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Encyclopedia > Canada's name
Detail from the current Canadian $20 bank note, issued in 2004.
Detail from the current Canadian $20 bank note, issued in 2004.
Detail from the defunct 25¢ note, in circulation until 1935. Today, the country is not commonly referred to as the 'Dominion of Canada'.

The name Canada has been in use since the earliest European settlement in Canada and originates from a First Nations word kanata for "settlement", "village", or "land". Today, Canada is pronounced /ˈkænədə/ in English and /kanada/ in French. In Inuktitut, one of the official languages of the territory of Nunavut, the First Nations word (pronounced /kanata/) is used, with the Inuktitut syllabics ᑲᓇᑕ. Image File history File links Cropped_20_dollar_bill. ... Image File history File links Cropped_20_dollar_bill. ... “C$” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Cropped_25_cent_bill. ... Image File history File links Cropped_25_cent_bill. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Government - Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson - Premier Paul Okalik (Consensus government) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) - Senate seats 1 (Willie Adams) Confederation... The Inuktitut syllabary (Inuktitut: ᑎᑎᕋᐅᓯᕐᒃ ᓄᑖᕐᒃ titirausiq nutaaq) is a writing system used by Inuit people in Nunavut and in Nunavik, Quebec. ...


The French colony of Canada, New France, was set up along the Saint Lawrence River and the northern shores of the Great Lakes. Later the area became two British colonies, called Upper Canada and Lower Canada until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841. Upon Confederation in 1867, the name Canada was officially adopted for the new Dominion, which was commonly referred to as the Dominion of Canada until after World War II. Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... TheSaint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Contents

Name origin

A map of North America ca. 1566, one of the first to include the name "Canada" (top right).

The name Canada originated around 1535 from the Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata meaning "village", "settlement",[1][2] or "collection of huts";[3][4] another contemporary translation was "land".[2] This Iroquoian language was spoken by the inhabitants of Stadacona and the neighbouring region near present-day Quebec City in the 16th century,[5] with words having similarities to those in related languages such as Mohawk (e.g., kaná:ta’, "town").[6][7] Jacques Cartier was first to use the word "canada" to refer not only to the village of Stadacona but also to the neighbouring region and to the Saint Lawrence River, which he called rivière de Canada. By 1545, European books and maps began referring to this region as Canada. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x640, 150 KB) Summary Il designo del discoperto della Nova Franza by Paolo Forlani, 1566 – source One of the first maps of North America to note the name Canada (pro. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x640, 150 KB) Summary Il designo del discoperto della Nova Franza by Paolo Forlani, 1566 – source One of the first maps of North America to note the name Canada (pro. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Territory occupied by the St. ... Iroquoian languages The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Mohawk is a Native American language spoken by the Mohawk nation in the United States and Canada. ... For other uses, see Jacques Cartier (disambiguation). ...


While the First Nations origin for the name Canada is now widely accepted, other possible explanations have been put forward in the past. One theory suggested that the name originated when Spanish explorers, not having explored the northern part of the continent, wrote acá nada ("nothing here") on that part of their maps.[4] First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ...

See also: List of place names in Canada of Aboriginal origin.

This list of place names in Canada of Aboriginal origin contains Canadian places whose names originate from the words of the First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, collectively referred to as Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ...

After the conquest of New France

After the British conquest of New France (including ceding of the French colony, Canada) in 1763, the colony was renamed as the Province of Quebec. Despite this, in the American Revolution their Articles of Confederation (1777) included a clause pre-authorizing the admission of "Canada" as a new state if it wished to join the U.S. Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Canada, was the name of the French colony along the St. ... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ...


Following the revolution and the influx of United Empire Loyalists into Quebec, the colony was split on 26 December 1791 into Upper and Lower Canada, sometime being collectively known as "The Canadas", the first time that the name "Canada" was used as the name of a colony. While Cartier used canadien to refer to the Iroquois residents of the colony, the term later came to be applied to French subjects born in Canada, and then to inhabitants of both colonies. The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... The Canadas were two British colonies, Upper Canada and Lower Canada, part of modern-day Canada. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ...


Upper and Lower Canada were merged into one colony, the Province of Canada, in 1841, based on the recommendations of the Durham Report. The former colonies were then known as Canada East and Canada West, and a single legislature was established with equal representation from each. Underpopulated Canada West opposed demands by Canada East for representation by population, but the roles reversed as Canada West's population surpassed the east's. The single colony remained governed in this way until 1 July 1867, often with coalition governments. A new capital city was being built at Ottawa, chosen in 1857 by Queen Victoria, and became a national capital. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as Lord Durhams Report, is an important document in the history of Quebec, Canada and the British Empire. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ...


Selection of the name Canada

At the conferences held in London to determine the form of confederation that would unite the Province of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec), the Province of New Brunswick and the Province of Nova Scotia, a delegate from either Nova Scotia or New Brunswick proposed the name Canada in February 1867, and it was unanimously accepted by the other delegates. There appears to have been little discussion,[8] though other names were suggested (see below). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... , Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867...


Adoption of Dominion

Canadian post card from 1905.
Canadian post card from 1905.

During the Charlottetown Conference of 1864, John A. Macdonald, who later became the first Prime Minister of Canada, talked of "founding a great British monarchy", in connection with the British Empire. He advocated, in the fourth Canadian draft of the British North America Act, the name "Kingdom of Canada,"[9] in the text is said: Image File history File links 1905_Canadian_coat_of_arms_postcard. ... Image File history File links 1905_Canadian_coat_of_arms_postcard. ... Delegates of the Charlottetown Convention The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...

The word 'Parliament' shall mean the Legislature or Parliament of the Kingdom of Canada.
The word 'Kingdom' shall mean and comprehend the United Provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick.
The words 'Privy Council' shall mean such persons as may from time to time be appointed, by the Governor General, and sworn to aid and advise in the Government of the Kingdom.[10]

Canada's founders, led by Sir John A. Macdonald wished their new nation to be called the "Kingdom of Canada". The Governor General at the time, Viscount Monk, supported the move to designate Canada a kingdom,[11] however, officials at the Colonial Office in London opposed this potentially "premature" and "pretentious" reference for a new country. They were also wary of antagonizing the United States, which had emerged from its Civil War as a formidable military power with unsettled grievances because of British support for the Confederate cause and thus opposed the use of terms such as kingdom or empire to describe the new country. For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... Viscount Monck, 1868 Charles Stanley Monck, 4th Viscount Monck (October 10, 1819 – November 29, 1894) was the last Governor General of the Province of Canada and the first Governor General of Canada after Canadian Confederation. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion...


As a result the term dominion was chosen to indicate Canada's status as a self-governing colony of the British Empire[citation needed], the first time it would be so used in reference to a country. This was an old British term for a type of government used in New England, and presumably resurrected for new purposes[citation needed]. It is reckoned that Sir Samuel Tilley suggested the term, inspired by Psalms 72:8 (from the King James Bible): "He shall have dominion also from sea to sea, and from the river unto the ends of the earth."[12] This is also echoed in Canada's motto: A mari usque ad mare (Latin for "from sea to sea"). This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Honourable Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley, PC (May 8, 1818 – June 25, 1896) was a Canadian politician. ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... Image:Antigua and barbuda coa. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


In a letter to Queen Victoria, Lord Carnarvon stated, "The North American delegates are anxious that the United Provinces should be designated as the 'Dominion of Canada.' It is a new title, but intended on their part as a tribute to the Monarchical principle which they earnestly desire to uphold."[13] The Rt Hon. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


However, in a letter to Lord Knutsford on the topic of the loss of the use of the word kingdom, Macdonald said:

"A great opportunity was lost in 1867 when the Dominion was formed out of the several provinces.
"The declaration of all the B.N.A. provinces that they desired as one dominion to remain a portion of the Empire, showed what wise government and generous treatment would do, and should have been marked as an epoch in the history of England. This would probably have been the case had Lord Carnarvon, who, as colonial minister, had sat at the cradle of the new Dominion, remained in office. His ill-omened resignation was followed by the appointment of the late Duke of Buckingham, who had as his adviser the then Governor General, Lord Monck - both good men, certainly, but quite unable, from the constitution of their minds, to rise to the occasion. Had a different course been pursued, for instance, had united Canada been declared to be an auxiliary kingdom, as it was in the Canadian draft of the bill, I feel sure almost that the Australian colonies would, ere this, have been applying to be placed in the same rank as The Kingdom of Canada."

He added as a postscript: The Rt Hon. ... The Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, by Carlo Pellegrini, 1875 Richard Plantagenet Campbell Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos GCSI, PC (10 September 1823–26 March 1889), usually shortened to Richard Temple-Grenville, was a British statesman of the 19th century, and a close friend... Viscount Monck, 1868 The Right Honourable Charles Stanley Monck, 4th Viscount Monck (October 10, 1819 – November 29, 1894) was the last Governor General of the Province of Canada and the first Governor General of Canada after Canadian Confederation. ...

"P.S. On reading the above over I see that it will convey the impression that the change of title from Kingdom to Dominion was caused by the Duke of Buckingham. This is not so. It was made at the instance of Lord Derby, then foreign minister, who feared the first name would wound the sensibilities of the Yankees. I mentioned this incident in our history to Lord Beaconsfield at Hughenden in 1879, who said, 'I was not aware of the circumstance, but it is so like Derby, a very good fellow, but who lives in a region of perpetual funk.'"[14]

Use of the term dominion was formalized in 1867 through Canadian Confederation. In the Constitution of Canada, namely the Constitution Act, 1867 (British North America Acts), the preamble of the Act indicates: The Rt Hon. ... Hughenden Valley (formerly called Hughenden or Hitchendon) is an extensive village in Buckinghamshire, England, just to the north of High Wycombe. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... The Constitution Act, 1867 (formerly called the British North America Act, 1867, and still known informally as the BNA Act), constitutes a major part of Canadas Constitution. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom dealing with the government of Canada, which was known as British North America until 1867. ...

Whereas the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the United Kingdom...

and section 3 indicates that the provinces:

... shall form and be One Dominion under the Name of Canada; and on and after that Day those Three Provinces shall form and be One Dominion under that Name accordingly.

In J. S. Ewart's two volume work, The Kingdom Papers,[15][16] it is noted that the following names were considered for the union of British North America: "The United Colony of Canada", "the United Provinces of Canada", and "the Federated Provinces of Canada".[17] Ewart was also an ardent advocate for the formation of "the Republic of Canada", a position which was rarely expressed in those times.[18]


French terms for Dominion

The French translation of the 1867 British North America Act translated "One Dominion under the Name of Canada" as "une seule et même Puissance sous le nom de Canada" using Puissance (power) as a translation for dominion. Later the English loan-word dominion was also used in French.


The Fathers of Confederation met at the Quebec Conference of 1864 to discuss the terms of this new union. One issue on the agenda was to determine the Union's "feudal rank" (see Resolution 71 of the Quebec Conference, 1864). The candidates for the classification of this new union were: "the Kingdom of Canada" (le Royaume du Canada), "the Realm of Canada" (le Realme du Canada), "the Union of Canada" (l'Union du Canada), and "the Dominion of Canada" (le Dominion du Canada). Delegates of the convention The Quebec Conference was the second meeting held in 1864 to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ...


Use of Canada and Dominion of Canada

Neither the term Dominion of Canada nor Dominion government appear in the 1867 Act; however, the former appears in the Constitution Act, 1871 — usage of which was "sanctioned"[19]— and both appear in other texts of the period, as well as on numerous Canadian bills before 1967.


Until the 1950s, the term Dominion of Canada was commonly used to identify the country. As Canada increasingly acquired political authority and autonomy from the United Kingdom, the federal government increasingly began using simply Canada on state documents. The government of Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent enacted a formal policy of removing the word "dominion" from all updated bills and statutes.[citation needed] Louis Stephen St. ...


The Canada Act 1982 refers only to Canada and, as such, it is currently the only legal (as well as bilingual) name. This was also reflected later in 1982 with the renaming of the national holiday from Dominion Day to Canada Day. Section 4 of the 1867 BNA Act declares that: Wikisource has original text related to this article: Canada Act 1982 The Canada Act 1982 (1982 c. ... Dominion Day is a commemoration day of the granting of national status in various Commonwealth countries. ... Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada) is Canadas national holiday, marking the establishment of Canada as a self-governing Dominion on July 1, 1867. ...

Unless it is otherwise expressed or implied, the Name Canada shall be taken to mean Canada as constituted under this Act.

and this has been interpreted to mean that the name of the country is simply Canada. No constitutional statute amends this name, and the subsequent Canada Act 1982 does not use the term dominion. However, the Canadian constitution includes the preceding BNA Acts, where the term is used; also, the Canada Act 1982 does not state that Canada is not a dominion. While no legal document ever says that the name of the country is anything other than Canada, Dominion and Dominion of Canada remain official titles of the country.[20][21][22]


In recent years the terms Dominion of Canada and Dominion are occasionally used to distinguish modern (post-1867) Canada from either the earlier Province of Canada or from the even earlier The Canadas. The terms are also used to distinguish the federal government from the provinces, though in this usage "federal" has become more common than "dominion". Among those who lament disuse of the term was the late Eugene Forsey, in response to what he and other monarchists consider increasing republicanism. However, the federal government continues to produce publications and educational materials that specify the currency of these official titles.[23][22] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Canadas were two British colonies, Upper Canada and Lower Canada, part of modern-day Canada. ... Hon. ... Canadian monarchists have historically celebrated the monarchy as a link to the United Kingdom, and thus a tie to Canadas British heritage. ... Canadian republicanism is the advocacy of constitutional change in Canada leading to the abolition of constitutional monarchy and the creation of a republic. ...


Other proposed names

While the provinces' delegates spent little time, if any, in settling on 'Canada' as the name for the new country, others proposed a variety of other names:[24]

  • Albion
  • Albionoria — "Albion of the north"
  • Borealia – from 'borealis', the Latin word for 'northern'; compare with Australia
  • Cabotia – in honour of Italian explorer John Cabot, who explored the eastern coast of Canada for England
  • Colonia
  • Efisga — an acronym of "English, French, Irish, Scottish, German, Aboriginal"
  • Hochelaga – an old name for Montreal
  • Laurentia
  • Mesopelagia — "land between the seas"
  • Norland
  • Superior
  • Tuponia — derived from 'The United Provinces of North America'
  • Transatlantica
  • Ursalia — "place of bears"
  • Vesperia — "land of the evening star"
  • Victorialand – in honour of Queen Victoria

Walter Bagehot of The Economist newspaper in London argued that the new nation should be called 'Northland' or 'Anglia' instead of Canada.[25] On these names, the statesman Thomas D'Arcy McGee commented, "Now I would ask any honourable member of the House how he would feel if he woke up some fine morning and found himself, instead of a Canadian, a Tuponian or a Hochelegander?" This article is about the archaic name for Great Britain. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Hochelaga was a St. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... Walter Bagehot (3 February 1826 – 24 March 1877), IPA (see [[1]]), was a nineteenth century British economist. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... McGee in 1868 Thomas DArcy McGee, PC, (April 13, 1825 – April 7, 1868) was a Canadian journalist and Father of Confederation. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Trigger, Bruce G.; Pendergast, James F. (1978). "Saint-Lawrence Iroquoians", Handbook of North American Indians Volume 15. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, pp. 357–361. OCLC 58762737. 
  2. ^ a b Rayburn, Alan (2001). Naming Canada: stories about Canadian place names, 2nd ed., Toronto: University of Toronto Press, pp. 13–4. ISBN 0-8020-8293-9. 
  3. ^ "New France is ..." Canadian Museum of Civilization
  4. ^ a b "Let's call it...Efisga" The Canadian Encyclopedia
  5. ^ Cartier, Jacques [1545] (2004-05-01). Relation originale de Jacques Cartier. Paris: Tross, p 48. 
  6. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Place Names of the United States. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, p. 78. 
  7. ^ Mithun, Marianne (1999). The Languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052129875X. 
  8. ^ Creighton, Donald. 1956. The Road to Confederation. Houghton Mifflin: Boston; p. 421.
  9. ^ Farthing, John; Freedom Wears a Crown; Toronto, 1957
  10. ^ Pope, Joseph; Confederation; pg. 177
  11. ^ Hubbard, R.H.; Rideau Hall; McGill-Queen’s University Press; Montreal and London; 1977; p. 9
  12. ^ "Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley" Library and Archives Canada.
  13. ^ Canadian Heritage: The Prince of Wales Royal Visit 2001, Quiz (Kids)
  14. ^ Senator Cools congratulates Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on her Forty-Seventh Anniversary of Accession to Throne, Feb 11, 1999
  15. ^ Ewart, J. S. 1912–7. The Kingdom Papers, Volume I. McClelland, Goodchild, and Stewart Publishers: Toronto; p. 331.
  16. ^ ibid; p. 393.
  17. ^ ibid; pp. 372–393; as per "Rank and Name," pp. 374–381.
  18. ^ ibid; Imperial Projects and the Republic of Canada, pp. 262–393.
  19. ^ Martin, Robert. 1993(?). 1993 Eugene Forsey Memorial Lecture: A Lament for British North America. The Machray Review. Prayer Book Society of Canada. — A summative piece about nomenclature and pertinent history with abundant references.
  20. ^ Marsh, James H., ed. 1988. "Dominion" The Canadian Encyclopedia. Hurtig Publishers: Toronto.
  21. ^ Rayburn, pp. 19, 21.
  22. ^ a b Canadian Heritage: National Flag of Canada Day, Canada's Digital Collections: Confederation 1867, Canadian Heritage: The Prince of Wales Royal Visit 2001, Quiz
  23. ^ Forsey, Eugene A. 2005. How Canadians Govern Themselves (PDF), 6th ed. Canada: Ottawa; pp. 8–9.
  24. ^ http://canadaonline.about.com/od/history/a/namecanada.htm
  25. ^ Moore, Christopher. 1997. 1867: How the Fathers Made a Deal. McClelland and Stewart: Toronto; p. 214.

Categories: Museums in Canada | Ottawa buildings | Canadian federal departments and agencies ... The Canadian Encyclopedia is the most authoritative resource on Canada. ... Library and Archives Canada (in French: Bibliothèque et Archives Canada) is a Canadian federal government department responsible for the collection and preservation of the documentary heritage of Canada through texts, pictures and other documents relevant to the culture of Canada and the politics of Canada. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hon. ...

Other sources

  • Choudry, Sujit. 2001(?). "Constitution Acts" (based on looseleaf by Hogg, Peter W.). Constitutional Keywords. University of Alberta, Centre for Constitutional Studies: Edmonton.
  • Forsey, Eugene A. 2005. How Canadians Govern Themselves (PDF), 6th ed. (ISBN 0-662-39689-8). Canada: Ottawa; pp. 8–9, 23.
  • Hallowell, Gerald, ed. 2004. The Oxford Companion to Canadian History. (ISBN 0-19-541559-0) Oxford University Press: Toronto; p. 183.
  • Rayburn, Alan. 2001. Naming Canada: Stories About Canadian Place Names, 2nd ed. (ISBN 0-8020-8293-9) University of Toronto Press: Toronto.
  • Acte Concenant l'Union et le Gouvernement du Canada, et de la Nouvelle-Ecosse, et de Nouveau Brunswick, Ainsi que les Objets qui s'y Rattachent (30e Victoria, Chap. 3) / An Act for the Union of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick and the Government Thereof; and for the Purposes Contected Therewith (30 Victoria, Cap 3), Typographie D'Augustin Cote, Quebec, Canada, pp. 209, (1868). French Preamble.

Peter Wardell Hogg, C.C., Q.C., Ph. ...

External links

  • "Dominion of Canada" FAQ

  Results from FactBites:
 
Canada - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (5490 words)
The Governor General of Canada, who exercises the prerogatives of the head of state (the monarch), the Prime Minister, who is the head of government, and the Leader of the Official Opposition have official residences in Ottawa.
Canada's head of state is the monarch, currently Elizabeth II and commonly referred to as the Queen of Canada.
Canada is known for its vast forests and mountain ranges (including the Rocky Mountains) and the animals that reside within them, such as moose, caribou, beavers, polar bears, grizzly bears, and the common loon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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