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Encyclopedia > Cambridge University
University of Cambridge
Cambridge University coat of arms
Latin: Cantabrigia (Cantab.)
Motto Hinc lucem et pocula sacra
Literal translation: "From here, light and sacred draughts". Non-literal: "From the university we receive enlightenment and precious knowledge".
Established 1209
Type of institution Public
Endowment
Staff
President
Rector
Chancellor HRH The Duke of Edinburgh
Vice-Chancellor Professor Alison Richard
Dean
Students 16,500 (total)
Undergraduate
Postgraduate 4,700
Doctoral
Location Cambridge, United Kingdom
Campus setting
University surroundings Historic landmark
Colours
Mascot
Affiliations Russell Group, Coimbra Group, EUA, LERU
Website http://www.cam.ac.uk

The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. It is widely considered one of the world's most elite universities. Download high resolution version (1181x1483, 116 KB)Cambridge University Shield - embossed. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Events Albigensian Crusade against Cathars (1209-1218) the Franciscans are founded. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment consists of funds or property donated to an institution or individual, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... A University Chancellor is the title frequently used — particularly in Europe — to indicate the head of a university. ... The Duke of Edinburgh The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark) (born 10 June 1921) is the husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor¹ Alison Fettes Richard (born in Kent, United Kingdom) is the current Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... A graduate school or grad school (American English), or, in British English a postgraduate school, is a school that awards advanced degrees, with the general requirement that students must have earned an undergraduate (bachelors) degree. ... Map of the Cambridgeshire area (1904) The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Mascots at the Mascot Olympics in Orlando, FL. A mascot is something, typically an animal or human character used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team (the name often corresponds with the mascot), society or corporation. ... The Russell Group of universities is a self-selected group of large research-led British universities; 18 of its 19 members are in the top 20 in terms of research funding. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... // History Because of the above definition, the oldest universities in the world were all European, as the awarding of academic degrees was not a custom of older institutions of learning in Asia and Africa. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Early records indicate that the university grew out of an association of scholars in the city of Cambridge, England, probably formed in 1209 by scholars escaping from Oxford after a fight with local townsmen. Map of the Cambridgeshire area (1904) The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Events Albigensian Crusade against Cathars (1209-1218) the Franciscans are founded. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline. ...


The universities of Oxford and Cambridge, jointly referred to as Oxbridge, have since had a long history of competing with each other, and are typically regarded as the most elite and prestigious universities in the United Kingdom, and two of the most prestigious in the world (see Oxbridge rivalry). Historically, they have produced a significant proportion of the world's prominent scientists, writers and politicians. Oxbridge is a portmanteau name for the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking universe. ... The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, collectively known as Oxbridge, are the two oldest and most famous universities in England. ... A scientist is a man who is an expert in at least one area of science and who uses the scientific method to do research. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ...


Affiliates of Cambridge University have won a total of 81 Nobel Prizes 1, more than any other university in the world 2. Of these, 70 had attended Cambridge as undergraduates or graduate students, rather than as research associates, fellows, or professors. (The University of Chicago has the second highest number of affiliated Nobel Prize winners — 78 or arguably 79 — but only 30 had been students there.) Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ... The University of Chicago is a private university primarily located in the Hyde Park neigborhood of Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1890, doors opened in 1892. ...


Cambridge University has produced some of the most influential scientists of the last few centuries: among those who have had a significant impact on human thinking are Newton (theory of gravitation), Darwin (theory of evolution), Harvey (circulation of the blood), Dirac (modern quantum mechanics), Thomson (discovery of the electron), Rutherford (nuclear structure of the atom), Maxwell (electromagnetic theory), Watson & Crick (the structure of DNA), Whittle (invention of the jet engine), and Turing (theory of computation). Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, inventor and natural philosopher who is regarded by many as the most influential scientist in history. ... In his lifetime Charles Darwin gained international fame as an influential scientist examining controversial topics. ... William Harvey (1578–1657) was a medical doctor who is credited with first correctly describing, in exact detail, the properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson, OM, FRS (August 30, 1871 - October 19, 1937), called father of nuclear physics, pioneered the orbital theory of the atom notably in his discovery of rutherford scattering off the nucleus with his gold foil experiment. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is one of the discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule. ... Professor Francis Harry Compton Crick, OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was a British physicist, molecular biologist and neuroscientist, most noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of NASA Glenn Research Center, USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the jet engine. ... Alan Turing is often considered the father of modern computer science. ...


The university has often topped league tables ranking British universities (for instance, it was ranked first on the Sunday Times league table in 2005, a position it has occupied for 8 years running), and recent international league tables produced by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University rated Cambridge third 3 and second 4 in the world respectively. The THES also ranked Cambridge first in science, second in biomedicine, third in the arts & humanities, sixth in technology, and eighth in social sciences. (Note that all university rankings are subject to controversy over their criteria; and that the THES and Jiao Tong tables are the only international rankings available). League Tables of British Universities, which rank the performances of universities in Great Britain on a number of criteria, have been published every year by The Times newspaper since the early 1990s. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University, (SJTU, 上海交通大學), abbreviated Jiao Da (交大),is one of the oldest and most influential universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The lunar farside as seen from Apollo 11 Natural science is the study of the physical, nonhuman aspects of the Earth and the universe around us. ... See also Medical doctor (BE), Physician (AE), and Medical school. ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of ice cream cones and fairy dances. ...


Cambridge also has arguably the greatest endowment of any European university. Approximate estimates in 2005 ranged from £2.7 billion to £3.1 billion[1]. This figure includes the colleges and affiliated university organizations - the share directly tied to the university itself exceeds £1 billion. (Estimates of Oxford's endowment (including its colleges) ranged from around £2.4bn to £2.9bn [2]in 2005; the Central European University in Budapest claims to have the next largest European university endowment at over €400 million in 2005). However, the university's income is largely reliant on funding by the UK government. In comparison to US universities, Cambridge's level of endowment is roughly equivalent to that of Columbia University. The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... Central European University is a university in Budapest, Hungary. ... Nickname: Pearl or Queen of the Danube Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ...


Cambridge is a member of the Russell Group, a network of large, research-led British universities, the Coimbra Group, an association of leading European universities, and the LERU, the League of European Research Universities. The Russell Group of universities is a self-selected group of large research-led British universities; 18 of its 19 members are in the top 20 in terms of research funding. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ...

Contents


General information

Left to Right: The Senate House, Gonville & Caius College and the University Church (Great St. Mary's) from King's Parade
Left to Right: The Senate House, Gonville & Caius College and the University Church (Great St. Mary's) from King's Parade

The thirty-one colleges of the university are technically institutions independent of the university itself and enjoy considerable autonomy. For example, colleges decide which students they are to admit, and appoint their own fellows (senior members). They are responsible for the domestic arrangements and welfare of students and for small group teaching, referred to at the university as supervisions. In Cambridge, "the university" often means the University as opposed to the Colleges. Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. ... A tutorial may simply refer to a list of instructions or tips for how to do any of a wide variety of tasks. ...


The current Chancellor of the university is HRH The Duke of Edinburgh. The current Vice-Chancellor is Professor Alison Richard. The office of Chancellor, who holds office for life, is mainly symbolic, while the Vice-Chancellor (as is usual at British universities) is the real executive chief. The University is governed entirely by its own members, with no outside representation in its governing bodies. Ultimate authority lies with the Regent House, of which all current Cambridge academic staff are members, but most business is carried out by the Council. The Senate consists of all holders of the M.A. degree or higher degrees. It elects the Chancellor; until their abolition in 1950, it elected Members to the House of Commons for Cambridge University, but otherwise has not had a major role since 1926. A University Chancellor is the title frequently used — particularly in Europe — to indicate the head of a university. ... The Duke of Edinburgh The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark) (born 10 June 1921) is the husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor¹ Alison Fettes Richard (born in Kent, United Kingdom) is the current Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. ... The Regent House is the name given to the governing body of the University of Cambridge. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ...


History

Roger of Wendover wrote that Cambridge University could trace its origins to a crime committed in 1209. Although not always a reliable source, the detail given in his contemporaneous writings lends them credence. Two Oxford scholars were convicted of the murder or manslaughter of a woman and were hanged by the town authorities with the assent of the King. In protest at the hanging, the University of Oxford went into voluntary suspension, and scholars migrated to a number of other locations, including the pre-existing school at Cambridge (Cambridge had been recorded as a "school" rather than University when John Grim held the office of Master there in 1201). These post-graduate researchers from Oxford started Cambridge's life as a University in 1209. Cambridge's status as a University is further confirmed by a decree in 1233 from Pope Gregory IX which awarded the ius non trahi extra (a form of legal protection) to the chancellor and universitas of scholars at Cambridge. After Cambridge was recognised by papal bull as a studium generale by Pope Nicholas IV in 1290, it became common for researchers from other European medieval universities to come and visit Cambridge to study or to give lecture courses. (Oxford did not receive the papal award of ius non trahi extra until 1254 and was never given papal recognition as a studium generale despite repeated requests). Roger of Wendover (d. ... Events Albigensian Crusade against Cathars (1209-1218) the Franciscans are founded. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... // Events The town of Riga was chartered as a city. ... Events Albigensian Crusade against Cathars (1209-1218) the Franciscans are founded. ... // Events Fortress of Kalan built. ... Gregory IX, né Ugolino di Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Studium Generale is the old name for a medieval university which was registered as an institution of international excellence by the Holy Roman Empire. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... The first European medieval universities were established in Italy and France in the late 12th and early 13th Century for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ...


Colleges were originally an incidental feature of the system: no college is as old as the university itself. They were endowed fellowships of scholars. There were also institutions without endowments, which were called Hostels at Cambridge but Halls at Oxford (which causes confusion since the terms College and Hall were used interchangeably in Cambridge).


The first college to be founded was Peterhouse, established in 1284 by Hugh Balsham, Bishop of Ely. Many of the colleges were founded during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, but colleges continued to be established throughout the centuries that followed, right up to modern times. The most recent college to be established is Robinson, which was built in the late 1970s. In 2004, there were newspaper reports that Cambridge was planning on expanding its student numbers by adding three new colleges, but this has been denied by the university. A full list of colleges is given below. Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peters College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 270 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Hugh de Balsham (d. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... There are other places also called Ely. ... Full name Robinson College Motto - Named after Sir David Robinson Previous names - Established 1977 Sister College St Catherines College Warden (Anthony) David Yates Location Grange Road Undergraduates 390 Graduates 96 Homepage Boatclub Robinson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In medieval times, colleges were founded so that their students would pray for the souls of the founders. For that reason, they were often associated with chapels or abbeys. However, in 1536, in conjunction with the dissolution of the monasteries, King Henry VIII ordered the university to disband its Faculty of Canon Law and to stop teaching "scholastic philosophy." This led to a change in the focus of the colleges' curricula — away from canon law and towards the classics, the Bible, and mathematics. Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1538 and 1541, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The Ancient Library American Philological Association LAnnée philologique Bibliotheca Augustana Classical associations worldwide at the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. ... The Bible (sometimes The Book, Good Book, Word of God, The Word, or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βιβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the classical name for the Hebrew Bible of Judaism or the combination of the Old Testament and New Testament of Christianity (The Bible actually refers to at least two... Mathematics is often defined as the study of topics such as quantity, structure, space, and change. ...

Clare College (left) and King's College Chapel (centre), seen from The Backs
Clare College (left) and King's College Chapel (centre), seen from The Backs

A Cambridge exam for the Bachelor of Arts degree, the main first degree at Cambridge in both arts and science subjects, is known as a Tripos. Although the university now offers courses in a large number of subjects, it had a particularly strong emphasis on mathematics from the time of Isaac Newton until the mid-19th century, and study of this subject was compulsory for graduation. Students awarded first-class honours after completing the maths course were named wranglers. The mathematics Tripos was competitive and helped produce some of the most famous names in British science, including James Clerk Maxwell, Lord Kelvin, and Lord Rayleigh. However, some famous students, such as G. H. Hardy, disliked the system, feeling that people were too interested in accumulating marks in exams and not interested in the subject itself. Despite diversifying its research and teaching interests, Cambridge today maintains its strength in mathematics. The Isaac Newton Institute, part of the university, is widely regarded as the UK's national research institute for maths and theoretical physics. Cambridge alumni have won eight Fields Medals and one Abel Prize for mathematics. Download high resolution version (1025x768, 217 KB)The west end of Kings College Chapel seen from The Backs. ... Download high resolution version (1025x768, 217 KB)The west end of Kings College Chapel seen from The Backs. ... Full name Clare College Motto - Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Acting Provost Dr Tess Adkins Location Kings Parade Undergraduates 397 Postgraduates 239 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, built... The Backs, or the Backs of the Colleges refers to an area of Cambridge at the rear of several colleges by the River Cam. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B., from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... TRIPOS is a computer operating system. ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, inventor and natural philosopher who is regarded by many as the most influential scientist in history. ... The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading scheme used to distinguish between the achievements of undergraduate degree holders (such as those gaining bachelors degrees or undergraduate masters degrees) in the United Kingdom. ... At the University of Cambridge in England, a wrangler is a student who has completed the third year (called Part II) of the mathematical tripos with first-class honours. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... The Right Honourable William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, GCVO, OM, PC, PRS (26 June 1824–17 December 1907) was a Scottish-Irish mathematical physicist and engineer, an outstanding leader in the physical sciences of the 19th century. ... Lord Rayleigh John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh (November 12, 1842 - June 30, 1919) was a British physicist who (with William Ramsay) discovered the element argon, an achievement that earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1904. ... G. H. Hardy Professor Godfrey Harold Hardy FRS (February 7, 1877 – December 1, 1947) was a prominent British mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis. ... Opened in 1992, the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is the United Kingdoms de facto national research institute for mathematics and theoretical physics. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to up to four mathematicians (not over forty years of age) at each International Congress of International Mathematical Union (therefore once every four years), since 1936 and regularly since 1950 at the initiative of the Canadian mathematician John Charles Fields. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ...


Originally, all students were male. The first colleges for women were Girton College in 1869 and Newnham College in 1872. The first women students were examined in 1882 but attempts to make women full members of the university did not succeed until 1947, 20 years later than at Oxford. It is sometimes stated that Cambridge did not give degrees to women until this date; although true this is misleading. From the nineteenth century women were allowed to study courses, sit examinations, and have the result recorded; this was treated by other institutions as a degree. In the twentieth century women could be given a "titular degree". The difference was that without a full degree women were excluded from the governing of the university. Hence it was a denial of the vote rather than of a qualification. Because it was necessary to belong to a residential college, and all the old colleges were for men only, the number of women students was severely limited by the smaller number of women's colleges until the 1960s, when the men's colleges began to go mixed. One women's college (Girton) went mixed, but the others took the view that until the gender ratio problem was completely solved they should not limit the number of women's places by admitting men. Full name Girton College Motto - Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College Somerville College Mistress Dame Marylin Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Graduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College lies on the extremity of Cambridge Girton College was established... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal The Lady ONeill of Bengarve Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage Boatclub A view of the Clough and Kennedy... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Of the current 31 colleges, 28 are mixed, while three admit women only (Lucy Cavendish, New Hall and Newnham). Two colleges admit graduate students only (Clare Hall and Darwin) and three colleges admit only graduate or mature undergraduate students (Wolfson, Lucy Cavendish and St Edmund's). Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name New Hall Motto - Named after - Previous names - Established 1954 Sister College St Annes College President Anne Lonsdale Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 377 Graduates 74 Homepage Boatclub New Hall is a womens college in the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal The Lady ONeill of Bengarve Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage Boatclub A view of the Clough and Kennedy... Full name Clare Hall Motto - Named after Clare College Previous names - Established 1966, 1984 Sister College St Cross College President Prof. ... Full name Darwin College Motto - Named after The Darwin Family Previous names - Established 1964 Sister College(s) Wolfson College Master Prof. ... Full name Wolfson College Motto Ring True Named after The Wolfson Foundation Previous names University College, Wolfson College (1972) Established 1965 Sister College Linacre College President Dr Gordon Johnson Location Barton Road Undergraduates 90 Graduates 510 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto - Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ...


Research and Teaching

The University has research departments and teaching faculties in most academic disciplines. Traditionally, Cambridge tends to have a slight bias towards more scientific subjects, but it also has a number of very strong humanities and social science faculties. Cambridge has a distinctive supervision system (with a teacher-student ratio varying between one-to-one and one-to-three) for the teaching of undergraduates (typically by academic staff, and often by graduate students in the larger subjects), very similar to the tutorial system at Oxford. All research and lectures are conducted by University Departments; the Colleges are in charge of giving, or at least arranging, the supervisions, as well as accommodation and most extra-curricula activities. Over the past decade there has been a building boom within Cambridge University, with a substantial number of new specialist research laboratories being built at several University sites around the city. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Science For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of ice cream cones and fairy dances. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


See also: Departments in the University of Cambridge


Admission

Undergraduate admission to Cambridge colleges used to depend on knowledge of Latin and Ancient Greek, subjects taught principally in the United Kingdom at fee-paying schools, called public schools. This tended to mean that students came predominantly from members of the British social elite. The admission process was changed and modernized in the 1960s. Aspiring students are now usually expected to be predicted at least 3 A-grade A-level qualifications relevant to the undergraduate course they are applying for. In addition to predicted grades, College Fellows also select candidates on unexamined factors such as potential for original thinking and creativity as expressed in extra-curricular activities and at interview - in a few cases, candidates may be offered an unconditional place. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Ancient Greek refers to the stage in the history of the Greek language corresponding to Classical Antiquity, which normally applies on two ancient periods of Greek history: Archaic and Classic Greece. ... An Independent school in the United Kingdom is a school that relies for all or most of its funding on non-governmental sources. ... An A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education usually taken during Further Education and after GCSEs. ...


In addition, in recent years admissions tutors in certain subjects have required applicants to sit the more difficult STEP papers in addition to achieving top grades in their A-levels or international Baccalaureate diplomas. For example Peterhouse College Cambridge requires 1 and 2 or better in STEP for as well as A grades at A-levels including A-level Mathematics and Further Mathematics in order to be considered for entry for the Mathematical Tripos. Between one-half and two-thirds of those who apply with the correct grades are given offers of a place in that case. However, there is still considerable public debate the United Kingdom over whether admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge are entirely meritocratic and fair, and whether enough students from state schools are encouraged to apply to Cambridge, and whether they succeed in gaining entry. Almost half of the successful applicants come from public schools, but the average qualifications for these successful applicants are higher than for successful applicants from state schools. The lack of state school applicants to Cambridge and Oxford has been considered to have a negative impact on Oxbridge's reputation for many years, and the University has put substantial amounts of effort and money into encouraging pupils from state schools to apply for Cambridge and thus help redress the balance. Other critics counter that excessive government pressure to increase state school admissions may be an inappropriate and damaging form of social engineering. Sixth Term Examination Papers in Mathematics, often referred to as STEP (or redundantly as STEP papers), are examinations set by the University of Cambridge in England to assess applicants for its undergraduate mathematics course. ... The International Baccalaureate (IB) is a group of three educational programmes and their respective examinations, as established by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). ... State school is an expression used in the United Kingdom and other countries apart from the United States to distinguish schools provided by the government from public schools which are in fact private institutions. ... For a similar concept in a different discipline see Social engineering (computer security). ...


Graduate admission is decided by the faculty or department relating to the applicant's subject — following this, admission to a college (probably but not necessarily the applicant's preferred choice) is guaranteed.


Sports and recreation

There is a long tradition at Cambridge of student participation in sports and recreational pursuits. Rowing is a particularly popular sport and there are competitions between colleges (notably the bumps races) and against Oxford (the Boat Race). There are also Varsity matches against Oxford in many other sports, including rugby, cricket, chess and tiddlywinks. Representing the university in certain sports entitles the athlete to apply for a Cambridge Blue at the discretion of a Blues Committee consisting of the captains of the thirteen most prestigious sports. There is also the self-described "unashamedly elite" Hawks Club, whose membership is usually restricted to Cambridge blues or half-blues. A coxless pair, sweep-oar rowing to the left of the photo; the bowside rower (or the starboard one, although the British term applied on this occasion) is further towards the bow of the boat. ... Corpus bumps Girton at the 2005 May Bumps in Cambridge A bumps race is a form of rowing race in which a number of boats chase each other in single file; each boat attempts to catch the boat in front without being caught by the boat behind. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... A varsity match refers to a sporting fixture between two university rivals. ... Argentina-France Rugby Union match Rugby football refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-05, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Tiddlywinks is a game played with sets of small, thin discs (called winks) lying on a hard surface. ... A Blue is earned by sportsmen at Cambridge University in one of thirteen designated sports (e. ... The Hawks Club is a members only club founded in 1872 by members of the University of Cambridge. ...


The Cambridge Union is a focus for politics and debating. There are also many drama societies, notably the Amateur Dramatic Club (ADC) and the comedy club Footlights. Student newspapers include the long-established Varsity and its younger rival, The Cambridge Student; broadcast journalism is represented by the student-run radio station, CUR1350. The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ... Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club, commonly referred to simply as the Footlights, is an amateur theatrical club in Cambridge, England, run by the students of Cambridge University. ... Varsity is the older of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (The Cambridge Student is the other, younger, one). ... The Cambridge Student (TCS) is the younger of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (Varsity being the other). ... CUR1350 (formerly known as Cambridge University Radio) is a student-run radio station at the University of Cambridge. ...


Myths and legends

The Mathematical Bridge over the river Cam (at Queens' College)
The Mathematical Bridge over the river Cam (at Queens' College)

There are a number of popular myths associated with Cambridge University and its history, some of which should be taken less seriously than others. Photograph of the Mathematical Bridge over the River Cam at the University of Cambridge, showing punters on the river. ... Photograph of the Mathematical Bridge over the River Cam at the University of Cambridge, showing punters on the river. ... The Mathematical Bridge The Mathematical Bridge is the popular but spurious name of a wooden bridge across the River Cam, and part of Queens College, Cambridge. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard, commonly called Queens College, in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Graduates 270 Homepage Boatclub...


One famous myth relates to Queens' College's so-called Mathematical Bridge (pictured right), which was supposedly constructed by Sir Isaac Newton to hold itself together without any bolts or screws. It was also supposedly taken apart by inquisitive students who were then unable to reassemble it without the use of bolts. The story is false, as the bridge was erected 22 years after Newton's death. It is thought that this myth arises from the fact that earlier versions of the bridge used iron pins and screws at the joints, whereas the current bridge uses nuts and bolts, which are more visible. Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard, commonly called Queens College, in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Graduates 270 Homepage Boatclub... The Mathematical Bridge The Mathematical Bridge is the popular but spurious name of a wooden bridge across the River Cam, and part of Queens College, Cambridge. ...


A true legend is that of the wooden spoon, which was the 'prize' awarded to the student with the lowest passing grade in the final examinations of the Mathematical Tripos. The last of many spoons was awarded in 1909 to Cuthbert Lempriere Holthouse, an oarsman of the Lady Margaret Boat Club of St John's College. It was over one metre in length, with an oar blade for a handle. From 1910, results were published alphabetically within class as opposed to score order, which made it harder to ascertain who the winner of the spoon was (unless there was only one person in the third class), and so reluctantly the practice was abandoned. A Wooden Spoon is a mock or real award, usually given to an individual or team which has come last in a competition, but sometimes also to runners-up. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College(s) Balliol College, Oxford Trinity College, Dublin Master Prof. ...


More recently, the legend of the Austin Seven delivery van which "went up in the world" is recounted in detail on the Caius College website. [3] Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge...


Miscellaneous

St Johns College New Court and Chapel seen from The Backs
St Johns College New Court and Chapel seen from The Backs

Building on its reputation for science and technology, Cambridge has a partnership with MIT in the United States, the Cambridge-MIT Institute. The university is also closely linked with many of the high-tech businesses in and around Cambridge, which form the area known as Silicon Fen. Cambridge businesses and the university have also been financially supported by several prominent figures in the technology world, including Gordon Moore of Intel Corporation and Bill Gates of Microsoft. In 2000, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation set up the Gates Scholarships to help students from outside the UK study at Cambridge. The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory is also housed in a building partly funded by Gates and named after him. St Johns College, Cambridge New Court (19th-century) Photo by Harry Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... St Johns College, Cambridge New Court (19th-century) Photo by Harry Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College Balliol College Master Prof. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a world leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... The Cambridge-MIT Institute, or CMI, is a partnership between the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Silicon Fen is the name given to the region around Cambridge, England, which is home to a large number of high-tech businesses. ... Gordon Moore This article is about the co-founder of Intel and coiner of what became Moores law. ... The following article is about the multinational corporation; intel is also an abbreviation for intelligence, used in reference to military intelligence and espionage. ... William Henry Bill Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is the co-founder, chairman, and chief software architect of Microsoft Corporation, the worlds largest computer software company. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKEx: 4338) is the worlds largest software company, with 2005 global annual sales of 40 billion US dollars and nearly 60,000 employees in more than 90 countries and regions. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is the worlds largest charitable foundation. ... The Gates Cambridge Scholarships were established by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2000, with a $210 million endowment. ... The William Gates Building, which currently houses the Computer Laboratory The Computer Laboratory (CL) at Cambridge is the University of Cambridges computer science department. ...


In the Meiji Era (1868-1912), several Japanese students studied at the university.[4]. In Japan, there is a Cambridge and Oxford Society[5], a rare example of the name Cambridge coming before Oxford when the two universities are referred to together — traditionally, the order used when referring to both universities is "Oxford and Cambridge", even though "C" precedes "O" in the Latin alphabet. The probable reason for this inversion is that the Cambridge Club was founded first in Japan, and it also had more members than its Oxford counterpart when they amalgamated in 1905. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Meiji period (Japanese: Meiji Jidai 明治時代 ) (1868–1912... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ...


Each Christmas Eve, BBC television and radio broadcasts The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols by the Choir of King's College Chapel, Cambridge - a national Christmas tradition which was first transmitted in 1928. The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, December 24, the day before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas festivities. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a format of Christian worship service celebrating the birth of Jesus and traditionally followed at Christmas. ... A choir or chorus is a musical ensemble of singers. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic architecture. ...


Colleges

View over Trinity College, Gonville and Caius, Trinity Hall and Clare College towards King's College Chapel, seen from St Johns College chapel. On the left, just in front of Kings College chapel, is the University Senate House
View over Trinity College, Gonville and Caius, Trinity Hall and Clare College towards King's College Chapel, seen from St Johns College chapel. On the left, just in front of Kings College chapel, is the University Senate House
Main articles: Colleges of the University of Cambridge, and [[]], and [[]], and [[]], and [[]]

The University of Cambridge currently has 31 colleges, of which three admit only women (New Hall, Newnham and Lucy Cavendish). The remaining 28 are mixed, Magdalene being the last all-male college to admit women in 1988. Two colleges admit only postgraduates (Clare Hall and Darwin), and four more admit mainly mature students or graduate students (Hughes Hall, Lucy Cavendish, St Edmund's and Wolfson). The other 25 colleges admit mainly undergraduate students, but also postgraduates following courses of study or research. Although various colleges are traditionally strong in a particular subject, for example Churchill has a bias towards the sciences, the colleges all admit students from just about the whole range of subjects, although some colleges do not take students for a handful of subjects such as architecture or history of art. Photograph of Cambridge colleges seen from St Johns College Chapel Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Photograph of Cambridge colleges seen from St Johns College Chapel Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Full name Clare College Motto - Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Acting Provost Dr Tess Adkins Location Kings Parade Undergraduates 397 Postgraduates 239 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, built... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College Balliol College Master Prof. ... The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... Full name New Hall Motto - Named after - Previous names - Established 1954 Sister College St Annes College President Anne Lonsdale Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 377 Graduates 74 Homepage Boatclub New Hall is a womens college in the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal The Lady ONeill of Bengarve Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage Boatclub A view of the Clough and Kennedy... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names - Established 1428 Sister College Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Graduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as a Benedictine hostel... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... Full name Clare Hall Motto - Named after Clare College Previous names - Established 1966, 1984 Sister College St Cross College President Prof. ... Full name Darwin College Motto - Named after The Darwin Family Previous names - Established 1964 Sister College(s) Wolfson College Master Prof. ... A mature student in tertiary education (at a university or a college) is normally classified as an (undergraduate) student who is over 21 at the start of their course. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Full name Hughes Hall Motto Disce ut Servus Named after Miss Elizabeth Phillips Hughes Previous names - Established 1885 Sister College(s) None President Prof. ... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto - Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ... Full name Wolfson College Motto Ring True Named after The Wolfson Foundation Previous names University College, Wolfson College (1972) Established 1965 Sister College Linacre College President Dr Gordon Johnson Location Barton Road Undergraduates 90 Graduates 510 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Full name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Previous names - Established 1966 Sister College Trinity College Master Sir John Boyd Location Storeys Way Undergraduates 440 Graduates 210 Homepage Boatclub Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Science For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Architecture (classical [[Greek ) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... History of art usually refers to the history of the visual arts. ...


There are several historical colleges which no longer exist, such as King's Hall (founded in 1317) and Michaelhouse which were combined together by King Henry VIII to make Trinity in 1546. Also, Gonville Hall was founded in 1348 and then re-founded in 1557 as Gonville & Caius. Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Michaelhouse is the name of one of the former colleges of the University of Cambridge, that existed between 1324 and 1546 before becoming part of Trinity College. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... Events April 7 - Charles University is founded in Prague. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge...


There are also several theological colleges in Cambridge, (for example Westminster College and Ridley Hall Theological College) that are loosely affiliated with the university through the Cambridge Theological Federation. Westminster College sits on one of the busier intersections of Cambridges ring road . Westminster College in Cambridge is a theological college of the Presbyterian Church in England, now the United Reformed Church. ... Ridley Hall is a theological college in Cambridge in the United Kingdom which trains intending ministers for the Church of England. ... The Cambridge Theological Federation is an association of theological colleges in Cambridge. ...


See also the list of Fictional Cambridge Colleges Fictional colleges are perennially popular in modern novels, allowing the author much greater license when describing the more intimate activities of a Cambridge college. ...


Cambridge University in literature & popular culture

Fiction

The James Bond 007 gun logo James Bond, also known as 007 (pronounced double-oh seven), is a fictional British spy created by writer Ian Fleming in 1953. ... William Will Bailey, White House Director of Communications, is a fictional character played by Joshua Malina on the television serial drama The West Wing. ... The West Wing is a popular and widely acclaimed American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin and produced and co-written by John Wells. ... The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... The Reeves Prologue and Tale is the third story to be told in Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Grantchester Grind is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, a British novelist born in 1923 who was educated at Lancing College and then at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Frederic Raphael was born in 1931. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Doctor Who 2005 television series logo. ... Douglas Noël Adams in an undated publicity photograph by Jill Furmanovsky. ... Douglas Noël Adams in an undated publicity photograph by Jill Furmanovsky. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 - January 17, 1964) was a writer. ... C. P. Snow, born Charles Percy Snow, (1905-1980) was a scientist and novelist. ... Sir Walter Besant (1836 - 1901) was a novelist and historian from London. ... Susan Elizabeth George (February 26, 1949) is the author of a number of thrillers set in England. ... Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 - July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. ... Jack Rosenthal, CBE (8 September 1931 - 29 May 2004) , was a playwright, who wrote several early episodes of the ITV soap opera Coronation Street and a number of successful plays and films. ... Maureen Lipman (born May 10, 1946) is a British actress. ... Tom Wilkinson Tom Wilkinson, OBE, born December 12, 1948, is an English actor. ... Alec Guinness as Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Sir Alec Guinness, KBE, CH (April 2, 1914 – August 5, 2000) was an Oscar winning English actor who became one of the most versatile and best-loved performers of his generation. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard, commonly called Queens College, in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell JCR President {{{JCR President}}} MCR President {{{MCR President}}} Location... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Data, played by Brent Spiner, is a character in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... The incumbent of the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics, the Lucasian Professor is the holder of a mathematical professorship at Cambridge University. ... Q is the seventeenth letter of the Latin alphabet. ... Civilization is a computer game created by Sid Meier for Microprose in 1991. ... Sid Meier is one of the most successful game programmers and game designers ever, with game series whose chronologies span 20 years. ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, inventor and natural philosopher who is regarded by many as the most influential scientist in history. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...

Non-fiction

  • A concise history of the University of Cambridge, by Elisabeth Leedham-Green, Cambridge University Press, 1996, ISBN 0521439787, ISBN 9780521439787
  • A history of the University of Cambridge, by Christopher N.L. Brooke, Cambridge University Press, 4 volumes, 1988-2004, ISBN 0521328829, ISBN 052135059X, ISBN 0521350603, ISBN 052134350X
  • Bedders, bulldogs and bedells: a Cambridge glossary, by Frank Stubbings, Cambridge 1995 ISBN 0521479789
  • Japanese Students at Cambridge University in the Meiji Era, 1868-1912: Pioneers for the Modernization of Japan [6], by Noboru Koyama, translated by Ian Ruxton [7], Lulu Press, September 2004, ISBN 1411612566. This book includes information about the wooden spoon and the university in the 19th century as well as the Japanese students.
  • Teaching and Learning in 19th century Cambridge, by J. Smith and C. Stray (ed.), Boydell Press, 2001 ISBN 0851157831
  • The Architectural History of the University of Cambridge and of the Colleges of Cambridge and Eton, Robert Willis, Edited by John Willis Clark, 1988. Three volume set, Cambridge University Press ISBN 0521358515
  • The Cambridge Apostles: A History of Cambridge University's Elite Intellectual Secret Society, by Richard Deacon, Cassell, 1985, ISBN 0947728139

Selected notable alumni

See also List of University of Cambridge people (extensive list) and Alumni of the University of Cambridge (college lists) The following persons attended the University of Cambridge but did not necessarily complete a degree course there. ...

Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Charles Babbage Charles Babbage (December 26, 1791 – October 18, 1871) was an English mathematician, analytical philosopher, mechanical engineer and (proto-) computer scientist who originated the idea of a programmable computer. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans (January 22, 1561 - April 9, 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, and essayist. ... Lord Byron, English poet George Gordon (Noel) Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788–April 19, 1824) was an English poet and leading figure in Romanticism. ... John Cleese as Q in Die Another Day. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English poet, 1795 Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and as one of the Lake Poets. ... Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... In his lifetime Charles Darwin gained international fame as an influential scientist examining controversial topics. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... This article deals with the Erasmus, the theologian. ... Dr. Germaine Greer Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian academic, writer, and broadcaster, who is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... William Harvey (1578–1657) was a medical doctor who is credited with first correctly describing, in exact detail, the properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ... Stephen Hawking in 2005 Professor Stephen William Hawking, D.Phil. ... Edward James Hughes, OM, referred to normally as Ted Hughes, (August 17, 1930 – October 28, 1998) was an English poet and childrens writer. ... Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal (November 9, 1877-April 21, 1938) was an important Indian Muslim poet from the colonial era, a philosopher and thinker of Kashmiri origin. ... The Right Honourable William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, GCVO, OM, PC, PRS (26 June 1824–17 December 1907) was a Scottish-Irish mathematical physicist and engineer, an outstanding leader in the physical sciences of the 19th century. ... John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes of Tilton (pronounced kānz / kAnze), ) (June 5, 1883 – April 21, 1946) was an English economist, whose ideas had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on American and British fiscal policies. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar, born into a Protestant family in Belfast, though mostly resident in England. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish mathematical physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... Sir Ian McKellen at the premiere of The Return of the King in Wellington, New Zealand, December 1, 2003 Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is a highly acclaimed English actor on both stage and screen. ... A.A. Milne. ... See John Milton (disambiguation) for other uses John Milton, English poet John Milton (December 9, 1608 – November 8, 1674) was an English poet, best-known for his epic poem Paradise Lost. ... Jawaharlal Nehru (जवाहरलाल नेहरू, Javāharlāl Nehrū) (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964), also called Pandit (Scholar, Teacher) Nehru, was one of the most important leaders of the Indian Independence Movement and the Indian National Congress, and became the first Prime Minister of India when India won its independence on August... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, inventor and natural philosopher who is regarded by many as the most influential scientist in history. ... A self-portrait circa 1951. ... Salman Rushdie (born Ahmed Salman Rushdie Arabic: أحمد سلمان رشدی on June 19, 1947, in Bombay, India) is an Indian-born British essayist and author of fiction, most of which is set on the Indian subcontinent. ... The Right Honourable Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was an influential British logician, philosopher, and mathematician, working mostly in the 20th century. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson, OM, FRS (August 30, 1871 - October 19, 1937), called father of nuclear physics, pioneered the orbital theory of the atom notably in his discovery of rutherford scattering off the nucleus with his gold foil experiment. ... Siegfried Sassoon, 1916 Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE MC (September 8, 1886 – September 1, 1967) was an English poet and author. ... Photo of Simon Schama by Robert Birnbaum Professor Simon Schama, MA (born February 1945) is University Professor in history and art history at Columbia University. ... Amartya Sen Amartya Kumar Sen (born November 3, 1933) is an Indian economist best known for his work on famine, human development theory, welfare economics, the underlying mechanisms of poverty, and political liberalism. ... Dr. Manmohan Singh (Punjabi: , Hindi: ) is the fourteenth, and current, Prime Minister of India. ... Sir Joseph John Thomson, OM , FRS (December 18, 1756 – August 30, 1940) often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... Thompson in the 1989 film The Tall Guy. ... Alan Turing is often considered the father of modern computer science. ... William Wilberforce William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 - 29 July 1833) was an English parliamentarian and leader of the campaign against the slave trade. ... Meaning is determined by use, in the context of a language-game {later} Meaning is determined by use, in the context of a language-game {later} Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 – April 29, 1951) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking works to modern philosophy... William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ...

University activities

History and traditions

This is a list of professorships at the University of Cambridge. ... This is a list of Chancellors of the University of Cambridge, from about 1246 to the present day: Hugh de Hotton, c. ... The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge is the main administrative and academic officer of the university, and is elected by the Regent House for a term of up to seven years. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... This snowman has been kitted out in a college scarf belonging to a member of Churchill College, Cambridge. ... The gown and hood worn for BA graduation As is natural in the second oldest university in the United Kingdom, the University of Cambridge has a long tradition of academic dress. ... St Johns College, Cambridge hall during a formal meal Churchill College, Cambridge dining hall prepared for a formal Formal Hall is the name given to a formal evening meal at any college in the universities of Oxford, Cambridge or Durham open to all members of the college and their guests. ...

Societies and leisure activities

Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Trinity College Great Court. ... Cambridge Student Liberal Democrats, the student branch of the Liberal Democrats for students at both Cambridge University and the APU University campus in Cambridge. ... The coat of arms for the Cambridge Union Society, which shares much in common with the coat of arms for the University of Cambridge. ... Overview Cambridge University Association Football League (CUAFL) is the governing body of football in the University of Cambridge. ... The Cambridge University Conservative Association (CUCA) is a long-established political society going back to the nineteenth century, founded as a Conservative branch for students at Cambridge University. ... The Cambridge University Labour Club (CULC) is an influential political society set up in the early twentieth century to unite socialist students at Cambridge University with the Labour Party. ... The Cambridge University Rugby Union Football Club, or CURUFC, is the rugby union club of Cambridge University, and plays Oxford University in the annual Varsity Match at Twickenham stadium every December. ... Cambridge University Cricket Club (now subsumed into the Cambridge University Centre of Cricketing Excellence) is a first-class cricket team. ... CUR1350 (formerly known as Cambridge University Radio) is a student-run radio station at the University of Cambridge. ... The Henry Jackson Society is a bi-partisan society based at Peterhouse, a college of the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. ... The bridge over the River Cam at Clare College during its 2005 May Ball. ... Punts on the Cam A punt is a flat-bottomed boat with a square-cut bow, designed for use in small rivers or other shallow water. ... The Pitt Club, founded in 1835, is an exclusive invitation-only club for male students at the University of Cambridge. ... Varsity is the older of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (The Cambridge Student is the other, younger, one). ... The Cambridge Student (TCS) is the younger of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (Varsity being the other). ...

Organisations and institutions associated with the university

Auto-ID Labs, previously known as the Auto-ID Center, is a federation of research universities working on an open standard for creating a seamless global network of physical objects. ... The Babraham Institute is an independent charitable life sciences Institute, sponsored by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. ... Cambridge Assessment (formerly known as UCLES) is one of the largest international assessment agencies recognised by governments around the world. ... The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate or UCLES Group is a department of the University of Cambridge in England. ... Cambridge University Library The squat 12-storey tower is used as storage and has no reader access Cambridge University Library is the centrally-administered library of the University of Cambridge in England. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Cambridge University Students Union (CUSU) is the university-wide representative body for students at the University of Cambridge, UK. Established in 1971 as the new Cambridge Students Union (CSU), it was eventually recognised by the university authorities on May 25th, 1984 and renamed, following a student referendum in March 1985... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The main entrance to the Fitzwilliam Museum, facing Trumpington Sreet. ... The Franco-British Student Alliance (FBSA, or Alliance Etudiante Franco-Britannique, AEFB, in French), is a forum and networking organization for students from France and Britain which both addresses the future of Franco-British relations and promotes the global competitiveness of the academic sectors of both countries. ... Granta 37, published September 1991 Granta is a literary magazine which publishes new writing — fiction, personal history, reportage and investigative journalism — four times a year. ... Opened in 1992, the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is the United Kingdoms de facto national research institute for mathematics and theoretical physics. ... The three cottages which comprise the main house of Kettles Yard. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The Millennium Mathematics Project (MMP) was set up within the University of Cambridge in 1999 as a joint project between the Faculties of Mathematics and Education. ... Phoenix was the name of an IBM mainframe computer at Cambridge Universitys Computer Laboratory. ... The Russell Group of universities is a self-selected group of large research-led British universities; 18 of its 19 members are in the top 20 in terms of research funding. ... The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (formally the Sanger Centre) is a genome research centre in Cambridgeshire, England. ... The Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI) is centre for research into both polar regions. ... The Sidgwick Site is one of the biggest sites within the University of Cambridge. ... West Cambridge refers to a university site to the west of Cambridge city centre in England. ... The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to strike the hour. ...

References

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of Chicago is a private university primarily located in the Hyde Park neigborhood of Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1890, doors opened in 1892. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a world leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University, (SJTU, 上海交通大學), abbreviated Jiao Da (交大),is one of the oldest and most influential universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...

External links

  • University of Cambridge official website
  • A Short History of the University – from the official website
  • talks.cam.ac.uk – Cambridge University talks-listing service
  • Varsity – a student newspaper
  • The Cambridge Student (TCS) – a student newspaper
  • Cambridge Alumni Magazine
  • Gown – the graduate magazine
  • North-West Cambridge expansion plan
  • Tompkins Table - unofficial ranking of Cambridge colleges
  • CUR1350 – the student-run radio station
  • Cambridge University jargon
  • Cambridge Online – a comprehensive city guide and directory with thousands of pages of local information contributed by Cambridge residents
  • Computing-Info - Information for prospective students about computing and networking policies at the University and within the colleges
  • Images and maps
    • Aerial view – from Google Maps
    • Interactive map – a well designed zoomable map linking to all the University departments and colleges
    • Cambridge in Colour – Cambridge University photography
    • Cambridge 2000 – a large collection of photographs of Cambridge architecture
Colleges of the University of Cambridge Arms of the University

Christ's | Churchill | Clare | Clare Hall | Corpus Christi | Darwin | Downing | Emmanuel | Fitzwilliam | Girton | Gonville and Caius | Homerton | Hughes Hall | Jesus | King's | Lucy Cavendish | Magdalene | New Hall | Newnham | Pembroke | Peterhouse | Queens' | Robinson | St Catharine's | St Edmund's | St John's | Selwyn | Sidney Sussex | Trinity | Trinity Hall | Wolfson Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Screenshot of Google Maps showing a route from Toronto to Ottawa Penang island and Province Wellesley on the mainland as seen on Google Maps [1] Google Maps is the conventional name of a free, web map server application and technology provided by Google at http://maps. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (800x982, 127 KB)made by me in Inkscape. ... Full name Christs College Motto Souvent me Souvient I Often Remember Named after Christ Previous names Gods-house (1437), Christs College (1505) Established 1505 Sister College Wadham College Master Prof. ... Full name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Previous names - Established 1966 Sister College Trinity College Master Sir John Boyd Location Storeys Way Undergraduates 440 Graduates 210 Homepage Boatclub Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge... Full name Clare College Motto - Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ... Full name Clare Hall Motto - Named after Clare College Previous names - Established 1966, 1984 Sister College St Cross College President Prof. ... Full name The College of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary in Cambridge Motto There is a toast, Floreat antiqua domus (May the old house flourish), from which the colleges nickname, Old House, is derived Named after The citys Guilds of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin... Full name Darwin College Motto - Named after The Darwin Family Previous names - Established 1964 Sister College(s) Wolfson College Master Prof. ... Full name Downing College Motto Quaerere Verum Seek the truth Named after Sir George Downing Previous names - Established 1800 Sister College Lincoln College Master Prof. ... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College(s) Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location Regent Street Undergraduates 494 Postgraduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge... Full name Fitzwilliam College Motto Ex antiquis et novissimis optima Best of the old - and of the latest Named after Fitzwilliam Museum, named after Richard Fitzwilliam Previous names Fitzwilliam Hall [Non collegiate] (1869), Fitzwilliam House [Non collegiate] (1924) Established 1966 Sister College(s) St Edmund Hall Master Prof. ... Full name Girton College Motto Super Girton - No one likes us, we dont care Better is wisdom than weapons of war (Alumni) Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College(s) Somerville College Mistress Professor Dame Marilyn Strathern Location... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick (Lent 2006: Sir Christopher Hum) Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge... Full name Motto Respice Finem Look to the end Named after Homerton town Previous names See article Established 1976 Sister College None Principal Dr Kate Pretty Location Hills Road Undergraduates 550 Graduates 500 Homepage Boatclub The Cavendish Building at Homertons present site Homerton College is one of the constituent... Full name Hughes Hall Motto Disce ut Servus Named after Miss Elizabeth Phillips Hughes Previous names - Established 1885 Sister College(s) None President Prof. ... Full name The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge Motto Facias Prosperum Ter Named after Jesus Lane & Jesus Parish Previous names - Established 1496 Sister College(s) Jesus College Master Prof. ... Full name The Kings College of Our Lady and St Nicholas Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Acting Provost Dr Tess Adkins Location Kings Parade Undergraduates 397 Postgraduates 239 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, built... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names - Established 1428 Sister College Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Graduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as a Benedictine hostel... Full name New Hall Motto - Named after - Previous names - Established 1954 Sister College St Annes College President Anne Lonsdale Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 377 Graduates 74 Homepage Boatclub New Hall is a womens college in the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal The Lady ONeill of Bengarve Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage Boatclub A view of the Clough and Kennedy... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College(s) Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Pembroke Street Undergraduates ~420 Postgraduates 194 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peters College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 270 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard, commonly called Queens College, in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Graduates 270 Homepage Boatclub... Full name Robinson College Motto - Named after Sir David Robinson Previous names - Established 1977 Sister College St Catherines College Warden (Anthony) David Yates Location Grange Road Undergraduates 390 Graduates 96 Homepage Boatclub Robinson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge. ... Full name Collegium sive aula D. Catharinæ in Universitate Cantabrigiensi Motto   Do it for the wheel! (unofficial) Named after St Catharine of Alexandria Previous names Katharine Hall (1473-1860) Established 1473 Sister College(s) Worcester College Master Prof. ... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto - Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ... Full name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto - Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist, Cambridge, named after John the Evangelist Previous names - Established 1511 Sister College(s) Balliol College, Oxford Trinity College, Dublin Master Prof. ... Full name Selwyn College Motto ΑΝΔΡΙΖΕΣΘΕ quit ye like men Named after George Augustus Selwyn Previous names - Established 1882 Sister College Keble College Master Prof. ... Full name Sidney Sussex College Motto Dieu me garde de calomnie God preserve me from calumny Named after Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex Previous names - Established 1596 Sister College(s) St Johns College Master Prof. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Full name Wolfson College Motto Ring True Named after The Wolfson Foundation Previous names University College, Wolfson College (1972) Established 1965 Sister College Linacre College President Dr Gordon Johnson Location Barton Road Undergraduates 90 Graduates 510 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of...

Coimbra Group
(of European research universities)
Coimbra Group
Aarhus | Barcelona | Bergen | Bologna | Bristol | Budapest | Cambridge | Coimbra | Dublin | Edinburgh | Galway | Geneva | Göttingen | Granada | Graz | Groningen | Heidelberg | Jena | Kraków | Leiden | Leuven | Louvain-la-Neuve | Lyon | Montpellier | Oxford | Padua | Pavia | Poitiers | Prague | Salamanca | Siena | Tartu | Thessaloniki | Turku I | Turku II | Uppsala | Würzburg
League of European Research Universities

Cambridge | Edinburgh | Geneva | Heidelberg | Helsinki | Karolinska (Stockholm) | Leiden | Leuven | Milan | Munich | Oxford | Strasbourg I (Louis Pasteur) Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... World map showing Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... logo of the Coimbra Group. ... University of Aarhus The University of Aarhus is a university based in Ã…rhus, Denmark. ... The University of Barcelona (Catalan: Universitat de Barcelona, UB) is a public university located in the city of Barcelona, Spain. ... The University of Bergen (Universitetet i Bergen) is located in Bergen, Norway. ... The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is the university of Bologna, in Italy. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about Eötvös Loránd University, which is often referred to as University of Budapest. ... The University of Coimbra (Portuguese: Universidade de Coimbra) is a Portuguese public university in Coimbra, Portugal. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, and is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish: Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) and is located in Galway, Ireland. ... The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is one of the oldest universities in the world. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... The University of Granada is a university at Granada, Spain, founded in 1531 by the Emperor Carlos V, with support of Pope Clemente VII. Categories: University stubs | Universities and colleges in Spain ... The University of Graz (founded 1585), a university located in Graz, Austria, is the second-largest university in Austria. ... Front of the main building of the University of Groningen The University of Groningen (Dutch: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen or RuG) is a university in Groningen, Netherlands. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (FSU) is located in Jena, Thuringia in Germany and was named for the German writer Friedrich Schiller in 1934. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet JagielloÅ„ski, often shortened to UJ) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ... The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (or K.U.Leuven, or in English Catholic University of Leuven - also the translated name of its French-speaking sister university) - is a Flemish university, located in the town of Leuven in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking (northern) region of Belgium. ... The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known as UCL, is Belgiums largest French-speaking university. ... The University of Lyon is a university in Lyon, France Categories: Substubs ... The University of Montpellier, (Université de Montpellier), is a French university in Montpellier. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is one of the most well-renowned universities in Italy. ... The University of Pavia is a university in Pavia, Italy. ... University of Poitiers is a university located in Poitiers, France, founded in 1431 by Pope Eugenius IV and chartered by King Charles VII of France. ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest, largest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... The University of Salamanca (Spanish Universidad de Salamanca), located in the town of Salamanca, west-northwest of Madrid, is the oldest university in Spain, and one of the oldest in Europe. ... The University of Siena (Università di Siena, UNISI) in Tuscany is one of the older universities of Italy, founded in the 13th century, initially as a Studium. ... The University of Tartu (Estonian: Tartu Ülikool, German: Universität Dorpat) is the national university of Estonia, and the one classical university in Estonia, located in the city of Tartu. ... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ... The University of Turku, located in Turku in southwestern Finland, is the second largest university in the country as measured by student enrolment. ... The Ã…bo Akademi University is a Swedish language university, founded in 1918 in Turku (Ã…bo in Swedish), Finland. ... Uppsala University (Swedish Uppsala universitet) is a public university in Uppsala, Sweden. ... The University of Würzburg is a university in Würzburg, Germany, founded in 1402. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is one of the oldest universities in the world. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... The University of Helsinki is a university located in Helsinki, Finland. ... The Karolinska Institute or Karolinska institutet is a medical university in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ... The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (or K.U.Leuven, or in English Catholic University of Leuven - also the translated name of its French-speaking sister university) - is a Flemish university, located in the town of Leuven in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking (northern) region of Belgium. ... The University of Milan (Università degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI) is one the larger universities in Italy, with about 60,000 students, a teaching and research staff of 2,500 and a non-teaching staff of 2,000. ... Main building of the Ludwig Maximilians University The Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is with approximately 48,000 students the second largest university in Germany (surpassed only by the University of Cologne) and generally considered one of the best universities of... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The Université Louis Pasteur, also known as Strasbourg I or ULP is a large university in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cambridge University Press (63 words)
Cambridge University Press publishes the finest academic and educational writing from around the world.
As a department of the University of Cambridge, its purpose is to further the University's objective of advancing knowledge, education, learning, and research.
Cambridge is not just a leading British publisher, it is the oldest printer and publisher in the world and one of the largest academic publishers globally.
University of Cambridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4216 words)
Cambridge is a member of the Russell Group, a network of large, research-led British universities; the Coimbra Group, an association of leading European universities; the LERU (League of European Research Universities), and the IARU (International Alliance of Research Universities).
Cambridge is a collegiate university, with its main functions divided between the central departments of the university and a number of colleges.
Cambridge’s status as a University is further confirmed by a decree in 1233 from Pope Gregory IX which awarded the ius non trahi extra (a form of legal protection) to the chancellor and universitas of scholars at Cambridge.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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