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Encyclopedia > Campania

Coordinates: 40°55′20″N, 14°44′48″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Campania
Geography
Status Region
Capital Naples
President Antonio Bassolino
(DS-Union)
Provinces Avellino
Benevento
Caserta
Naples
Salerno
Area 13,595 km²
 - Ranked 12th (4.5 %)
Population (2006 est.)
 - Total 5,790,929
 - Ranked 2nd (9.8 %)
 - Density 426/km²

Campania is a region of southern Italy located on the Italian Peninsula. It is bordered by Lazio to the northwest, Abruzzo and Molise to the north, Puglia to the northeast and Basilicata to the east. The Tyrrhenian Sea lies to the southwest and west and the small Flegrean Islands and Capri are also considered part of Campania. Campania can mean: Campania, a region of Italy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Antonio Bassolino. ... The Democrats of the Left (Democratici di Sinistra, DS) is the main Italian left-wing political party, part of the Olive Tree electoral coalition. ... The Union (Italian: LUnione) is an Italian centre-left political party coalition. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Montefalcione ... Benevento (It. ... Caserta (It. ... Naples (It. ... Salerno (It. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... Satellite view of the Peninsula in spring The Italian Peninsula or Apennine Peninsula (Italian: Penisola italiana or Penisola appenninica) is one of the greatest peninsulas of Europe, spanning 1,000 km from the Alps in the north to the central Mediterranean Sea in the south. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... “Abruzzi” redirects here. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... Apulia is a region of Italy (called Puglia in Italian), bordering on Molise to the north-west, Campania to the south-west, Basilicata to the south, the Adriatic Sea to the east and the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... Basilicata is a region in the south of Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Puglia (Apulia) to the east, Calabria to the south, it has one short coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea and another of the Gulf of Taranto in the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... For other uses, see Capri (disambiguation). ...


With an area of 13,595 km², Campania is only the twelfth largest region of Italy, but a population of around 5.8 million people[1] makes it the second most populous, and the most densely populated region in the country.


The name derives from Latin, as the Romans knew the region as Campania felix ("fortunate countryside"), a name that is shared by the French province of Champagne. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Location of the Champagne province in France Champagne is one of the most traditional provinces of France, a region of France that is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the regions name. ...

Contents

Geography

Campania is divided into five provinces:


Image File history File links Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1056 × 816 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Map of the provinces of the Campania region of Italy. ...

Avellino (Italian: Provincia di Avellino) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Benevento (Italian: Provincia di Benevento) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Caserta (Italian: Provincia di Caserta) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... The province of Naples (Italian: Provincia di Napoli) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Salerno (Italian: Provincia di Salerno) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ...

History

Roman theatre in ancient Pompei.

Campania was part of the Magna Graecia, the Greek colonies of southern Italy; the first Greek colony was founded at Cumae, north of present day Naples, in the 8th century BC. Etruscans and Samnites gave way to the expanding Roman Republic. In 217 BC Hannibal entered Campania and, by burning the crops of these fertile lowlands, hoped to provoke the Roman commander Fabius Maximus Cunctator (the delayer). Hannibal failed in his attempt; nor did he weaken Roman prestige enough to provoke any of the Campanian towns to rebel. Fabius, in turn, failed to trap Hannibal in Campania when Hannibal used the ruse of tying burning brands to the horns of cattle, so drawing off the force guarding a vital pass out of Campania. In 216 BC, however, after Hannibal's victory at the battle of Cannae, Capua, the leading city of Campania, wavered. They first requested complete equality with Rome, including the demand that one of the Roman consuls should be elected from Capua. When Rome rejected this, they opened negotiations with Hannibal who was more than willing to endorse the full independence they sought. The defection of Capua did not however inspire other Campanian towns so Capua was isolated. The Romans, in Hannibal's absence, were eventually able to build siege works round the city. As Hannibal proved unable to break the siege, Capua was eventually starved into submission in 211 BC. For the Roman ruins, see Pompeii Pompei is a city in the province of Naples (Campania, Italy). ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... Cumae (Cuma, in Italian) is an ancient Greek settlement lying to the northwest of Naples in the Italian region of Campania. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Samnite warriors Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 222 BC 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC 218 BC - 217 BC - 216 BC 215 BC... For other uses, see Hannibal (disambiguation). ... Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus (c. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC 218 BC 217 BC - 216 BC - 215 BC 214 BC... For the 11th century battle in the Byzantine conquest of the Mezzogiorno, see Battle of Cannae (1018). ... Capua is a city in the province of Caserta, (Campania, Italy) situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Napoli, on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. ... This article is about the Roman rank. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 216 BC 215 BC 214 BC 213 BC 212 BC - 211 BC - 210 BC 209 BC...


Campania was the breadbasket of Rome until the acquisition of Egypt brought greater supplies of grain, resulting in the conversion of smallholdings in Campania to the characteristic latifundia that lasted from the Empire to modern times. Goths and the Byzantine Empire struggled for control during the 5th and 6th centuries, followed by the Lombards, who established the Duchy of Benevento. The Normans (Robert Guiscard) conquered and re-unified Campania during the 11th and 12th centuries, seizing southern Italy from the Byzantines, forming the Kingdom of Sicily. After the Hohenstaufen confrontation with the Papacy, the kingdom passed to Charles of Anjou who retained his mainland territories after he lost Sicily (1282) as the Kingdom of Naples, reunited with Sicily by Alfonso V of Aragon (1442) who styled himself the 'King of Two Sicilies', a title that was subsequently revived during the Spanish domination (15041713) of both kingdoms. The Bourbons succeeded in 1713: prior to the unification of Italy, Campania formed part of the Bourbon Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. Latifundia are pieces of landed property covering tremendous areas. ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Duchy of Benevento was the southernmost Lombard duchy in medieval Italy, centred on Benevento, a city central in the Mezzogiorno. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Robert Guiscard (i. ... Flag The Kingdom of Sicily as it existed at the death of its founder, Roger II of Sicily, in 1154. ... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Capital Naples Government Monarchy King  - 1285-1309 Charles II  - 1815-1816 Ferdinand I History  - Established 1285  - Union with Sicily 1816 The Kingdom of Naples was an informal name of the polity officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily which existed on the mainland of southern Italy after of the secession... Alfonso V of Aragon (also Alfonso I of Naples) (1396 – June 27, 1458), surnamed the Magnanimous, was the King of Aragon and Naples and count of Barcelona from 1416 to 1458. ... Events The community of Rauma, Finland was granted its town rights. ... 1504 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Two Sicilies The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was the new name that the Bourbon king Ferdinand IV of Naples gave to his domain (including Southern Italy and Sicily) after the end of the Napoleonic Era and the full restoration of his power in 1816. ...


People

The people of Campania have a proud collective common history, however provincial identity takes precedence over their regional Campanian identity. For example, people from the province of Naples (which makes up over half of the total population of Campania) refer to themselves as Neapolitan before Campanian, there is a similar situation in the other Campanian provinces, for example with the people from the province of Salerno and the self-referential term Salernitan (or in their native language, Salernitani). Provincial has several meanings and may refer to: Provincial examinations: Bi-annual province-wide examinations for students between the grades of 10 to 12 in the province of British Columbia Anything related to a province, a formal geographical division; Anything related to the provinces, the parts of a country outside... A region can be any area that has some unifying feature. ... The province of Naples (Italian: Provincia di Napoli) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Neapolitan may refer to: Neapolitan, a resident of Naples, Italy Neapolitan language, a language of Naples and environs in southern Italy Neapolitan ice cream, a mixture of chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry ice cream side-by-side in the same container Neapolitan chord, in music, is the first inversion of a... Salerno (Italian: Provincia di Salerno) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ...


Demographics

Unlike central and northern Italy, in the last decade the region of Campania has not attracted large numbers of immigrants. The Italian national institute of statistics ISTAT estimated in January 2007 that 98,052 foreign-born immigrants live in Campania, equal to only 1.7% of the total regional population.[2] Part of the reason for this is in recent times, there have been more employment opportunities in northern regions than in the Southern Italian regions. In Campania there are sixteen cities and towns which have a population level above 50,000 people as of 2007, these are; ISTAT may refer to: the International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading, an aircraft standards organization. ... January 2007 is the first month of that year. ... ...

 
Comune Province Population
Naples Naples 973,022
Salerno Salerno 141,259
Giugliano in Campania Naples 111,289
Torre del Greco Naples 88,894
Pozzuoli Naples 83,167
Casoria Naples 80,945
Caserta Caserta 79,137
Castellammare di Stabia Naples 65,422
 
Comune Province Population
Afragola Naples 63,887
Benevento Benevento 62,940
Cava de' Tirreni Salerno 59,908
Avellino Avellino 56,908
Portici Naples 55,853
Ercolano Naples 55,663
Aversa Caserta 52,365
Acerra Naples 52,953
Battipaglia Salerno 50,942

Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... Giugliano in Campania is a town in the province of Napoli, Campania, Italy. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Pozzuoli is a city of the province of Napoli, in the Italian region of Campania. ... Country Italy Region Campania Province Province of Naples (NA) Mayor Elevation 70 m Area 12. ... Caserta, near Naples was certainly the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. ... Location of Castellammare di Stabia in the Gulf of Naples. ... Afragola is an important city of southern Italy. ... Benevento is a town and comune of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 50 km northeast of Naples. ... Cava de Tirreni is a town and commune of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 10 kilometers NW by rail from the town of Salerno. ... Avellino is a town and comune, capital of the province of Avellino in the Campania region of southern Italy. ... Portici is a city of Campania, Italy, in the Province of Naples, 5 miles southeast of Naples by railway, on the shores of the bay, and at the foot of Vesuvius. ... Ercolano is a town and commune in the province of Naples, Campania (Italy). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Acerra is a city of Campania, Italy, about 9 miles north-east of Naples, in the Naples country. ... Battipaglia is a town and comune in the province of Salerno in the Campania region of south-western Italy. ...

Food

The pizza in its modern aspect and taste was born in Naples. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see Pizza (disambiguation). ...


Historical and original pizza from Naples are pizza fritta (fried pizza), with or without being stuffed with ricotta cheese; if stuffed it is called Calzone (like single part of trousers); pizza Marinara (pizza seamans'style), with just olive oil, tomato sauce and garlic; and the queen of all pizza, the pizza Margherita with olive oil, tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese and some basil leaves. Ricotta cheese is an Italian cheese made from the whey which results when making cheeses such as mozzarella or provolone. ... A calzone (Italian stocking or pants (not used frequently for pants: pantaloni is the modern usage for the word pants, plural calzoni), sometimes referred to as a stuffed or folded pizza, is an Italian turnover made from pizza dough and stuffed with cheese and marinara sauce (usually mozzarella cheese and... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... ... For other uses, see Basil (disambiguation). ...


Spaghetti is a well known dish from southern Italy and Campania. Neapolitans were among the first Europeans to use tomatoes not only as ornamental plant, but also as food and garnishment. For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Solanumlycopersicum Linnaeus ref. ...


Campania is also home to Lacryma Christi, Fiano, Aglianico, Greco di Tufo, Pere 'e palomma, Ischitano, Taburno, Solopaca, Taurasi wines. Lacryma Christi, literally tear of Christ, is the name of a celebrated Neapolitan kind of wine produced near the Vesuvio volcano in Campania, Italy. ... Fiano may refer to: Fiano (TO), a town in Piedmont, Italy Fiano Romano, a town in Lazio, Italy Category: ... Aglianico is a red wine grape grown in the Campania and Basilicata regions of Italy. ... Solopaca is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Benevento in the Italian region Campania, located about 45 km northeast of Naples and about 20 km northwest of Benevento. ... Taurasi is a town (commune) in the province of Avellino, Campania, Italy. ...


Campania is regarded throughout Italy as the producer of the best Mozzarella di Bufala (Mozzarella made from buffalo milk), fiordilatte (flower of milk) made from cow milk, ricotta from sheep or buffalo, provolone from cow milk, and caciotta made from goat milk. Buffalo cattle are in Salerno and Caserta. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Ricotta cheese is an Italian cheese made from the whey which results when making cheeses such as mozzarella or provolone. ... Species See text. ... Look up buffalo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Provolone cheese is an Italian cheese, very similar to mozzarella cheese, which is traditionally used on submarine sandwiches. ... Caciotta is a kind of cheese produced in many regions of Italy from the milk of cows, sheep, goats or water buffalo. ... Look up buffalo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... Caserta, near Naples was certainly the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. ...


Mozzarella is very famous for being soft and chewy cheese and melts gently if exposed to heat. It just smells and tastes like milk, so it is appreciated for not having a foul smell. The cheese is becoming more popular and there are increasing numbers of mozzarella producers all over the world, in USA, in Australia, and even in China where cheese it is not very appreciated due to genetic reasons (2 out of 3 people lose their capability to digest lactose) during there adult-hood. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Lactose is a disaccharide that consists of β-D-galactose and β-D-glucose molecules bonded through a β1-4 glycosidic linkage. ...


Cakes and pies from Campania are very famous. The pastiera pie it is made in the Easter period. Also casatiello and tortano are Easter bread-cakes made adding pork grease and/or oil to the dough of the bread and are garnished with chops of salami and various chops of cheese mixed and cooked with the bread. This article needs to be wikified. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Salami Salami is cured sausage, fermented and air-dried. ...


The babà cake it is a well known Neapolitan gourmandise, best served with Rum or limoncello liquor. It is an old Austrian cake which arrived in Campania during Austrian domination of the Kingdom of Naples and here was modified to became a "walking cake" for citizens always in hurry for work and other occupations. A rum baba or baba au rhum is a small yeast cake saturated in liquor, usually rum, and sometimes filled with cream. ... Caribbean rum, circa 1941 Rum is a distilled beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses and sugarcane juice by a process of fermentation and distillation. ... Limoncello [limontlːo] is a lemon liqueur produced in the south of Italy, mainly in the region around the Gulf of Naples and the coast of Amalfi and Islands of Ischia and Capri, but also in Sicily, Sardinia and the Maltese island of Gozo. ... Capital Naples Government Monarchy King  - 1285-1309 Charles II  - 1815-1816 Ferdinand I History  - Established 1285  - Union with Sicily 1816 The Kingdom of Naples was an informal name of the polity officially known as the Kingdom of Sicily which existed on the mainland of southern Italy after of the secession...


The sfogliatella is another pasty cake from Amalfi Coast. Last century it became famous throughout Italy, and now is beginning to be known worldwide as well as are becoming famous the zeppole cake. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with sfogliatelle. ... The Amalfi Coast, or Costiera Amalfitana in Italian, is a stretch of coastline on the southern side of the Sorrentine Peninsula of Italy (Province of Salerno), extending from Positano in the west to Vietri sul Mare in the east. ...


Limoncello is a world renowned liquor invented in the Sorrento peninsula. Limoncello [limontlːo] is a lemon liqueur produced in the south of Italy, mainly in the region around the Gulf of Naples and the coast of Amalfi and Islands of Ischia and Capri, but also in Sicily, Sardinia and the Maltese island of Gozo. ...


Struffoli, little balls fried dough dipped in honey, are enjoyed during the Christmas holidays. A pignolata from Calabria, with both chocolate and vanilla icing. ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ...


Zeppole, which is eaten on Saint Joseph's day is another cake enjoyed around the world. Zeppole (singular Zeppoli) or St. ... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ...


Derived from some similar dishes from France, other famous Campanian dishes are also the so called Russian salad made of potatoes in mayonnaise garnished with shrimps and vegetables in vineger. Strange to know the Russians call this dish Olivier Salad and the Germans called it italian salad. Also from France domination comes the "gattò" or "gateau di patate" (pie made of boiled potatoes cooked in oven). Russian salad or salade russe is a composed salad of diced vegetables and sometimes meats bound in mayonnaise. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Suborders Not necessary complete list: Aristeidae Penaeidae Sergestidae Sicyoniidae Solenoceridae Nematocarcinidae Atyidae Pasiphaeoidae Rhynocinetidae Campylonotidae Palaemonidae Alpheidae Ogyrididae Hippolytidae Proussidae Pandalidae Crangonidae True shrimp are small, swimming, decapod crustaceans usually classified in the suborder Natantia, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ...


Fish-based dishes, such as "insalata di mare" (sea salad), "zuppa di polpo" (boiled soup of octopus), "zuppa di cozze" (soup of mussels), are popular. Another dish is "frittelle di mare" (fritters with seaweed), made with edible poseidonia algae. There are a number of famous dishes made with, such as "triglie al cartoccio" (red mullet in the bag), and "alici marinate" (raw anchovyies in olive oil). The island of Ischia is famous for its fish dishes as well as cooked rabbit. Paestum is the classical Roman name of a major Graeco-Roman city in the Campania region of Italy. ...


Campania is home to the beautiful and tasty lemons of Sorrento, which were much loved by German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: For other uses, see Sorrento (disambiguation). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ...

"Kennst du das Land, wo die Zitronen blühn?" ("Do you know the land where the lemon-trees bloom?), Goethe, Mignon.

Also from Campania are the friarielli or friggiarelli vegetables. Friarielli are a different kind ofbroccoli that taste bitter. This gives this vegetable an intense taste, and make it good to be fried and often served with sausages. Friarielli have big leaves which are eaten instead of the flowers which are smaller if compared with common broccoli. Broccoli is a plant of the Cabbage family, Brassicaceae (formerly Cruciferae). ...


Famous worldwide are the nuts of Campania from Salerno and Benevento.


Campanian cuisine distinguish itself into various typical zones, Neapolitan is rich of seafood; Salernitan, which mix up mountain and sea; Benevantan and Avellinese from inner and mountain land; Casertan and Aversana rich of fresh vegetables and mozarella cheese; Cilento cuisine typical of the foremost south of Campania; Sorrento cuisine which melts together the cuisine from Naples and from Salerno, and the mountain ones, because Sorrento peninsula it is a mountain which elevates up to from the sea.


Calitrian cuisine is renowned in the region of Campania for being very tasty and rather spicy. Typical hand-made pasta dishes include cingul', the local dish par excellence. This is short, twirly pasta boiled and then served with a thick, tasty tomato sauce. Other varieties of pasta with the same sauce include lahan' and aurecchi' r' preut'- (priest’s ears in the local dialect). Others are annazze', served with delicious hot tomato sauce and pecorino cheese; and sciliend' (a special vermicelli-like pasta) with a condiment of garlic-fried oil and hot chili pepper.


Culture

Campania and Naples are famous through the centuries. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


From Greek colony of Elea nowadays named Velia in Campania were the philosophers of the Pre-Socratic philosophy school, Parmenides and Zeno of Elea Their time was about in 490 - 480 B.C. Zeno was famous for his paradoxes and called by Aristotle the inventor of the dialectic. Elea (Velia by the Romans; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was a Greek coastal city founded around 540 BC in Lucania in southern Italy, 15 miles southeast of the Gulf of Salerno. ... Velia is an ancient town of Lucania (present Basilicata), Italy, on the hill now crowned by the medieval castle of Castellainmare della Bruca, 440 ft. ... The Pre-Socratic philosophers were active before Socrates or contemporaneously, but expounding knowledge developed earlier. ... Parmenides of Elea (Greek: , early 5th century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Elea, a Hellenic city on the southern coast of Italy. ... Zeno of Elea (IPA:zɛnoʊ, ɛlɛɑː)(circa 490 BC? – circa 430 BC?) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of southern Italy and a member of the Eleatic School founded by Parmenides. ... “Arrow paradox” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... In classical philosophy, dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is controversy, Viz. ...


Latin poet Virgilius (70 B.C. - 19 B.C.) loved Campania very much, so much that he decided to establish in Naples. Many parts of his epic poem and immortal masterpiece Aeneid are located in Campania. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story...


Ancient scientist Plinius Pliny the elder who wrote a "Naturalis Historia" ("Pliny's History of the Nature") studied the Volcano Vesuvius and was poisoned and killed by gas emitted from the volcano during the famous eruption in 79 A.D. Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ...


His nephew Pliny the younger eventually survived and described the eruption and the death of his uncle in a famous letter to one of his friends. Gayus Plinius Colonoscopy Caecilius Secundus (63 - ca. ...


In Naples in 476 A.D. circa died last emperor of western empire of Rome Romulus Augustus, prisoner of German general Odoacer. This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Artist Giotto in middle age made some fresco paints in Castel Nuovo. Unfortunately these paintings were destroyed by an earthquake. There are several things that have been named Giotto: Giotto di Bondone an Italian painter. ... Castel Nuovo. ...


In the end of middle age, the medical school of Salerno which combined ancient Roman and Greek medicine with recent discoveries of Arab medicine was known in all Europe. Its methods were then adopted in all the continent. It could be reckognized as being almost the first university in whole Europe, but as there are no certain documents that it was organized like a modern university as we known it, then the preeminence of being the first modern university in the world it tooks to "Alma Mater Studiorum" University in Bologna. Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second largest university in Italy. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ...


Boccaccio poet from Tuscany visited various time Naples, and described it vivid into Decameron as dissolute city. He had a love story with a noble woman close to King of Naples. Giovanni Boccaccio (June 16, 1313 - December 21, 1375) was a Florentine author and poet, the greatest of Petrarchs disciples, an important Renaissance humanist in his own right and author of a number of notable works including On Famous Women, the Decameron and his poems in the vernacular. ... The Decameron is a collection of novellas that was finished by Giovanni Boccaccio in 1353. ...


Famous in 1500 is the big book tale named "Lo cunto de li cunti" by Giovan Battista Basile. Giambattista Basile Giambattista Basile (1566 or 1575–February 23, 1632) was an Italian poet, courtier, and fairy tale collector. ...


In 1570 the famous writer Cervantes who wrote romance "Don Quixote" served as Spanish soldier a period in Naples. he said of the city that it was the beauties city he had ever visited. Cervantes can refer to: Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote Francisco Cervantes de Salazar, 16th-century man of letters Cervantes, Ilocos Sur, a municipality in the Philippines Cervantes, a town in Western Australia Cervantes de Leon, a character in the Soul Calibur series of fighting games This is a... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ...


Literate and poet Torquato Tasso author of the epic poem la "Gerusalemme Liberata" was born in Sorrento in 1575. The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Jerusalem Delivered (La Gerusalemme liberata) 1580) is a baroque epic poem by Torquato Tasso which tells the (largely fictionalized) story of the First Crusade in which Christians knights, lead by Godfrey of Bouillon, battle Muslims in order to raise the siege of Jerusalem. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


The first modern description and studies on the of the "camera obscura" ("dark chamber"), are firmly established in Italy with the availability of Giovanni Battista della Porta in its masterpiece Magiae Naturalis, ("Natural Magic") in 1558 . These studies then led to construction of first photocameras in 1850 circa by French scientists Niepce and Daguerre. The camera obscura (Lat. ... Giambattista della Porta. ... Magiae Naturalis (in English, Natural Magic) is a work of popular science by Giambattista della Porta first published in Naples in 1558. ... Nicéphore Niépces earliest surviving photograph, circa 1826 Joseph Nicéphore Niépce (March 7, 1765 – July 5, 1833) was a French inventor, most noted as a pioneer in photography. ... Louis Daguerre Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (1787 - 1851) was the Basque artist and chemist who is recognized for his invention of the Daguerreotype process of photography. ...


Phliosoper Giordano Bruno was born in Nola. He was the first to teorize infinte suns and infinite worlds in the universe. He was burnt in Rome by Inquisition in 1600. Giordano Bruno Giordano Bruno (1548, Nola – February 17, 1600, Rome) was an Italian philosopher, priest, cosmologist, and occultist. ... For other uses, see Nola (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Of 1630 circa it is the first modern song of europen music history "Michelemmà".


In 1606 ca. the famous painter Caravaggio established his studio in Naples. His life was really riotus. He was even harmed in a riot in 1609 near Cerriglio inn. For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ...


Famous Italian architect Cosimo Fanzago from Bergamo decided to live his life in Naples. Cosimo Fanzago (1591-1678) was an Italian Baroque Sculptor active in Naples. ... Small street (via della Noca) leading to città alta. ...


In period of 1700 Naples was the last city to be visited by literate and philosopes who enterprised the "Grand Tour" which was the big touring (looping) voyage to visit all the important cultural sites of the European continent.


Italian architect Luigi Vanvitelli son of Dutch architect Kaspar van Wittel build the Kingdom Palace in Caserta in 1750 circa. He contributed to the construction of many neoclassic-style palaces in which the nobles of Naples spent their holidays. These palaces are now known worldwide as "Ville Vesuviane". Luigi Vanvitelli (Naples, May 12, 1700 – March 1, 1773, Caserta), an engineer as well as the most prominent 18th-century Italian architect, practiced a sober classicizing academic Late Baroque style that made an easy transition to Neoclassicism. ... Caserta, near Naples was certainly the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. ...


Raimondo di Sangro, prince of Sansevero, was a scientist and one of the last alchemists.


German writer Goethe visited Campania and Naples in 1786 and was amazed by the beauty of it. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ...


German archaeologist Johann Joachim Winckelmann also visited Naples, Paestum, Herculaneum and Pompeii in 1748 and later, studying how where conducted acheological surveys in kingdom of Naples. He was one of the first to study drawings, statues, stones, and ancient burned scrolls made of papyrus found in the excavations of city of Herculaneum. His masterpiece, the "Geschichte der Kunst des Alterthums" ("History of Ancient Art"), published in 1764, was soon recognized as a significant contribution to European literature. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Archaeological excavations in Pompeii were initiated by King Charles III of Naples in 1748. He issued the first modern laws in Europe to protect, defend and preserve archaeological sites.


Famous Neapolitan musicians of that period are Niccolò Antonio Zingarelli and Giovanni Paisiello. Niccolò Antonio Zingarelli (1752-1837) was a composer, born in Naples, Italy on April 4, 1752. ... Paisiello at the clavichord, by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, 1791. ...


Musician Rossini lived many years in Naples, where he wrote numerous compositions. Gioacchino Antonio Rossini (February 29, 1792 — November 13, 1868) was an Italian musical composer who wrote more than 30 operas as well as sacred music and chamber music. ...


Italian poet and writer Giacomo Leopardi established his home in Naples and Torre del Greco lived there at the end of his young brief life. It was there that hhe wrote the Ode to the Ginestra flower. He died in Naples in 1837 . Giacomo Leopardi, Count (June 29, 1798 – June 14, 1837) is generally considered, along with such figures as Dante, Petrarca, Ariosto and Tasso, to be among Italys greatest poets and one of its greatest thinkers. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Ginestra is a town and comune in the province of Potenza, in the Southern Italian region of Basilicata. ...


The first volcano observatory, the Vesuvius Observatory, was founded in Naples in 1841. A volcano observatory is an institution that conducts research and monitoring of a volcano. ...


Geologist Giuseppe Mercalli, born in Milan in 1850, was one of the most famous directors of Vesuvius Observatory. He invented in 1902 the first scientific method to study the effects of an earthquake, the Mercalli intensity scale (also known as MCS, MWM or recently MM). The scale quantifies the effects of an earthquake on the Earth's surface, humans, objects of nature, and man-made structures on a scale of 1 through 12, with 1 denoting a weak earthquake and 12 one that causes almost complete destruction. It represents the results of an earthquake as reported by human eye and considering only the surface of the earth, so it became quickly obsolete and replaced by Richter Magnitude Scale which quantifies the real amount of energy of the seismic movements. Nothwithstanding of this fact the Mercalli scale is still useful to quantify the damages of an earthquake. He died in the fire of his house in 1914.[citation needed] British statesman William Ewart Gladstone (1809-98), exposed in newspaper articles the horrors of the prison system of the Kingdom of Naples in the mid-nineteenth century. His pamphlets gave enormous help to the cause of re-unification of Italy in 1861 and increase notheworthy his reputation in homeland, as representative of the British Parliament to be then elected as Prime Minister. It was later discovered that he never visited any neapolitan prison, neither investigated upon that jail system. He simply reported voices and wannabe testimoniances. These articles, containing a long list of absurd lies and propagandistic inventions, and probably were made to support invasion and annexion of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies by the Kingdom of Piedmont, with the following foundation of modern Italy. Giuseppe Mercalli (born May 21, 1850) was an Italian volcanologist. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... The Mercalli intensity scale is a scale used for measuring the intensity of an earthquake. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ...


French writer Alexandre Dumas, père was directly involved in the process of re-unification of Italy, and sojourned two or three years in Naples, where he wrote many historical novels regarding that city. He was also a known newspaper correspondent. Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ...


Francesco de Sanctis, writer, literate, politician and two times Minister of Instructions after re-unification of Italy in 1861, was born in Morra de Sanctis near Benevento. Francesco de Sanctis (March 28, 1817 – December 29, 1883) was an Italian literary critic, considered the most important scholar of Italian language and literature in the 19th century. ...


German scientist Anton Dohrn founded in Naples the first public aquarium in the world and laboratory of study of the sea known as Maritime Zoological Station. Felix Anton Dohrn, (b. ...


Also famous is Astronomic Observatory of Capodimonte founded by King Gioacchino Murat general of French emperor Napoleon in 1816. The observatory it is now the site hosts the Italian Laboratory of Astrophisics. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


We remember also the Botanic Garden of Naples and again the Geological Station of the Volcano Vesuvius.


Doctors and surgeons Antonio Cardarelli, and Giuseppe Moscati were ensign representatives of the medicine studies in Naples. Their life was an example for all city and the entire nation. Saint Giuseppe Moscati (July 25, 1880 – April 12, 1927) was an Italian doctor, scientific researcher, and university professor noted both for his pioneering work in biochemistry and for his piety. ...


Doctor Giuseppe Moscati, for his extraordinary devout and religious life and his care to the poors of Naples was first declared "Blessed" by Roman Church in 1975, and proclaimed "Saint" by Pope John Paul II in 1987. Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Famous worldwide are the schools of sightseeing pictures known as "School of Posillipo" and "School of Resina" out of period from 1800-1900 circa. There were famous painters like Giacinto Gigante, Raffaele Carelli, Teodoro Duclère, Achille Vianelli, Vincenzo Franceschini, Alessandro La Volpe, Giuseppe Bonolis, Giuseppe Fagnani, Salvatore Fergola, Emile-Jean-HoraceVernet, Gonsalvo Carelli, Achille Carelli, Giuseppe Carelli, Filippo Palizzi, Nicola Palizzi, Federico Cortese, Simone Campanile, Domenico Morelli, Saverio Altamura, Giuseppe De Nittis, Francesco Sogliano, Michele Cammarano, Eduardo Dalbono, Vincenzo Gemito, Antonio Mancini, Gennaro della Monica, Raffaello Pagliaccetti, Teofilo Patini, Francesco Paolo Michetti, Costantino Barbella, Pasquale Celommi, Gaetano Esposito, Giuseppe Casciaro, Federico Maldarelli, Giuseppe De Simone. Giacinto Gigante (Naples, 1806- Naples,1876) Italian painter. ... Domenico was a very talented painter. ... Giuseppe De Nittis (February 25, 1846 – August 12, 1884) was an Italian painter whose work merges the styles of Salon art and Impressionism. ... Vincenzo Gemito,  (July 16, 1852 - March 1, 1929) was a Neapolitan sculptor and artist who was considered both genius and insane, but whose works are highly prized by international galleries and collectors today. ... Antonio Mancini self-portrait in pastel Antonio Mancini (1852-1930) was an Italian painter. ...


Amongst the painters who inspired directly these schools, we remember Salvator Rosa, Pierre Jacques-Antoine Volaire who became famous for his gouaches, Anton Sminck van Pitloo who preferred to live his remaining life in Naples. self-portrait by Salvator Rosa, 1640. ...


In the begin of the 20th century Naples was the capital of Cinema in Italy, before than Rome and then Milan. Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN...


Very important Italian movies of the origins were played in Naples, such as Assunta Spina from a novel of Salvatore di Giacomo. Assunta Spina is one of the masterpieces of Italian silent film, released in 1915. ... Salvatore Di Giacomo (March 12, 1860 – April 4, 1934) was a Neapolitan poet, songwriter and playwright. ...


The world renowned opera singer Enrico Caruso was also a native of Naples. For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ...


In Capri lived for a certain time the Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir I. Lenin. For other uses, see Capri (disambiguation). ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a Russian revolutionary, the leader of the Bolshevik party, the first Premier of the Soviet Union, and the founder of the ideology of Leninism. ...


From Naples came the mathematician Renato Caccioppoli, nephew of Russian anarchic revolutionary Michael Bakunin. Born in 1904 he committed suicide in 1959. His life was represented in a movie "Morte di un matematico napoletano" ("Death of a neapolitan mathematician") by Mario Martone in 1992. Renato Caccioppoli (1904-1959) was a noted Italian mathematician, born 20 January 1904, died by suicide on 8 May 1959 at his home in Palazzo Cellammare. ... Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian — Михаил Александрович Бакунин), (May 30, 1814–June 13, 1876) was a well-known Russian anarchist contemporaneous to Karl Marx. ...


The first President of the Italian Republic in 1946 (with a pro-tempore mandate of six months) was lawyer Enrico De Nicola from city of Torre del Greco. He was famous for his studies regarding the Constitutions. Enrico De Nicola (Naples, November 9, 1877 - Torre del Greco, Naples, October 1, 1959) was an Italian jurist, journalist, politician, and the first provisional Head of State of the newborn republic in 1946-1948. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Campania gave two other Presidents to Italy: Giovanni Leone was various times Prime Minister and then becme elected the 6th President of the Republic; and the actual 11th President Giorgio Napolitano. Curiosity: President Napolitano is a former representative of Italian Communist Party (PCI). Giovanni Leone (November 3, 1908 – November 9, 2001) was an Italian politician. ... Giorgio Napolitano (born June 29, 1925), is an Italian politician and former lifetime senator, the eleventh and current President of the Italian Republic. ... The three-letter abbreviation PCI may refer to: // Project Concern International A Humanitarian Organization Peripheral Component Interconnect — standard specifies a computer bus for attaching peripheral devices to a computer motherboard. ...


20th century most known philosoper and literate in Naples was Benedetto Croce, famous for his studies in aesthetics, ethics, logic, economy, history, politics. Benedetto Croce (February 25, 1866 - November 20, 1952) was an Italian critic, idealist philosopher, and politician. ... Aesthetics is commonly perceived as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... Logic (from Classical Greek λόγος logos; meaning word, thought, idea, argument, account, reason, or principle) is the study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ...


Famous Neapolitan artists, actors, playwriters, and showmen were Eduardo De Filippo worldwide known for its theatre works such as "Filumena Marturano" (filumena), and "Questi fantasmi" (a.k.a. "Souls of Naples)", Peppino De Filippo and their sister Titina De Filippo. Eduardo De Filippo was an actor, playwright, screenwriter, author and poet born May 24, 1900 in Naples, Italy and passed away on October 31, 1984 in Rome. ... Filumena Marturano is one of the most important plays of the Italian playwright and philosopher, Eduardo De Filippo. ... Peppino De Filippo (August 24, 1903 - January 27, 1980) was an Italian actor. ... Titina De Filippo Titina De Filippo (Titina short for Annunziata) was an actress, playwright, born March 27, 1898 in via Dell Ascensione a Chiaia, Naples, Italy and passed away on December 26, 1965. ...


The prince Antonio de Curtis was one of the most important actors in Naples in the 20th century. Known around the world by his art nickname of Totò he worked with Pier Paolo Pasolini in the movie "Uccellacci e uccellini". He is also known for the song "Malafemmena". Antonio De Curtis Totò was the stage name of Antonio de Curtis (born Antonio Clemente, February 15, 1898, Naples – April 15, 1967, Rome), an Italian actor, writer, and songwriter. ... Antonio De Curtis Totò was the stage name of Antonio de Curtis (born Antonio Clemente, February 15, 1898, Naples – April 15, 1967, Rome), an Italian actor, writer, and songwriter. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. ... The Hawks and the Sparrows is a 1966 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ...


Pop artist Andy Warhol created two famous paintings ofIrpinia Earthquake of 1980: Fate presto and Vesuvius. Both originals are hosted in the exhibit Terrae Motus in King's Palace of Caserta. Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Iripina is the region in the Appennino mountains around Avellino, a town in South Italy about 40km eastward from Naples. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio) is a volcano east of Naples, Italy, located at 40°49′N 14°26′ E. It is the only active volcano on the European mainland, although it is not currently erupting. ... Caserta, near Naples was certainly the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. ...


The Academy Award-winning actress Sophia Loren grew up in Pozzuoli. Sophia Loren (born September 20, 1934) is a motion picture and stage, Academy Award-winning actress, widely considered to be the most popular Italian actress. ... Pozzuoli is a city of the province of Napoli, in the Italian region of Campania. ...


The famous cinema producer Dino De Laurentiis (grandfather of Food Network star Giada De Laurentiis) was born in Torre Annunziata. Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ... Torre Annunziata, population 52,875 (1991), is a city in the province of Naples, region of Campania in Italy. ...


Recent campanian writers are Curzio Malaparte and Domenico Rea. Curzio Malaparte Curzio Malaparte (June 9, 1898 - July 19, 1957), born as Kurt Erich Suckert, was an Italian journalist, dramatist, short-story writer, novelist and diplomat. ...


Recent campanian actors and directors are Francesco Rosi, Iaia Forte, Pappi Corsicato, Teresa De Sio, Lello Arena, Award winning actor Massimo Troisi, Award winning director Gabriele Salvatores. Francesco Rosi (born November 15, 1922 in Naples) is an Italian film director. ... Massimo Troisi. ... Gabriele Salvatores (born July 30, 1950), is an Italian Academy Award-winning film director and screenwriter. ...


Recent and modern Italian songers and musicians from Campania are Peppino di Capri, Renato Carosone, Edoardo Bennato, Eugenio bennato Mario Merola, Sergio Bruni, Aurelio Fierro, Roberto Murolo, E.A. Mario, Eugenio Bennato Tony Tammaro, Teresa De Sio, Eduardo De Crescenzo, Alan Sorrenti, Jenni Sorrenti, Toni Esposito, Tullio De Piscopo, Gigi Finizio, Massimo Ranieri, Pino Daniele, James Senese and his group Napoli Centrale, Enzo Avitabile, Enzo Gragnaniello, Maria Nazionale, Nino D'Angelo, Gigi D'Alessio, the music groups of 99 Posse, Almamegretta, Bisca, 24 Grana la "Nuova Compagnia di Canto Popolare". remember all it is almost impossible. Peppino di Capri (born Giuseppe Faiella in Naples, Italy on July 27, 1939) is an Italian popular music singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Renato Carosone (Naples, 3 January 1920 - Rome, 20 May 2001) was among the greatest figures of Italian music scene in the second half of the 20th century. ... Edoardo Bennato (July 23, 1946) is an Italian singer-songwriter. ... Mario Merola (born 04/06/1934 - die 11/12/2006, Naples, Italy) was a Neapolitan singer and actor, most prominently known for having rejunevated the traditional popular Neapolitan melodrama known as the sceneggiata. ... Tony Tammaro, stage name of Vincenzo Sarnelli, (Naples, 1961) is a Neapolitan parody singer/songwriter. ... Alan Sorrenti (born December 9, 1950) is an Italian singer and composer. ... Tullio De Piscopo (born February 24, 1946) is an Italian drummer and singer. ... Massimo Ranieri (name in art of Giovanni Calone), Italian is a pop singer, a film and stage actor, and a show-business personality. ... Pino Daniele. ... Enzo Avitabile (born 1955 in Naples, Italy) is an Italian saxophonist. ... Nino Dangelo. ... Gigi dAlessio (born Luigi dAlessio) Italian popular singer and Neapolitan singer-songwriter. ... 99 Posse are an Italian hip-hop group from Naples. ... Almamegretta are a dub/world/reggae group from Naples, Italy. ...


Well known and deservers its place in the history of music it is the music genre called neapolitan song. Famous worldwide are O sole mio (a.k.a. "It's Now or Never"), Funniculì Funniculà, O Surdato nnamurato, Torna a Surriento, Guapparia, Santa Lucia Reginella, Marechiaro, Spingule Francese. Famous titles are hundreds. Neapolitan songs are thousands. Naples has played an important and vibrant role over the centuries not just in the music of Italy, but in the general history of western European musical traditions. ... O sole mio is a universally famous Italian romantic folk song. ... O Sole Mio is one of the best known Italian songs that exists, and because of that, very many singers have it on their repertoire. ... Santa Lucia is a well-known traditional Neapolitan song. ...


Even singers and music directors who do not have Campanian origins wrote Neapolitan songs Paolo Conte, Lucio Dalla, or adapted it to English, like Elvis Presley or Bryan Adams. There are some who perhaps just played neapolitan songs, such as for example Mia Martini or Domenico Modugno. Lyric artists Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Andrea Bocelli performed it various times. Paolo Conte in Berlin. ... Lucio Dalla on the cover of a collection of his best songs from 1970s and 1980s. ... Elvis redirects here. ... For other persons of the same name, see Brian Adams. ... Mia Martini (September 20, 1947 - May 12, 1995), pseudonym of Domenica Bertè, was a popular and critically acclaimed Italian singer. ... Domenico Modugno (January 9, 1928 - Lampedusa August 6, 1994) was a twice Grammy Award-winning Italian singer, songwriter, and later in life, a member of the Italian Parliament. ... Luciano Pavarotti performing on June 15, 2002 at a concert in the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI[1] (October 12, 1935 – September 6, 2007) was a celebrated Italian tenor in operatic music, who successfully crossed into popular music becoming one of the most... Plácido Domingo (born January 21, 1941) is a world-renowned opera singer, conductor, and general manager. ... Andrea Bocelli (born 22 September 1958) is an Italian singer. ...


There are also famous film artists who directed movies about Naples or actors who played famous movies in Campania, or even interpreted famous Neapolitans on-screen, including directors and actors Vittorio De Sica, Nanni Loi, Domenico Modugno, Renzo Arbore, Lina Wertmüller, Mario Lanza as "Caruso", Clark Gable in "It started in Naples", Jack Lemmon in the movies "Avanti!" and "Maccheroni" (a.k.a."Macaroni") played together with Marcello Mastroianni. Vittorio De Sica (July 7, 1902–November 13, 1974) was an Italian neorealist director and actor. ... Domenico Modugno (January 9, 1928 - Lampedusa August 6, 1994) was a twice Grammy Award-winning Italian singer, songwriter, and later in life, a member of the Italian Parliament. ... Renzo Arbore was born in Foggia (Italy), 24 june 1937. ... Lina Wertmüller (born Arcangela Felice Assunta Wertmüller von Elgg Spanol von Braueich on 14 August 1926) is an Italian film director of aristocratic Swiss descent. ... Mario Lanza as Giuseppe Verdis Otello. ... For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Avanti is a 1972 comedy directed by Billy Wilder, starring Jack Lemmon, Juliet Mills, Clive Revill, Edward Andrews and Gianfranco Barra. ... For other uses, see Macaroni (disambiguation) Penne, a very common kind of maccheroni in Italy. ... Penne, a very common kind of maccheroni in Italy. ... Marcello Mastroianni in 1958 Marcello Vincenzo Domenico Mastroianni (September 28, 1924 – December 19, 1996) was an Italian film actor. ...


Sports

Campania is very famous in Italy for its football teams, water polo, volleyball, and more recently for basketball and tennis.


The school of swords in Naples is the oldest in the country and the only in Italy in which a swordsman could acquire the title of "master of swords" and then teach the art of fence.


The sail clubs in Naples "Circolo Savoia" and "Cannottieri Napoli" are both very ancient in Italy and famous for thir regattas, and are also home for the main waterpolo teams.


Many sailsmen from Naples and Campania participate as crew to "America's Cup" sailing championship. This article is about the yachting competition. ...


In Castellammare di Stabia were born the Lorenzo Abbagnale and Carmine Abbagnale brothers four times rowing world champions and Olympic gold medallists. Location of Castellammare di Stabia in the Gulf of Naples. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


Main football teams

Società Sportiva Calcio Napoli, commonly referred to as simply Napoli or the abbreviation SSC Napoli, is an Italian professional football club based in Naples, Campania that was originally founded in 1904. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Unione Sportiva Avellino is an Italian football club, based in Avellino, Campania. ... Serie B is the name of the second highest football league in Italy. ... Old logo of Salernitana Sport Salernitana Calcio 1919 is an Italian football club based in Salerno, Campania. ... Serie C is the name of the third and fourth highest football leagues in Italy. ... Società Sportiva Juve Stabia is an Italian football club, based in Castellammare di Stabia, Campania. ... Location of Castellammare di Stabia in the Gulf of Naples. ... Serie C is the name of the third and fourth highest football leagues in Italy. ... S.S. Cavese 1919 is an Italian football club, based in Cava de Tirreni, Campania. ... Cava de Tirreni is a town and commune of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 10 kilometers NW by rail from the town of Salerno. ... Serie C is the name of the third and fourth highest football leagues in Italy. ... Benevento Calcio is an Italian football club, based in Benevento, Campania. ... Serie C is the name of the third and fourth highest football leagues in Italy. ... A.G. Nocerina 1910 is an Italian football club, based in Nocera Inferiore, Campania. ... Nocera Inferiore, formerly Nocera dei Pagani (anc. ... Serie D is the top level of Italian non-professional football and fifth level overall. ... Football Club Savoia 1908 is an Italian football club located in Torre Annunziata, Campania. ... Serie D is the top level of Italian non-professional football and fifth level overall. ...

References

  1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica:Campania
  2. ^ http://www.demo.istat.it/strasa2007/index.html

External links

Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Avellino (Italian: Provincia di Avellino) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Benevento (Italian: Provincia di Benevento) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Caserta (Italian: Provincia di Caserta) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... The province of Naples (Italian: Provincia di Napoli) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Salerno (Italian: Provincia di Salerno) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... “Abruzzi” redirects here. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Basilicata is a region in the south of Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Puglia (Apulia) to the east, Calabria to the south, it has one short coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea and another of the Gulf of Taranto in the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... For the place in the United States, see Sardinia, Ohio. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ...

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Campania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (603 words)
Campania is a region of Southern Italy, bordering on Lazio to the north-west, Molise to the north, Puglia to the north-east, Basilicata to the east, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west.
Campania was part of Magna Graecia, the Greek colonies of southern Italy; the first Greek colony was founded at Cumae, north of present day Naples, in the 8th century BC.
Campania was the breadbasket of Rome, until the acquisition of Egypt brought greater supplies of grain, resulting in the conversion of smallholdings in Campania to the characteristic latifundia that lasted from the Empire to modern times.
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