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Encyclopedia > Camellia
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Camellia bush
Camellia japonica
Camellia japonica
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ericales
Family: Theaceae
Genus: Camellia
L.
Species

About 100–250 species, including:
Camellia assimilis
Camellia brevistyla
Camellia caudata
Camellia chekiangoleosa
Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia
Camellia connata
Camellia crapnelliana
Camellia cuspidata
Camellia euphlebia
Camellia euryoides
Camellia forrestii
Camellia fraterna
Camellia furfuracea
Camellia granthamiana
Camellia grijsii
Camellia hongkongensis - Hong Kong Camellia
Camellia irrawadiensis
Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia
Camellia kissii
Camellia lutchuensis
Camellia miyagii
Camellia nitidissima
Camellia nokoensis
Camellia oleifera
Camellia parviflora
Camellia pitardii
Camellia polyodonta
Camellia reticulata
Camellia rosiflora
Camellia rusticana – Snow Camellia
Camellia salicifolia
Camellia saluenensis
Camellia sasanqua – Christmas Camellia
Camellia semiserrata
Camellia sinensis – Tea
Camellia taliensis
Camellia transnokoensis
Camellia tsaii
Camellia vietnamensis
Camellia yunnanensis Image File history File links Camellia_japonica_natural. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families See text. ... Genera Apterosperma Camellia Dankia Franklinia Gordonia Laplacea Pyrenaria Schima Stuartia Tutcheria The Theaceae is a family of flowering plants, composed of shrubs and trees recognizable by their serrated, usually glossy leaves. ... Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Binomial name Camellia crapnelliana W. J. Tutcher Camellia crapnelliana (紅皮糙果茶 or 克氏茶) is a 5-7 metre tall small tree with thickly leathery leaves and solitary and terminal flowers. ... Binomial name Camellia granthamiana J. R. Sealy Camellia granthamiana (葛量洪茶), also Granthams Camellia, is a rare, endangered species of Camellia, which was first discovered in Hong Kong in 1955. ... Binomial name Camellia hongkongensis Seemann Camellia hongkongensis(香港茶, also Hong Kong Camellia) is a species of Camellia. ... Species About 100–250, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia honkongensis Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia kissii Camellia lutchuensis Camellia miyagii Camellia... Binomial name Camellia oleifera C. Abel Camellia oleifera,which is originated in China, is named for being an important source of edible oil obtained from its seeds[1]. It is widely distributed in China as it is cultivated extensively in China. ... Binomial name Camellia reticulata Lindl. ... Binomial name Camellia sasanqua Thunb. ... Binomial name Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze Camellia sinensis is one of the two major varieties or strains of the tea plant, the plant species whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea (The other being Camellia Assamica). ... Binomial name Camellia yunnanensis Cohen Stuart Camellia yunnanensis is a 1. ...

Camellia (Chinese: 茶花; pinyin: Cháhuā) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae, native to eastern and southern Asia from the Himalaya east to Japan and Indonesia. There are 100–250 existent species, with some controversy over the exact number. The genus was named by Linnaeus after Jesuit botanist Georg Joseph Kamel. Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), commonly called Pinyin, is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... Genera Apterosperma Camellia Dankia Franklinia Gordonia Laplacea Pyrenaria Schima Stuartia Tutcheria The Theaceae is a family of flowering plants, composed of shrubs and trees recognizable by their serrated, usually glossy leaves. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Georg Joseph Kamel (1661, Moravia-1706, Manila), also known as Camellus, was a Jesuit missionary and botanist to the Philippines. ...

Leaves of Camellia sinensis, also known as the tea plant
Leaves of Camellia sinensis, also known as the tea plant

They are evergreen shrubs and small trees 2–20 m tall. The leaves are alternately arranged, simple, thick, serrated, usually glossy, and 3–17 cm long. The flowers are large and conspicuous, 1–12 cm diameter, with (in natural conditions) 5–9 petals; colour varies from white to pink and red, and yellow in a few species. The fruit is a dry capsule, sometimes subdivided into up to 5 compartments, each compartment containing up to 8 seeds. Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 885 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 885 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze Camellia sinensis is the tea plant, the plant species whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea. ... A Silver Fir shoot showing three successive years of retained leaves In botany, an evergreen plant is a plant which retains its leaves year-round, with each leaf persisting for more than 12 months. ... A broom shrub in flower A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... “Foliage” redirects here. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


The genus is generally adapted to acidic soils, and does not grow well on chalk or other calcium-rich soils. Most species also have a high rainfall requirement and will not tolerate drought. Some Camellias have been known to grow without much rainfall. Acidity redirects here. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Soil comprising the pedosphere is positioned at the interface of the lithosphere and biosphere with the atmosphere and hydrosphere. ... The Needles,situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ... General Name, Symbol, Number calcium, Ca, 20 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 40. ... Rain is a source of precipitation which forms when separate drops of water fall to the Earths surface from clouds. ... A drought is a period of time when there is not enough water to support agricultural, urban, human, or environmental water needs. ...


Camellia species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species. See List of Lepidoptera which feed on Camellia. A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Superfamilies Butterflies Hesperioidea Papilionoidea Moths Acanthopteroctetoidea Alucitoidea Axioidea Bombycoidea Calliduloidea Choreutoidea Cossoidea Drepanoidea Epermenioidea Eriocranioidea Galacticoidea Gelechioidea Geometroidea Gracillarioidea Hedyloidea Hepialoidea Heterobathmioidea Hyblaeoidea Immoidea Incurvarioidea Lasiocampoidea Lophocoronoidea Micropterigoidea Mimallonoidea Mnesarchaeoidea Neopseustoidea Nepticuloidea Noctuoidea Palaephatoidea Pterophoroidea Pyraloidea Schreckensteinioidea Sesioidea Simaethistoidea Thyridoidea Tineoidea Tischerioidea Tortricoidea Urodoidea Whalleyanoidea Yponomeutoidea Zygaenoidea The order Lepidoptera... Camellia species are used as food plants by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species including: Coleophora case-bearers: (recorded on ) (recorded on ) Endoclita species (all recorded on ): Common Emerald Hemithea aestivaria (recorded on ) The Engrailed Ectropis crepuscularia (recorded on ) Turnip Moth Agrotis segetum Willow Beauty Peribatodes rhomboidaria (recorded...

Contents

Cultivation and uses

Camellia sinensis is of major commercial importance because tea is made from its leaves. Tea oil is a sweet seasoning and cooking oil made by pressing the seeds of Camellia sinensis or Camellia oleifera. Binomial name Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze Camellia sinensis is one of the two major varieties or strains of the tea plant, the plant species whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea (The other being Camellia Assamica). ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... Tea oil (also known as camellia oil) is an edible, pale amber-green essential oil with an herbal aroma and a somewhat sweet flavor. ... Binomial name Camellia oleifera C. Abel Camellia oleifera,which is originated in China, is named for being an important source of edible oil obtained from its seeds[1]. It is widely distributed in China as it is cultivated extensively in China. ...


Many other camellias are grown as ornamental plants for their flowers; about 3,000 cultivars and hybrids have been selected, many with double flowers. Camellia japonica (often simply called Camellia) is the most prominent species in cultivation, with over 2,000 named cultivars; next are C. reticulata, with over 400 named cultivars, and C. sasanqua, with over 300 named cultivars. Popular hybrids include C. × hiemalis (C. japonica × C. sasanqua) and C. × williamsii (C. japonica × C. salouenensis). They are highly valued in Japan and elsewhere for their very early flowering, often among the first flowers to appear in the late winter. Late frosts can damage the flowers. This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... // This article is about a biological term. ... Species About 100–250, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia honkongensis Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia kissii Camellia lutchuensis Camellia miyagii Camellia... Binomial name Camellia reticulata Lindl. ... Binomial name Camellia sasanqua Thunb. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ...


PF1022A, a metabolite of Mycelia sterile, a fungus that inhabits the leaves of Camellia japonica is chemically altered to synthesise emodepside, an anthelmintic drug. A metabolite is the product of metabolism. ... Divisions Chytridiomycota Zygomycota Glomeromycota Ascomycota Basidiomycota Deuteromycota The Fungi (singular fungus) are a kingdom of eukaryotic organisms. ... Emodepside is an anthelmintic drug that is effective against a number of gastrointestinal nematodes, is licensed for use in cats (1) and belongs to the class of drugs known as the octadepsipeptides (2), a relatively new class of anthelmintic (research into these compounds began in the early 1990s) (3), which... Anthelmintics (in the U.S., antihelminthics) are drugs that expel parasitic worms (helminthes) from the body or kill them. ... For other meanings, see Drug (disambiguation). ...


Camellias have a slow growth rate. Typically they will grow about 30 centimetres a year until mature although this varies depending on variety and location.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

As a favourite flower

Places

Camellia japonica is the state flower of Alabama as well as the city flower of the Chinese municipality Chongqing and of Matsue City in Shimane Prefecture, Japan. Species About 100–250, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia honkongensis Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia kissii Camellia lutchuensis Camellia miyagii Camellia... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: External links Juelies State Flower Garden of Gifs List of state flowers See also List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: &#x202a;Lists of flowers&#x202c; | &#x202a;United States state insignia&#x202c; ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Direct-controlled municipalities are the highest-level cities in China, with status equal to that of the provinces. ... Chongqing (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Chungching, also Chungking) is the largest and most populous of the Peoples Republic of Chinas four provincial-level municipalities, and the only one in the less densely populated western half of China. ... Matsue (&#26494;&#27743;&#24066; Matsue-shi) is the capital city of Shimane Prefecture in the Chugoku region of Japan. ... Shimane Prefecture (&#23798;&#26681;&#30476; Shimane-ken) is located in the Chugoku region on Honshu island, Japan. ...


People

  • Elizabeth, the Queen Mother grew Camellia in all of her gardens. As her body was taken from Royal Lodge, Windsor to lie in state at Westminster Hall of the Palace of Westminster, a Camellia from her gardens was placed on top of the flag-draped coffin.
  • Ralph Peer, the music industry pioneer often credited as the father of country music, was a president of the American Camellia Society.
  • Coco Chanel was very well known for wearing a white Camellia.

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the Queen Consort of George VI from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Royal Lodge was the residence of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in Windsor Great Park from 1952 until her death in 2002. ... Windsor (IPA: usually , but also ) is a suburban town and tourist destination in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead in Berkshire, England. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... Ralph Peer (May 22, 1892 - January 19, 1960) was born Ralph Sylvester Peer in Independence, Missouri. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gabrielle Bonheur Coco Chanel (August 19, 1883 – January 10, 1971)[1] was a pioneering French fashion designer whose modernist philosophy, menswear-inspired fashions, and pursuit of expensive simplicity made her arguably the most important figure in the history of 20th-century fashion. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Camellia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (351 words)
Camellia (Tsubaki in Japanese) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae, native to eastern and southern Asia from the Himalaya east to Japan and Indonesia.
Camellia is used as a food plant by the larvae of a number of Lepidoptera species including Common Emerald, The Engrailed, Turnip Moth and Willow Beauty as well as members of the genus Endoclita including E.
Camellia japonica is the state flower of Alabama as well as the city flower of the Chinese municipality Chongqing.
Camellia sinensis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (515 words)
Camellia sinensis is the tea plant, the plant species whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea.
Camellia sinensis is native to Southeast Asia, but is today cultivated across the world, in tropical and subtropical regions.
The seeds of Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera can be pressed to yield tea oil, a sweetish seasoning and cooking oil that should not be confused with tea tree oil, an essential oil that is used for medical and cosmetical purposes and originates from the leaves of a different plant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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