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Encyclopedia > Camenae
Topics in Roman mythology
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In Roman mythology, the Camenae were originally goddesses of springs, wells and fountains, or water nymphs of Venus . They were wise, and sometimes gave prophecies of the future. There were four Camenae: Carmenta, Egeria, Antevorta, and Postvorta. They were worshipped in the sacred forest known as Porta Capena near Rome. Carmentia or Carmentis was the chief among the nymphs, the spring and grove outside the Porta Capena was dedicated to her. On her festival day, the Carmentalia which fell on January the 11th and 15th Vestal Virgins drew water from that spring for the rites. Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... This page is about the Roman god Quirinus. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hêra (Greek or ) was the wife and sister of Zeus. ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (Greek equivalent Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind, as modern depictions of Justice are... Minerva was a Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom. ... This article treats Mercury in cult practice and in archaic Rome. ... Vulcan, in Roman mythology, is the son of Jupiter and Juno, and husband of Maia and Venus. ... Ceres, in Roman mythology, equivalent to the Greek Demeter (see which for more details), daughter of Saturn and Rhea, wife-sister of Jupiter, mother of Proserpina by Jupiter, sister of Juno, Vesta, Neptune and Pluto, and patron of Sicily. ... Venus is a Roman goddess principally associated with love, broadly, although not completely, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ... Lares (pl. ... For the son of Napoleon I of France, styled the King of Rome, see Napoleon II of France. ... Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... A flamen was a priest of the Roman religion. ... Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology and Etruscan mythology. ... In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (the good goddess) was a goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women. ... In Roman mythology, Carmenta was the goddess of childbirth and prophecy, associated with technological innovation as well as the protection of mothers and children, and a patron of midwives. ... In Roman mythology, Dea Dia is the goddess of growth. ... In Roman mythology, the god Convector oversaw the bringing in of the crops from the fields. ... In Roman mythology, Flora was a goddess of flowers and the season of spring. ... In Roman mythology, Lupercus was a name for Faunus as well as another god. ... In Roman mythology, Pales was the goddess of shepherds, flocks and livestock. ... In Roman mythology, Pomona was the goddess of fruit trees. ... In Roman mythology, the goddess Egeria (of the black poplar) was a goddess of childbirth, wisdom and prophecy and was one of the Camenae. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... In Roman mythology, Carmenta was the goddess of childbirth and prophecy, associated with technological innovation as well as the protection of mothers and children, and a patron of midwives. ... The name Egeria may refer to— in Roman mythology, the wife of Numa Pompilius, second king of Rome. ... Porta Capena is a place near Rome, formerly a sacred forest, where Numa Pompilius and Egeria met. ... The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. ...


They were later identified with the Greek Muses. For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Camenae - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (150 words)
In Roman mythology, the Camenae were originally goddesses of springs, wells and fountains, or water nymphs of Venus.
There were four Camenae: Carmenta, Egeria, Antevorta, and Postvorta.
They were worshipped in the sacred forest known as Porta Capena near Rome.
Encyclopedia: Camenae (802 words)
In Roman mythology, the goddess Egeria (of the fl poplar) was a goddess of childbirth, wisdom and prophecy and was one of the Camenae.
Camenae jewelry utilizes centuries-old techniques of hand-dying, painting and carving bone, hand-stamping and antiquing metals and applying 24K gold vermeil which gives her designs depth and texture.
Camenae is the name of the mythological Roman muses who cared for the Arts and Ancient Sciences.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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