Plant Tree Black Spruce Bird Atlantic Puffin Capital St. ...


Urbanization continued. In 2001, 79.4% of Canadians lived in an urban centre of 10,000 people or more, compared with 78.5% in 1996. Outside the urban centres, the population of rural and small-town areas declined 0.4%. The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities. ...


In 2001, just over 64% of the nation's population, or about 19,297,000 people, lived in the 27 census metropolitan areas (CMAs), up slightly from 63% in 1996. Seven of these 27 CMAs saw their populations grow at a rate of at least double the national average. The strongest rise, by far, occurred in Calgary. Calgary is the largest city in the province of Alberta, Canada. ...


From 1996 to 2001, the nation's population concentrated further in four broad urban regions: the extended Golden Horseshoe in southern Ontario; Montréal and environs; British Columbia's Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island; and the Calgary-Edmonton corridor. In 2001, 51% of Canada's population lived in these regions, compared with 49% in 1996. The skyline of Hamilton, Ontario The skyline of Toronto, Ontario. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ...


Population by province

Province 2001 Census 1996 Census % Change
Newfoundland and Labrador 512,930 551,792 -7.0
Prince Edward Island 135,294 134,557 0.5
Nova Scotia 908,007 909,282 -0.1
New Brunswick 729,498 738,133 -1.2
Quebec 7,237,479 7,138,795 1.4
Ontario 11,410,046 10,753,573 6.1
Manitoba 1,119,583 1,113,898 0.5
Saskatchewan 978,933 990,237 -1.1
Alberta 2,974,807 2,696,826 10.3
British Columbia 3,907,738 3,724,500 4.9
Yukon Territory 28,674 30,766 -6.8
Northwest Territories 37,360 39,672 -5.8
Nunavut 26,745 24,730 A 8.1

Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Official languages English Flower Pitcher Plant Tree Black Spruce Bird Atlantic Puffin Capital St. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti The Small Protected By The Great) Official languages English Flower Pink Ladys Slipper Tree Red Oak Bird Blue Jay Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor Barbara Oliver Hagerman Premier Pat Binns (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 4 4 Area Total  - Land  - Water... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Official languages none (English, French, Gaelic) Flower Mayflower Tree Red Spruce Bird Osprey Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 11 10 Area Total... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Official languages English, French Flower Purple Violet Tree Balsam Fir Bird Black-capped Chickadee Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 10 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages None Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English and French, per mandate of the Constitution Act 1982 Flower Prairie Crocus Tree White Spruce Bird Great Grey Owl Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 14... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Flower Western Red Lily Tree Paper Birch Bird Sharp-tailed Grouse Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English (see below) Flower   Wild rose Tree Lodgepole Pine Bird Great Horned Owl Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages English de facto (none stated in law) Flower Pacific dogwood Tree Western Redcedar Bird Stellers Jay Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 36 6 Area... Motto: none Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Whitehorse Largest city Whitehorse Commissioner Jack Cable Premier Dennis Fentie (Yukon Party) Area 482,443 km² (9th)  - Land 474,391 km²  - Water 8,052 km² (1. ... Motto: none Official languages Chipewyan, Cree, English, French, Gwich’in, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun, North Slavey, South Slavey, Tåîchô [1] Flower Mountain avens Tree Tamarack Bird Gyr Falcon Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government (no party affiliations)) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Flower Purple Saxifrage Tree Bird Rock Ptarmigan Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson Premier Paul Okalik (Independent) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) 1 (Willie...

Demographics

Mother tongue

Main article Language in Canada
Population by mother tongue of Canada's official languages: This article presents the current demolinguistics of Canada. ... First language (native language, mother tongue, or vernacular) is the language a person learns first. ...

Mother tongue Population
English 17,572,170
French 6,741,955
Bilingual 122,660
Other 5,202,240

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term bilingualism (from bi meaning two and lingua meaning language) can refer to rather different phenomena. ...

Aboriginal peoples

Population of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: Aboriginal peoples in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ...

Aboriginal Population 976,305
North American Indian 608,850
Métis 292,305
Inuit 45,070

First Nations is a common title used in Canada to describe the various societies of indigenous peoples of North America located in what is now Canada, who are not of Inuit or Métis descent. ... The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French or , in Michif ), also historically known as Bois Brule, Countryborn, or Black Scots, are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...

Ethnic origin

Main article: List of Canadians by ethnicity
Population by ethnic origin. Only those origins with more than 250,000 respondents are included here. This is based entirely on self reporting. Map of the dominant self-identified ethnic origins of ancestors per census division. ... The concept of ethnic origin is an attempt to classify people, not according to their current nationality, but according to where their ancestors came from. ...

Ethnic origins Total responses Single responses Multiple responses 2
Total population 29,639,035 18,307,540 11,331,490
Canadian 11,682,680 6,748,135 4,934,550
English 5,978,875 1,479,520 4,499,355
French 4,668,410 1,060,755 3,607,655
Scottish 4,157,210 607,235 3,549,975
Irish 3,822,660 496,865 3,325,800
German 2,742,765 705,595 2,037,170
Italian 1,270,370 726,275 544,090
Chinese 1,094,700 936,210 158,490
Ukrainian 1,071,060 326,200 744,860
North American Indian 1,000,890 455,805 545,085
Dutch (Netherlands) 923,310 316,220 607,090
Polish 817,085 260,415 556,670
African 731,044 Unknown Unknown
East Indian 713,330 581,665 131,665
Norwegian 363,760 47,230 316,530
Portuguese 357,690 252,835 104,855
Welsh 350,365 28,445 321,925
Jewish 348,605 186,475 162,130
Russian 337,960 70,890 267,070
Filipino 327,545 266,140 61,410
Métis 307,845 72,210 235,635
Swedish 282,760 30,440 252,320
Hungarian (Magyar) 267,255 91,795 175,460
American (USA) 250,010 25,200 224,805

English Canada is a term used to describe either: the anglophone residents of Canada or the Canadian provinces other than Quebec and, sometimes, New Brunswick, in which French is an official language of the provincial governments. ... Scottish-Canadian is an ethnic group in Canada with a population of 4,157,210 people, according to the 2001 Census of Canada data. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity used in Canada. ... Black Canadian is a term used to identify a Canadian of African descent. ... // Indo-Canadians are Canadians whose origin traces back to the nation of India. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Canada has the worlds fourth-largest Jewish population. ... The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French or , in Michif ), also historically known as Bois Brule, Countryborn, or Black Scots, are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ...

Religion

Main article: Religion in Canada
Population by religion. Only those religions with more than 250,000 respondents are included here. The census question was partly aided -- that is, the questionnaire form gave examples of some of the denominations but not others. The actual question asked is noted below. Canada has a wide mix of religions, but it has no official religion, and support for religious pluralism is an important part of Canadas political culture. ...

Religion Total responses % of Population
Roman Catholic 12,793,125 43.2
No religion 4,796,325 16.2
United Church 2,839,125 9.6
Anglican 2,035,500 6.9
Christian n.i.e. 780,450 2.6
Baptist 729,470 2.5
Lutheran 606,590 2.0
Muslim 579,640 2.0
Protestant n.i.e. 549,205 1.9
Presbyterian 409,830 1.4
Pentecostal 369,475 1.2
Jewish 329,995 1.1
Buddhist 300,345 1.0
Hindu 297,200 1.0
Sikh 278,410 0.9

The actual question asked: "What is this person's religion? Indicate a specific denomination or religion even if this person is not currently a practising member of that group. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth and his life, death, resurrection, and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church or any follower of Jesus Christ who believes that baptism is administered by the full immersion of a confessing Christian. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a religion that began in sixteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nanak and nine successive human gurus. ...


For example, Roman Catholic, Ukrainian Catholic, United Church, Anglican, Lutheran, Baptist, Greek Orthodox, Jewish, Islam, Buddhist, Hindu, Sikh, etc."


Visible minorities

Visible minority Total responses % of Population
Chinese 1,029,395 3.47
South Asian 917,070 3.09
Black 662,215 2.23
Filipino 308,575 1.04
Others 1,066,590 3.60
Not a visible
minority
25,655,185 86.56

Notable Indo-Canadians, past and present Actors and directors Deepa Mehta - Movie Director of films such as Bollywood, Hollywood Mira Nair - Movie Director of films such as Monsoon Wedding, Mississipi Masala, Kama Sutra : a Tale of Love [edit] Athletes Emmanuel Sandu - Figure Skater [edit] Musicians [edit] Comedians Shaun Majumder - A... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Age

Population by age:

Age Population
0-4 years 1,696,285
5-14 years 4,029,255
15-19 years 2,053,325
20-24 years 1,955,810
25-44 years 9,096,560
45-54 years 4,419,290
55-64 years 2,868,015
65-74 years 2,142,835
75-84 years 1,329,810
85 years and over 415,910

Methodology

Every person was legally required to return the census questionnaire that required answering basic demographic information. In addition randomly selected people were legally required to complete a much more detailed questionnaire.


On May 15, 2001, Statistics Canada had thousands of canvassers who went around to try and ensure that the entire population was counted. For the first time, this included canvassers who went to homeless shelters to ensure that the homeless were included in the census.


In addition to a small number of individuals who refused to participate, some first nation communities refused to participate en masse and therefore some of the statistics are inaccurate. This is noted as footnotes in many of the affected results.


Effects of Census

The census numbers are the basis of the federal governments transfer payments to the provinces and therefore when a province loses population, its transfer payments are decreased.


In addition, the census numbers are one of the elements that Elections Canada uses to create the boundaries of federal ridings. Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ...


See also

Demographics of Canada, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ...

External links

  • 2001 Census - Statistics Canada's page on the 2001 Census.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canada 2001 Census - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (645 words)
The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population.
From 1996 to 2001, the nation's population concentrated further in four broad urban regions: the extended Golden Horseshoe in southern Ontario; Montréal and environs; British Columbia's Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island; and the Calgary-Edmonton corridor.
The census numbers are the basis of the federal governments transfer payments to the provinces and therefore when a province loses population, its transfer payments are decreased.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m