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Encyclopedia > Camelot
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Camelot is the most famous fictional castle and court associated with the legendary King Arthur. Later romance depicts it as the fantastic capital of Arthur's realm, from which he fought many of the battles and quests that made up his life. Camelot as a place is associated with ideals like justice, bravery and truth, the virtues Arthur and his knights embody in the romances. It is absent from the early material, and its location, if it even existed, is in England. Most modern academic scholars regard it as being entirely fictional, its geography being perfect for romance writers; Arthurian scholar Norris J. Lacy commented that "Camelot can be anywhere."[1] Nevertheless arguments about the location of the "real Camelot" have occurred since the 15th century and continue to rage today in popular works and for tourism purposes. Camelot is the legendary stronghold of King Arthur. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (920x1210, 271 KB) Gustave Doré’s illustration of Lord Alfred Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”, 1868. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (920x1210, 271 KB) Gustave Doré’s illustration of Lord Alfred Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”, 1868. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early appearances

The castle is mentioned for the first time in Chrétien de Troyes' poem Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, dating to the 1170s, though it is not mentioned in all the manuscripts.[2] It is mentioned in passing, and is not described: Chrétien de Troyes was a French poet and trouvère who flourished in the late 12th century. ... Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart (French: Lancelot, le Chevalier de la Charrette) is an Old French poem by Chrétien de Troyes. ...

A un jor d'une Acenssion / Fu venuz de vers Carlion / Li rois Artus et tenu ot / Cort molt riche a Camaalot / Si riche com au jor estut. [3]
Upon a certain Ascension Day King Arthur had come from Caerleon, and had held a very magnificent court at Camelot as was fitting on such a day.[4]

Nothing in Chrétien's poem suggests the level of importance Camelot would have in later romances. For Chrétien, Arthur's chief court was in Caerleon in Wales; this was the king's primary base in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae and most subsequent literature. Chrétien pictured Arthur, like a typical medieval monarch, holding court at a number of cities and castles. It is not until the 13th century French prose romances, including the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle, that Camelot began to supersede Caerleon, and even then, many descriptive details applied to Camelot derive from Geoffrey's earlier grand depiction of the Welsh town.[1] Arthurian romances of this period produced in English or Welsh such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight did not follow this trend; Camelot was referred to infrequently and only in translations from French. In Britain Arthur's court continued to be located at Caerleon, or at Carlisle, which is usually identified with the "Carduel" of the French romances.[5] It was not until the late 15th century Thomas Malory created the image of Camelot most familiar to English speakers today in his Le Morte d'Arthur, a work based mostly on the French romances. He firmly identifies Camelot with Winchester, an identification that remained popular over the centuries, though it was rejected by Malory's own editor, William Caxton, who preferred a Welsh location.[6] , Caerleon (Welsh: ) is a suburban village and community, situated on the River Usk in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport (of which it is also a electoral ward) in south-east Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... Geoffrey of Monmouth (in Welsh: Gruffudd ap Arthur or Sieffre o Fynwy) (c. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: History of the Kings of Britain Geoffrey of Monmouths Historia Regum Britanniae (English: The History of the Kings of Britain) is a pseudohistorical account of British history, written around 1136. ... The Lancelot-Grail, also known as the prose Lancelot, the Vulgate Cycle, or the Pseudo-Map Cycle, is a major source of Arthurian legend. ... The Post-Vulgate Cycle is one of the major Old French prose cycles of Arthurian literature. ... The original Gawain manuscript, Cotton Nero A.x. ... For other uses, see Carlisle (disambiguation). ... Sir Thomas Malory (c. ... The Last Sleep of Arthur by Edward Burne-Jones Le Morte dArthur (spelled Le Morte Darthur in the first printing and also in some modern editions, Middle French for la mort dArthur, the death of Arthur) is Sir Thomas Malorys compilation of some French and English Arthurian... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... “Caxton” redirects here. ...


Etymology

The name's derivation is also unknown. Some have suggested it is similar enough to other Iron Age and Romano-British place names such as Camulodunum to suggest some historicity, while that particular locale was the first capital of Roman Britain and would have significance in Romano-British culture. Indeed Dr. John Morris (1913 - June 1977) the English historian who specialised in the study of the institutions of the Roman Empire and the history of Sub-Roman Britain, suggested in his book "The Age of Arthur" (1973) that as the descendents of Romanised Britons looked back to a golden age of peace and prosperity under Rome the name "Camelot" of Arturian legend was probably a reference to the capital of Britannia (Camulodunum) in Roman times. If historical the first part of it, Cam, could also reflect the Celtic word meaning "crooked" which is commonly used in place names as seen in Camlann. Given Chrétien's known tendency to create new stories and characters, being the first to mention the hero Lancelot and his love affair with Queen Guinevere for example, the name might also be entirely invented.[1] In Britain, the Iron Age lasted from about the 7th century BC until the Roman conquest and until the 5th century AD in non-Romanised parts. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... This article is about the town in England. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Romano-British culture is that of the Romanized Britons under the Roman Empire and later the Western Roman Empire, and of those exposed to Roman culture in the years after the Roman departure. ... John Morris could refer to: // John Morris (historian), English historian John Morris (composer), film composer often employed by Mel Brooks James Reeves (1909–1978), pseudonym of John Morris, British poet and writer John Morris (actor), actor most famous for voice roles in the Toy Story films Johnny Morris (1916–1999... For other uses, see Britannia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the town in England. ... Commanders King Arthur † Mordred † How Mordred was Slain by Arthur, and How by Him Arthur was Hurt to the Death, by Arthur Rackham “Camlann” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation) and Sir Lancelot (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guinevere (disambiguation). ...


Description in the romances

The romances depict the city of Camelot as standing along a river, downstream from Astolat. It is surrounded by plains and forests, and its magnificent cathedral, St. Stephen's, is the religious center for Arthur's Knights of the Round Table. There Arthur and Guinevere are married and there are the tombs of many kings and knights. In a mighty castle stands the Round Table; it is here that Galahad conquers the Siege Perilous, and where the knights see a vision of the Holy Grail and swear to find it. Jousts are held in a meadow outside the city. In some romances Camelot is eventually destroyed by King Mark of Cornwall after the loss of Arthur at the Camlann.[1] Astolat is a legendary city of Great Britain which is named in Arthurian legends. ... St. ... For the film, see Knights of the Round Table (film). ... King Arthur presides at the Round Table. ... For other uses, see Galahad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Siege Perilous (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... Mark of Cornwall (Latin Marcus Cunomorus, Cornish Margh, Welsh March or Cynfawr) was a king of Kernyw (Cornwall) in the early 6th century AD. He is most famous as the uncle of Tristan and husband of Iseult, who engage in a secret affair behind his back. ... Commanders King Arthur † Mordred † How Mordred was Slain by Arthur, and How by Him Arthur was Hurt to the Death, by Arthur Rackham “Camlann” redirects here. ...


The romancers' versions of Camelot drew on earlier descriptions of Arthur's fabulous court. From Geoffrey's grand description of Caerleon, Camelot gains its impressive architecture, its many churches and the chivalry and courtesy of its inhabitants.[1] Geoffrey's description in turn drew on an already established tradition in Welsh oral tradition of the grandeur of Arthur's court. The tale Culhwch and Olwen, associated with the Mabinogion and perhaps written in the 11th century, draws a dramatic picture of Arthur's hall and his many powerful warriors who go from there on great adventures, placing it in Celliwig, an uncertain locale in Cornwall. Although the court at Celliwig is the most prominent in remaining early Welsh manuscripts, the various versions of the Welsh Triads agree in giving Arthur multiple courts, one in each of the areas inhabited by the Brythons: Cornwall, Wales and in the Old North. This perhaps reflects the influence of widespread oral traditions common by 800 which are recorded in various place names and features such as Arthur's Seat indicating Arthur was a hero known and associated with many locations across Brythonic areas of Britain as well as Brittany. Even at this stage Arthur could not be tied to one location.[7] Many other places are listed as a location where Arthur holds court in the later romances, Carlisle and London perhaps being the most prominent. Culhwch and Olwen (Welsh: Culhwch ac Olwen) is a Welsh tale about a hero connected with Arthur and his warriors that survives in only two manuscripts: a complete version in the Red Book of Hergest, ca. ... The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... Celliwig or Kelliwic, is perhaps the earliest named location for the court of King Arthur. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... The Welsh Triads (Welsh, Trioedd Ynys Prydein) is used to describe any of the related Medieval collection of groupings of three that preserve a major portion of Welsh folklore and Welsh literature. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Yr Hen Ogledd or The Old North. Part of northern Britain before the Anglo-Gaelic conquest The Hen Ogledd, or Yr Hen Ogledd, is an Old Welsh term meaning The Old North which refers to the sub-Roman Brythonic kingdoms of what is now northern England and southern Scotland. ... Arthurs Seat most frequently refers to Arthurs Seat, Edinburgh, Scotland Other references to Arthurs Seat: Places named for King Arthur; most frequently to be found in England. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Identifications

The romancers' versions of Camelot draw on earlier traditions of Arthur's fabulous court. The Celliwig of Culhwch and Olwen appears in the Welsh Triads as well; interestingly, this early Welsh material places Wales' greatest leader outside its national boundaries. Geoffrey's description of Caerleon is probably based on his personal familiarity with the town and its impressive Roman ruins; it is less clear that Caerleon was associated with Arthur before Geoffrey. The later French romances make much of "Carduel", a northern city based on the real Carlisle. The Welsh Triads (Welsh, Trioedd Ynys Prydein) is used to describe any of the related Medieval collection of groupings of three that preserve a major portion of Welsh folklore and Welsh literature. ... , Caerleon (Welsh: ) is a suburban village and community, situated on the River Usk in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport (of which it is also a electoral ward) in south-east Wales. ... For other uses, see Carlisle (disambiguation). ...


Malory's identification of Camelot as Winchester was probably partially inspired by the latter city's history. It had been the capital of Wessex under Alfred the Great, and boasted the Winchester Round Table, an artifact constructed in the 13th century but widely believed to be the original by Malory's time. Malory's editor Caxton rejects the association, saying Camelot was in Wales and that its ruins could still be seen; this is a likely reference to the Roman ruins at Caerwent.[6] Malory associated other Arthurian locations with modern places, for instance locating Astolat at Guilford. For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... For other uses, see Round Table (disambiguation). ... Caerwent is a village in Monmouthshire, Wales. ... Astolat is a legendary city of Great Britain which is named in Arthurian legends. ... Guilford is the name of some places in the United States of America: Guilford, Connecticut Guilford, Indiana Guilford, Maine Guilford, Maryland Guilford, New York Guilford, Vermont Guilford County, North Carolina There is also: Guilford College (in North Carolina) Guilford Rail System This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which...


In 1542 John Leland reported the locals around Cadbury Castle in Somerset considered it to be the original Camelot. This theory is bolstered, or may have derived from, Cadbury's proximity to the River Cam and towns Queen Camel and West Camel, and remained popular enough to help inspire a large scale archaeological dig in the 20th century. Excavations by Leslie Alcock from 1966-70 were titled "Cadbury-Camelot", and won much media attention, even being mentioned in the film of the musical Camelot. The dig revealed by far the largest known fortification of the period, with Mediterranean artifacts (representing extensive trade) and Saxon artifacts. The use of the name Camelot and the support of Geoffrey Ashe helped ensure much publicity for the finds, but Alcock himself later grew embarrassed by the supposed Arthurian connection to the site, following the arguments of David Dumville, feeling it was too late and too uncertain and modern archaeologists follow him in rejecting the name calling it Cadbury Castle hill fort.[8] Cadbury remains widely associated with Camelot. John Leland (September 13, 1502–April 18, 1552) was an English antiquary. ... The hill from Corton ridge Cadbury Castle is a hill fort near the village of South Cadbury in Somerset, England, five miles north west of Yeovil at grid reference ST62862512. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Queen Camel is a village and civil parish in the South Somerset district of Somerset, England, about seven miles north of Yeovil. ... West Camel is a village in south Somerset, England, about seven miles north of the town of Yeovil. ... Leslie Alcock (born Manchester April 24, 1925, died June 6, 2006) was Professor of Archaeology at the University of Glasgow, and one of the leading archaeologists of Dark Age Britain. ... Camelot is the 1967 film version of the successful musical of the same name. ... Geoffrey Ashe is a writer of non-fiction books. ... Professor David Norman Dumville (b. ...


The fact there were two towns in Roman Britain named Camulodunum, Colchester in Essex, and Slack in Yorkshire, deriving from the Celtic god Camulos has led to the suggestion they originated the name. However, the Essex Camulodunum was located well within territory usually thought to have been conquered early in the 5th century by Saxons, so it is unlikely to have been the location of any "true" Camelot. The town was definitely known as Colchester as early as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 917.[9] Even Colchester Museum argues strongly regarding the historical Arthur: "it would be impossible and inconceivable to link him to the Colchester area, or to Essex more generally" pointing out that the connection between the name Camuloduum and Colchester was unknown till the eighteenth century. [10] Other places in Britain with names related to "Camel" have also been suggested, such as Camelford in Cornwall, located down the River Camel from where Geoffrey places Camlann, the scene of Arthur's final battle. The area's connections with Camelot and Camlann are merely speculative. This article is about the town in England. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Look up Slack in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slack has several meanings: The pursuit of Slack is a central belief of the Church of the SubGenius. ... For other uses, see Yorkshire (disambiguation). ... In Celtic mythology, Camulus or Camulos was a god of war. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... Camelford (Cornish: Ryskammel) is a town in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... The River Camel in north Cornwall rises below Hendraburnick Down and empties into the Bristol Channel at Padstow Bay. ... Commanders King Arthur † Mordred † How Mordred was Slain by Arthur, and How by Him Arthur was Hurt to the Death, by Arthur Rackham “Camlann” redirects here. ...


Later uses

In American contexts, the phrase "Camelot" refers to the presidency of John F. Kennedy, as his term was said to have potential and promise for the future, and the period was symbolic of hope for many in the world, who were inspired by Kennedy's speeches, vision and political policies. The period was ended by Kennedy's November 22, 1963 assassination, which is often compared to the fall of King Arthur. The lines "Don't let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot," from the musical Camelot, were quoted by his widow Jacqueline as being from his favorite song in the score. "There'll be great Presidents again," she added, "but there'll never be another Camelot again … it will never be that way again."[11] John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Kennedy Assassination redirects here. ... The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Jacqueline Bouvier redirects here. ...


The 1960 musical Camelot, by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, is based on T. H. White's literary version of the legend, The Once and Future King. White's novel consisted of five books (The Sword in the Stone, The Witch in the Wood, The Ill-Made Knight, The Candle in the Wind and The Book of Merlyn), and contains witty anachronisms, a plethora of medieval tidbits, and ultimately a tragic and elegiac tone. The Lerner and Loewe musical on the other hand is a sentimentalized snapshot of the love triangle of Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere. Boasting some rhythmic tunes and poignant lyrics, the musical proved a successful vehicle on stage for Julie Andrews, Richard Burton, and Robert Goulet. The film adaptation was released in 1967 and starred Richard Harris as Arthur; Harris later recreated the role on stage in a number of revivals. The 1960 Original Broadway cast recording album cover Camelot is a 1960 musical play by Alan Jay Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederic Loewe (music). ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Frederic Loewe, an Austrian-American composer (June 10, 1901 - February 14, 1988) worked with lyricist Alan J. Lerner in musical theater. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 – January 17, 1964) was an English writer, born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India. ... The Once and Future King is an Arthurian fantasy novel written by T.H. White. ... Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: The Sword in the Stone This article is about the novel. ... Sir Lancelot is the main protagonist of The Ill-Made Knight. ... The Book of Merlyn is an Arthurian fantasy book written by T. H. White. ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation) and Sir Lancelot (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guinevere (disambiguation). ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Robert Gerard Goulet (November 26, 1933 – October 30, 2007) was a Grammy- and Tony Award- winning Canadian entertainer. ... Camelot is the 1967 film version of the successful musical of the same name. ... For other persons named Richard Harris, see Richard Harris (disambiguation). ...


In the third series of Robin of Sherwood in the episode "The Inheritance" Robin is shown to be godson of a man called Agrivain. He and his daughter are the last of a family which has guarded 'Caerleon'(pronounced Kirleann) -their castle- and a round table for centuries. The castle is revealed to be Camelot and the table to be the Round Table of Arthurian legend. Robin of Sherwood, retitled Robin Hood in the US, was an acclaimed 1980s British television series, based on the legend of Robin Hood. ...


See also

The following is a list and assessment of sites and places associated with King Arthur and the Arthurian legend in general. ... The Matter of Britain is a name given collectively to the legends that concern the Celtic and legendary history of the British Isles, centering around King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Arthurian legend featured many characters, whose names often differed from version to version, and language to language. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... Sir Ector (sometimes Hector, Antor, or Ectorius) is the father of Sir Kay and the foster father of King Arthur in the Arthurian legend. ... For other uses, see Guinevere (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Merlin dictating his poems, as illustrated in a French book from the 13th century For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mordred (disambiguation). ... Morgan le Fay, by Anthony Frederick Sandys (1829 - 1904), 1864 (Birmingham Art Gallery): A spell-brewing Morgaine distinctly of Tennysons generation Morgan le Fay, alternatively known as Morgaine, Morgain, Morgana and other variants, is a powerful sorceress and sometime antagonist of King Arthur and Guinevere in the Arthurian legend. ... In Arthurian legend, Morgause or Morgase (also known as Anna-Morgause or Ann-Morgause) is the half-sister of King Arthur who slept with him and produced Mordred, the incestuous heir that would lead to Camelots downfall. ... Uther Pendragon (French: Uter Pendragon; Welsh: Wthyr Bendragon, Uthr Bendragon, Uthyr Pendraeg) is a legendary king of sub-Roman Britain and the father of King Arthur. ... For the film, see Knights of the Round Table (film). ... King Arthur presides at the Round Table. ... Sir Agravain or Sir Agravaine was a knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. ... How Sir Bedivere Cast the Sword Excalibur into the Water. ... In Arthurian Legend, Sir Bors was a Knight of the Round Table. ... Sir Calogrenant, sometimes known in English as Colgrevance, is a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. ... Gaheris is a figure of Arthurian legend, a knight of the Round Table, and a son of Morgause and King Lot of Orkney and Lothian. ... For other uses, see Galahad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gareth (disambiguation). ... Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Gawain (Gwalchmei, Gawan, Gauvain, Walewein etc. ... Geraint, with his wife Enid, from The Idylls of the King Geraint is a character from Welsh folklore and Arthurian legend, a king of Dumnonia and a valiant warrior. ... Sir Kay, son of Sir Ector, was one of the Knights of the Round Table and King Arthurs foster brother. ... Sir Lamorak was the son of King Pellinore and the brother of Sir Tor, Sir Aglovale, Sir Dornar, Sir Percival, and Dindrane. ... For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation) and Sir Lancelot (disambiguation). ... Palamedes, (also called Palamede, Palomides or some other variant) was a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. ... Percival or Perceval is one of King Arthurs legendary Knights of the Round Table. ... Sir Sagramore is a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. ... This article is about the Knight of the Round Table. ... Ywain rescues the lion Sir Ywain (also called Owain, Yvain, Ewain or Uwain) is a Knight of the Round Table and the son of King Urien in Arthurian legend. ... For other uses, see Excalibur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... King Arthur presides at the Round Table. ... The following is a list and assessment of sites and places associated with King Arthur and the Arthurian legend in general. ... For other uses, see Avalon (disambiguation). ... Corbenic (also Carbonek and Corbin) is the name of the castle of the Holy Grail in the Lancelot-Grail cycle and Thomas Malorys Le Morte dArthur. ... Remains of Tintagel Castle Tintagel (pronounced with the stress on the second syllable; Cornish: Dintagell) is a village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall, in England, UK. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. ... The Arthurian legend is one of the most popular literary subjects of all time, and has been adapted numerous times in every form of media. ... This is a list of books about King Arthur, or his related world, family, friends or enemies. ... Films based on the Arthurian legend are many and varied. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Camelot in Norris J. Lacy, Editor, The Arthurian Encyclopedia (1986 Peter Bedrick Books, New York) 75-6.
  2. ^ Camelot Project on Camelot
  3. ^ Lancelot Ou Le Chevalier De La Charette
  4. ^ Lancelot, vv. 31-32.
  5. ^ Mike Ashley, The Mammoth Book of King Arthur (London, 2005) 612-3
  6. ^ a b Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, p. xvii.
  7. ^ Topography in Norris J. Lacy, Editor, The Arthurian Encyclopaedia' (1986 Peter Bedrick Books, New York)
  8. ^ Alcock, L, Stenvenson, S. J. & Musson, C. R. 1995 Cadbury Castle, Somerset: The Early Medieval Archaeology. University of Wales Press.
  9. ^ Place Names
  10. ^ Official Response to linking Arthur and Colchester
  11. ^ Jacqueline Kennedy, interview with Theodore H. White, Life, Dec. 6, 1963. Coincidentally, the November 23, 1963 edition of the London Herald had the subheadline: “America Mourns Camelot Dream.”

Philippe Halsmans famous portrait of Marilyn Monroe Life generally refers to two American magazines: A humor and general interest magazine published from 1883 to 1936; A publication created by Time founder Henry Luce in 1936, with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. ...

References

  • Lacy, Norris J. (Ed.) (1986). The Arthurian Encyclopaedia. New York: Peter Bedrick Books.
  • Malory, Thomas (1994). Le Morte D'Arthur. New York: Modern Library. ISBN 0-679-60099-X

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Camelot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (411 words)
Camelot is the name of the stronghold of the legendary King Arthur, from which he fought many of the battles that made up his life.
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The phrase 'Camelot' is often used to refer to the period in US history of 1960-1963.
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Various stories present Camelot's court in varying ways, anything from welcoming followers of both the Celtic and the Christian gods, to exclusively one or the other.
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