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Encyclopedia > Cambridge
Cambridge
King's College Chapel, seen from The Backs

Kings College Chapel, seen from The Backs. Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Cambridge is a city in England. ... Cambridge, Gloucestershire Cambridge is a village in the district of Stroud, in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Download high resolution version (1025x768, 217 KB)The west end of Kings College Chapel seen from The Backs. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ... The Backs, or the Backs of the Colleges refers to an area of Cambridge at the rear of several colleges by the River Cam. ...

City of Cambridge

Shown within Cambridgeshire
Geography
Status City (1951)
Region East of England
Admin. county Cambridgeshire
Area
- Total
Ranked 316th
40.70 km²
Admin. HQ Cambridge
ONS code 12UB
Coordinates 52°12′29″N, 0°7′21″E
Demographics
Population
- Total
- Density
Ranked 157th
124,000 (2005 est.)
3,047 / km²
Ethnicity 89.4% White British
4.4% Mixed Race/Other
3.8% British Asian
1.3% Afro-Carib.
2.1% Chinese
Politics
Arms of Cambridge City Council
Cambridge City Council
http://www.cambridge.gov.uk/
Leadership Leader & Cabinet
Executive Liberal Democrat
MPs David Howarth (Lib Dem, Cambridge)
Andrew Lansley (Con, Cambs Sth)
Trinity Street, St John's Street and the Main Gate of St John's College with the tower of the college's chapel looming in the background
Trinity Street, St John's Street and the Main Gate of St John's College with the tower of the college's chapel looming in the background

The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. It lies approximately 50 miles (80 km) north-northeast of London and is surrounded by a number of smaller towns and villages. It is also at the heart of the high-technology centre known as Silicon Fen. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... district of Cambridgeshire File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... White British is an ethnic classification used in the United Kingdom Census 2001, 92. ... The terms multiracial, biracial and mixed-race describe people whose ancestors are not of a single race. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... See also: British African-Caribbean community, Caribbean British, British Asian,Britsh Mixed Black British is term which has had different meanings and uses as a racial and political label. ... Arms of Cambridge City Council. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... David Howarth David Ross Howarth (born November 10, 1958) is a British Liberal Democrat politician and Member of Parliament for Cambridge. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Cambridge is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Andrew Lansley Andrew David Lansley CBE MP (born 11 December 1956) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Cambridgeshire South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Download high resolution version (768x1126, 308 KB)St Johns College, Cambridge old gatehouse with the chapel tower behind it. ... Download high resolution version (768x1126, 308 KB)St Johns College, Cambridge old gatehouse with the chapel tower behind it. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... There is also a College Town next to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in Berkshire, England. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... High tech refers to technology that is at the cutting-edge—the most advanced technology currently available. ... Silicon Fen (sometimes the Cambridge Cluster) is the name given to the region around Cambridge, England, which is home to a large cluster of high-tech businesses, especially those related to software, electronics, and biotechnology. ...


Cambridge is best known for the University of Cambridge, which includes the renowned Cavendish Laboratory, King's College Chapel, and the Cambridge University Library. The Cambridge skyline is dominated by the last two, along with the chimney of Addenbrooke's Hospital in the far south of the city and St John's College Chapel tower in the north. The city's name is pronounced /'keɪm.bɹɪdʒ/, as opposed to another Cambridge in Gloucestershire, England, which is pronounced /'kæm.bɹɪdʒ/. The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Plaque, at old site Entrance, old site, Free School Lane The Cavendish Laboratory is the University of Cambridges Department of Physics, and is part of the universitys School of Physical Sciences. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ... Cambridge University Library The Cambridge University Library is the centrally-administered library of the University of Cambridge in England. ... Addenbrookes Hospital is a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, England, with strong links to the University of Cambridge. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Cambridge, Gloucestershire Cambridge is a village in the district of Stroud, in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ...


According to the 2001 census, the City's population was 108,863 (including 22,153 students). However, the population of the urban area, which includes parts of South Cambridgeshire district is estimated to be 130,000. South Cambridgeshire is a mostly rural district of Cambridgeshire, England. ...

Contents

History

Prehistory

Settlements have existed around the area since before the Roman Empire. The earliest clear evidence of occupation, a collection of hunting weapons, is from the Late Bronze Age, starting around 1000 BC. There is further archaeological evidence through the Iron Age, a Belgic tribe having settled on Castle Hill in the 1st century BC. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The first recorded mention of Belgae, part of the mix that make up modern Belgians, was in the year 58 B.C.; Gaius Julius Caesar, departing from the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (now Provence), decided to conquer the rest of the Gauls. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ...


Roman times

Main article: Duroliponte

The first major development of the area began with the Roman invasion of Britain in about AD 40. Castle Hill made Cambridge a useful place for a military outpost from which to defend the River Cam. It was also the crossing point for the Via Devana which linked Colchester in Essex with the garrisons at Lincoln and the north. This Roman settlement has been identified as Duroliponte. Duroliponte was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. ... Roman invasion of Britain: Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... Events Roman Empire Caligula embarks on a campaign to conquer Britain, and fails miserably. ... View north from Kings College bridge The River Cam is a tributary of the River Great Ouse in the east of England. ... The Via Devana was a Roman Road in England that ran from Colchester in the south-east to Chester in the north-west. ... This article is about the town in England. ... This article is about the county of Essex in England. ... Lincoln (pronounced Lin-kun) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England, a bridging point over the River Witham that flows to Boston. ...


The settlement remained a regional centre during the 350 years after the Roman occupation, until about AD 400. Roman roads and walled enclosures can still be seen in the area.


Saxon and Viking age

After the Romans had left, Saxons took over the land on and around Castle Hill. Their grave goods have been found in the area. During Anglo-Saxon times Cambridge benefited from good trade links across the otherwise hard-to-travel fenlands. By the 7th century, however, visitors from nearby Ely reported that Cambridge had declined severely. Cambridge is mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as Grantebrycge. This is the earliest known reference to a bridge at Cambridge. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ...


The arrival of the Vikings in Cambridge was recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 875. Viking rule, the Danelaw, had been imposed by 878. The Vikings' vigorous trading habits caused Cambridge to grow rapidly. During this period the centre of the town shifted from Castle Hill on the left bank of the river to the area now known as the Quayside on the right bank. After the end of the Viking period the Saxons enjoyed a brief return to power, building St Bene't's [1] church in 1025, which still stands in Bene't Street. The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Green: Danelaw The Danelaw (from the Old English Dena lagu, Danish: Danelagen ) is an 11th century name for an area of northern and eastern England under the administrative control of the Vikings (or Danes, or Norsemen) from the late 9th century. ... The left bank of a river is the bank on the left when looking in the direction of flow towards the sea. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Norman times

In 1068, two years after his conquest of England, William of Normandy built a castle on Castle Hill. Like the rest of the new kingdom, Cambridge fell under the control of the King and his deputies. The distinctive Round Church dates from this period. By Norman times the name of the town had mutated to Grentabrige or Cantebrigge (Grantbridge), while the river that flowed through it was called the Granta. William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Holy Sepulchre Cambridge . The Holy Sepulchre, commonly known as the Round Church, is a church in Cambridge, England. ...


Over time the name of the town changed to Cambridge, while the river Cam was still known as the Granta — indeed the Upper River (the stretch between the Millpond in Cambridge and Grantchester) is correctly known as the Granta to this day. The Welsh language name of the town remains Caergrawnt (roughly analogous to Grantchester, which is also the name of a village near Cambridge). It was only later that the river became known as the Cam, by analogy with the name Cambridge. The University, formed 1209, uses a Latin adjective cantabrigiensis (often contracted to "Cantab") to mean "of Cambridge", but this is obviously a back-formation from the English name. Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Grantchester is a village on the River Cam or Granta in Cambridgeshire, England. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A retronym is a type of neologism coined for an old object or concept whose original name has come to be used for something else, is no longer unique, or is otherwise inappropriate or misleading. ...


Beginnings of the university

In 1209, students escaping from hostile townspeople in Oxford fled to Cambridge and formed a university there. The oldest college that still exists, Peterhouse, was founded in 1284. One of the most impressive buildings in Cambridge, King's College Chapel, was begun in 1446 by King Henry VI. The project was completed in 1515 during the reign of King Henry VIII. This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Full name Peterhouse Motto - Named after St Peter Previous names The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely St Peter’s College Established 1284 Sister College(s) Merton College Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates 253 Postgraduates 125 Homepage Boatclub The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ...

Pembroke College was the third college to be founded in the University of Cambridge
Pembroke College was the third college to be founded in the University of Cambridge

Cambridge University Press originated with a printing licence issued in 1534. Hobson's Conduit, the first project to bring clean drinking water to the town centre, was built in 1610 (by the Hobson of Hobson's choice). Parts of it survive today. Addenbrooke's Hospital was founded in 1766. The railway and station were built in 1845. According to legend, the University dictated their location: well away from the centre of town, so that the possibility of quick access to London would not distract students from their work. However, there is no basis for this in written record. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2136 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2136 pixel, file size: 2. ... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College(s) Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates ~420 Postgraduates ~240 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Hobsons Conduit was built from 1610 to 1614 by Thomas Hobson to bring fresh water into the city of Cambridge from Nine Wells, near the village of Shelford [1]. It is now a historical relic and what remains of the conduit flows beside Trumpington Street and past Brookside, where... For other uses, see Hobsons choice (disambiguation). ... Addenbrookes Hospital is a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, England, with strong links to the University of Cambridge. ...


Despite having a university, Cambridge was not granted its city charter until 1951. Cambridge does not have a cathedral, which was traditionally a pre-requisite for city status. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... This page is a list of Church of England Dioceses, along with their geographic location and the foundation dates of those founded in the modern era, i. ...


Original historical documents relating to the town of Cambridge (as opposed to the university or colleges within Cambridge) are held by Cambridgeshire Archives and Local Studies at the County Record Office Cambridge and at the Cambridgeshire Collection. These records include original registers for the parish churches dating back to the 1530s, local government records, maps, photographs, and records of some businesses, schools and charities. Cambridgeshire Archives and Local Studies Service (CALS) is a UK local government institution which collects and preserves archives, other historical documents and printed material relating to the modern county of Cambridgeshire, which includes the former counties of Huntingdonshire and the Isle of Ely. ...


Cambridge today

The market in the centre of Cambridge, with Great St Mary's Church in the background · more
The market in the centre of Cambridge, with Great St Mary's Church in the background · more

Drawing on its links with the University, the Cambridge area today is sometimes referred to as Silicon Fen, due to the growth of high tech businesses and technology incubators that have sprung up in the series of science parks and other developments in and around the city. Such companies include CSR, world leader in Bluetooth chips, Acorn Computers and Sinclair. Cambridge was also the home of Pye Limited famous in the last century for early wireless and TV sets. In later years Pye evolved into several other companies including Pye Telecommunications (now Sepura, famous for TETRA radio equipment). Another major business is Marshall Aerospace located on the eastern edge of the city. Such businesses and their early stage precursors are well networked within the Cambridge Network. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 226 KB)The market in Cambridge, with Great St Marys Church in the background. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 226 KB)The market in Cambridge, with Great St Marys Church in the background. ... Silicon Fen (sometimes the Cambridge Cluster) is the name given to the region around Cambridge, England, which is home to a large cluster of high-tech businesses, especially those related to software, electronics, and biotechnology. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A science park is a property development designed for a concentration of high tech or science related businesses. ... CSR (LSE: CSR), or previously Cambridge Silicon Radio is a company based in Cambridge, England whose main product line is a single-chip implementation of the Bluetooth standard for radio-signal communication between devices. ... Bluetooth logo This article is about the electronic protocol named after Harald Bluetooth Gormson. ... forever . ... Sinclair Research Ltd was a home computer company founded by Sir Clive Sinclair in Cambridge, England. ... Pye Ltd. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Genera More than 150[1] Look up tetra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Marshall companies have been internationally associated with aerospace engineering for over ninety years. ... The Cambridge Network is a networking organization for business people and academics working in technology fields in the Cambridge area (sometimes called Silicon Fen). ...


The University was joined by the larger part of Anglia Ruskin University, and the educational reputation has led to other bodies (such as the Open University in East Anglia) basing themselves in the city. Anglia Ruskin University, formerly Anglia Polytechnic, is a university in England, with campuses in Cambridge and Chelmsford. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ...


The University has a large number of museums that are open to the public.


Housing estates

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the size of the city was greatly increased by several large council estates planned to hold London's overspill. The biggest impact has been on the area north of the river, which is now home to the estates of Arbury, East Chesterton and King's Hedges, whilst there are many smaller estates to the south of the city. Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... London overspill is the term given to the communities created - largely consisting of council houses - as a result of the policy of moving residents out of London, England into other towns. ... , Arbury is a district and electoral ward of the city of Cambridge, England. ... Kings Hedges is an electoral ward in the north of the city of Cambridge. ...


Government

Local government

See also: Cambridge local elections

Cambridge is a non-metropolitan district served by a city council. The city council's headquarters are in the Guildhall [2], an imposing building in the market square. Cambridge is also served by Cambridgeshire County Council. One third of Cambridge Council is elected each year, followed by one year without election. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ...


For electoral purposes the city is divided into the following wards: Abbey, Arbury, Castle, Cherry Hinton, Coleridge, East Chesterton, King's Hedges, Market, Newnham, Petersfield, Queen Edith's, Romsey, Trumpington, West Chesterton. , Arbury is a district and electoral ward of the city of Cambridge, England. ... Cherry Hinton is a town in Cambridgeshire, England. ... Arms of the former Chesterton Rural District Council Chesterton is a suburb in the northeast corner of Cambridge, England. ... Kings Hedges is an electoral ward in the north of the city of Cambridge. ... Newnham is a part of Cambridge, England. ... Trumpington is a suburb of the city of Cambridge, UK. Category: ...


The political composition [3] of the city wards of the county council after the May 2005 elections was:

The political composition of the city council after the May 2006 elections was: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...

  • 29 Liberal Democrat councillors
  • 13 Labour councillors

The Liberal Democrats have controlled the city council since 2000.


Westminster

The parliamentary constituency of Cambridge covers most of the city. David Howarth (Liberal Democrat) was elected Member of Parliament (MP) at the 2005 general election, winning the seat from the sitting MP, Labour's Anne Campbell. Some areas, however — corresponding largely to the Queen Edith's and Trumpington wards[4] — lie in the South Cambridgeshire constituency, whose MP is Andrew Lansley (Conservative), first elected in 1997. Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... Cambridge is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... David Howarth David Ross Howarth (born November 10, 1958) is a British Liberal Democrat politician and Member of Parliament for Cambridge. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Anne Campbell (born April 6, 1940) is an English politician. ... South Cambridgeshire is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Andrew Lansley Andrew David Lansley CBE MP (born 11 December 1956) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ...


The University used to have a seat in the House of Commons, Sir Isaac Newton being one of the most notable holders. The Cambridge University constituency was abolished under 1948 legislation, and ceased at the dissolution of Parliament for the 1950 general election, along with the other university constituencies. The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Cambridge University was a university constituency electing two members to the House of Commons, from 1603 to 1950. ... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... A university constituency is a constituency, used in elections to a legislature, that represents a university rather than a geographical area. ...


Transport

Roads

Because of its rapid growth since the twentieth century, Cambridge has a congested road network. Several major roads intersect at Cambridge. The M11 motorway from east London terminates here. The A14 (formerly A604 and A45) east-west trunk route skirts the northern edge of the city. This is a major freight route connecting the port of Felixstowe on the east coast with the Midlands, North Wales, the west coast and Ireland. The A14 is often congested, particularly the section between Huntingdon and Cambridge where the east-west traffic is merged with the A1 to M11 north-south traffic on a 2-lane dual carriageway. The A10, a former Roman road from north London, passes round the city on its way to Ely and King's Lynn. Other roads connect the city with Bedford, St Neots, Newmarket and Colchester. This page is about the M11 motorway in England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The A14 is a major road in England, running from Felixstowe to the junction of the M1 and M6 motorways near Rugby. ... , For the Aircraft manufacturer, see Seaplane Experimental Station, Felixstowe Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the country. ... Huntingdon is a town in the county of Cambridgeshire in East Anglia, England. ... This page is about the A1 road in Great Britain. ... This page is about the M11 motorway in England. ... The A10 is a major road in England. ... Not to be confused with Romans road. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... Kings Lynn is a town and port in the English county of Norfolk. ... Bedford is the county town of the English county of Bedfordshire. ... , Not to be confused with St Neot. ... This article is about the town in England. ...


The city has a ring road about 2 km in diameter, inside which there are traffic restrictions which have successfully improved conditions for pedestrians, cyclists and bus users, and reduced congestion. It has a well developed bus service including five Park and Ride sites encouraging motorists to park near the city's edge. a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...


Rail

The front of Cambridge Station
The front of Cambridge Station

Cambridge railway station was built in 1845 with a platform designed to take two full-length trains, one of the longest in the country. Cambridge has direct rail links to King's Cross (via Hitchin and the East Coast Main Line) and Liverpool Street (via the West Anglia Main Line) stations in London. There is a direct shuttle service to London King's Cross every half hour during peak hours, taking only 45 minutes to reach London. It is also linked to King's Lynn and Ely (via the Fen Line), Norwich (via the Breckland Line), Leicester, Birmingham, Ipswich and as well as London Stansted Airport. The important UK rail hub of Peterborough is also within reach of Cambridge. The railway service connecting Cambridge and Oxford, known as the Varsity Line, was discontinued in 1968. Image File history File linksMetadata Cambridgefront. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cambridgefront. ... The front of Cambridge station, showing the arms of several Cambridge Colleges Cambridge railway station is a railway station serving the city of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire, England. ... The front of Cambridge station, showing the arms of several Cambridge Colleges Cambridge railway station is a railway station serving the city of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire, England. ... Kings Cross station (often spelt Kings Cross on platform signs) is a railway station in the district of the same name in northeast central London. ... , Hitchin is a town in Hertfordshire, England, and has an estimated population of 30,360. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ... Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station and connected London Underground station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, the main financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... The West Anglia Main Line is one of the two main lines which run from London Liverpool Street, the other being the Great Eastern Main Line. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Kings Lynn is a town and port in the English county of Norfolk. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... The Fen Line runs from Cambridge in Cambridgeshire to Kings Lynn in Norfolk, in East Anglia, England. ... This article is about the English city. ... The Breckland Line runs from Cambridge in Cambridgeshire to Norwich in Norfolk, in East Anglia, England. ... Leicester city centre, looking towards the Clock Tower Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city and unitary authority in the English East Midlands. ... Birmingham (pron. ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced ) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Varsity Line (or Oxford and Cambridge Line) is an informal name for the railway service which formerly linked the university cities of Oxford and Cambridge, operated by the London and North Western Railway and then British Railways. ...


Air

Cambridge City Airport is owned by Marshall Aerospace. The runway can accommodate an unladen Boeing 747 or MD-11, but there is no regular scheduled service and it is mostly used by business and leisure flights. In Summer 2004 a charter service to Jersey was operated by Aurigny Air Services using Saab 340 turboprop aircraft. A dealer in fibreglass-moulded light monoplanes is also based here. Removal of Marshalls to a site away from the city, with development of the airport site for housing, is a possibility over the next 5-10 years. Cambridge Airport (IATA: CBG, ICAO: EGSC) is a small regional airport located in south-eastern England, near the village of Teversham, 1. ... The Marshall companies have been internationally associated with aerospace engineering for over ninety years. ... The Boeing 747, commonly nicknamed the Jumbo Jet, is a long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing. ... The McDonnell Douglas MD-11 is an American three-engine medium to long-range widebody airliner, with two engines mounted on underwing pylons and a third engine at the base of the vertical stabilizer. ... A charter airline is one that operates charter flights, that is flights that take place outside normal schedules, by a hiring arrangement with a particular customer. ... Aurigny Air Services is an airline based in Guernsey, Channel Islands. ... The Saab 340 is a two-engine turboprop aircraft designed and initially produced by a partnership between Saab and Fairchild in a 65:35 ratio. ... A schematic diagram showing the operation of a turboprop engine. ... It has been suggested that Fiber-reinforced plastic be merged into this article or section. ...


The family run business, Suckling Airways, now trading as ScotAirways, used to make scheduled flights from Cambridge to Amsterdam Schiphol Airport. ScotAirways is an airline based in Dundee, Scotland. ... Schiphol (IATA: AMS, ICAO: EHAM) (municipality Haarlemmermeer) is the Netherlands main airport. ...


Major airports, such as both Luton and Stansted, are within a convenient driving distance.


Cycling

As a university town lying on fairly flat ground and with traffic congestion, Cambridge has a large number of cyclists. Many residents also prefer cycling to driving in the narrow, busy streets, giving the city the highest level of cycle use in the UK. According to the 2001 census, 25% of residents travelled to work by cycle. A few roads within the city are adapted for cycling, including separate traffic lights for cycle lanes and cycle contraflows on streets which are otherwise one-way; the city also benefits from parks which have shared use paths. There are, however, no separate cycle paths within the city centre. Despite the high levels of cycling, expenditure on cycling infrastructure is around the national average of 0.3% of the transport budget. There are a few cycle routes in the surrounding countryside and the city is now linked to the National Cycle Network. The main organisation campaigning to improve conditions for cyclists in Cambridge is Cambridge Cycling Campaign. The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ...


Bike theft in the city is a problem, with over 3000 bicycles reported stolen between April 2005 and March 2006. The actual number is believed to be higher as many thefts are not reported to the police.[5]


Park and ride

There are five park and ride sites in Cambridge that operate Monday–Saturday with three (Trumpington, Madingley Road and Newmarket Road) also operating on Sundays between 9am and 6pm. All the sites are staffed during opening hours. Overnight parking is not permitted at any of the sites. All sites are secured with barriers after the last bus, but these rise to allow traffic to leave after hours. All sites have height barriers except Babraham Road and Trumpington, which are suitable for camper vans, as larger spaces are provided. a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... A campervan is a self-propelled vehicle that provides both transport and sleeping accommodation. ...


Sport

Punting on the Cam river is a popular recreation in Cambridge
Punting on the Cam river is a popular recreation in Cambridge

Cambridge played a unique role in the invention of modern football as the game's first set of rules were drawn up by members of the university in 1848. The Cambridge Rules were first played in Parker's Piece and had a "defining influence on the 1863 Football Association rules."[6] Punting in a crowd, on the Cam. ... Punting in a crowd, on the Cam. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Cambridge Rules, were a code of football drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 by H. de Winton and J. C. Thring. ... Parkers Piece is a small, nearly square green and common located near the centre of Cambridge, UK. Known today chiefly as a spot for picnics and occasional fairs, it was in the nineteenth century one of the principal sports grounds used by students at the University of Cambridge and... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ...


Cambridge's most successful sports team over recent years is its rugby union club. After three successive promotions they managed to survive their debut season in National Division Two 2006/07. The club's home ground is at West Renault Park on Granchester Road in the south west corner of the city. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official Website www. ... National Division Two is the third level of domestic Rugby Union competition in England. ... West Renault Park is the home ground of Cambridge Rugby Union Football Club, situated on Granchester Road in the South West of the City it is named after the clubs main sponsor. ...


The city is home to Cambridge United F.C., who played in the Football League at the Abbey Stadium from 1970 to 2005, when they were relegated to Conference National. When relegation became inevitable the club was placed in administration with substantial debts, but it emerged from administration in time for the 2005–06 season. The city's other football club Cambridge City F.C. play in the Conference South at Milton Road in Chesterton. Satellite town Histon on the northern edge of the city is home to Conference National side Histon FC. Cambridge United Football Club (also known as United and The Us or simply Cambridge) is a professional football club from Cambridge, England. ... This is a list of football clubs located in England and the leagues and divisions they play in (though note that not all play in the English football league system). ... The Main Stand of the Abbey Stadium The Abbey Stadium, in Cambridge, England, is a football stadium. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... Administration is a procedure under the insolvency laws of a number of common law jurisdictions which functions as a rescue mechanism for insolvent companies and allows them to carry on running their business. ... The 2005–06 season was the 126th season of competitive football in England. ... Cambridge City Football Club is an English association football club currently playing in the Conference South. ... Conference South (currently billed as Blue Square Southern for sponsorship reasons) is one of the second divisions of the Football Conference in England, taking its place immediately below the Conference National. ... Arms of the former Chesterton Rural District Council Chesterton is a suburb in the northeast corner of Cambridge, England. ... Categories: ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... Histon Football Club is an English football team based in the twin villages of Histon and Impington, approximately 5 kilometres (3 miles) north of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire. ...


Cambridge Eagles rugby league team play in the National Conference League East Section during the summer months, often drawing on rugby union players keen to continue playing rugby throughout the year. Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ...


British American Football League club Cambridgeshire Cats play at Coldham's Common. The season runs from April to August. The team benefits from the experience of US servicemen from the nearby bases, but due to league quotas, the majority of players are British. Logo of the British American Football League The British American Football League (BAFL) is the United Kingdoms primary American Football league. ... The Cambridgeshire Cats are an American football team based in Cambridge. ...


Cambridge is also known for its university sporting events against Oxford, especially the rugby union Varsity Match and the Boat Race. These are followed by people across the globe, many of whom have no connection to the institutions themselves. The Cambridge Dampers Club (punting) used to take part in the Scottish Boat Race, winning the event on a number of occasions. The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The Varsity Match usually refers to the annual rugby union fixture played between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge in England. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ...


Motorcycle speedway racing took place at the Greyhound Stadium in Newmarket Road in 1939. It is not known if this venue operated in other years. The team raced as Newmarket as the meeetings were organised by the Newmarket Motorcycle Club.


The City Council hosts details of Local Sports Clubs. [7]


Health

Cambridge is well served by medical care, with several smaller medical centres dotted around the city, along with Addenbrooke's Hospital a learning and teaching hospital and one of the largest in the United Kingdom, also functioning as a centre for medical research. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 225 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by the user, from the top of the multistory car park at Addenbrookes hospital. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 225 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by the user, from the top of the multistory car park at Addenbrookes hospital. ... Addenbrookes Hospital is a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, England, with strong links to the University of Cambridge. ... Addenbrookes Hospital is a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, England, with strong links to the University of Cambridge. ... Medical research (or experimental medicine) is basic research and applied research conducted to aid the body of knowledge in the field of medicine. ...


Multicultural Cambridge

For its size, Cambridge has a relatively diverse ethnic population.[citation needed] This is mainly due to people from other countries coming to study at the Universities. The area around Mill Road has a large Turkish population, and is home to many Asian food stores and the Abu Bakr Mosque.


Religion

Great St Mary's Church marks the centre of Cambridge, whilst the Senate House on the left is the centre of the University. Gonville and Caius College is in the background.
Great St Mary's Church marks the centre of Cambridge, whilst the Senate House on the left is the centre of the University. Gonville and Caius College is in the background.

Cambridge has an active Christian population and many churches, some of which form a significant part of the city's architectural landscape. Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... St Mary the Great with St Michael, also known as Great St Marys Church, is the church of the University of Cambridge, England. ... Class lists for Part III of the Mathematical Tripos, June 2005 The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto - Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Graduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known as Caius (though pronounced...


A Cambridge-based family and youth organisation, Romsey Mill, had its centre re-dedicated in 2007 by the Archbishop of York, and is quoted as an example of best practice in a study[8] into social inclusion by the East of England Regional Assembly. The Romsey Mill is a Youth and Community Centre located in Romsey Town, Cambridge, England. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... East of England region The East of England Regional Assembly is the regional assembly for the East of England region of the United Kingdom. ...


University

Great St Mary's Church has the status of being the "University Church". Many of the University colleges contain chapels that hold services according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church of England, while the chapel of St Edmund's College is Roman Catholic. There is a mosque used by Muslim residents and students, an Orthodox synagogue (belonging to the university Jewish Society) and the Beth Shalom Reform synagogue. St Mary the Great with St Michael, also known as Great St Marys Church, is the church of the University of Cambridge, England. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto per revelationem et rationem through revelation and reason Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


The city also has a number of theological colleges for training clergy for ordination into a number of denominations, with affiliations to both the University of Cambridge and Anglia Ruskin University. The Cambridge Theological Federation is an association of theological colleges in Cambridge. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ...


Cambridge in fiction

  • In the 1950s, the English children's writer Philippa Pearce created a fictionalised version of Cambridge known as "Castleford" (not connected to the real town of the same name in West Yorkshire). It appears in several of her books, most notably Tom's Midnight Garden and Minnow on the Say. The main distinguishing point between "Castleford" and the real Cambridge is that this "Castleford" does not have a university.
  • Tom Sharpe is also a Cambridge-based author who has written fictional accounts of teaching at Cambridge Technical College (now Anglia Ruskin University) and of Cambridge college life. His fictional "Porterhouse College" appears in many of his novels.
  • Susanna Gregory wrote a series of novels set in 14th-century Cambridge and featuring a teacher of medicine and sleuth named Matthew Bartholomew.
  • Douglas Adams was at one time a resident of Cambridge, and parts of his novel Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency are set in the city. This novel was partially reworked from his unbroadcast Doctor Who serial Shada, which also included scenes in Cambridge. The television serial Shada was filmed in Cambridge, but was never finished due to strike action. The unfinished story was available to buy on video but is not yet available on DVD.
  • Sylvia Plath wrote a number of short stories with a Cambridge setting which are published in the collection Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams. Plath was a resident of the city when she won a scholarship to the university.
  • Dame Rose Macaulay had strong connections to the city, and set part of her novel They Were Defeated in the city during the reign of Charles I.
  • Kate Atkinson used the town as the setting for her book Case Histories.
  • Michelle Spring wrote a series of novels about a Cambridge-based private detective, Laura Principal, beginning with Every Breath You Take (1994).
  • Rebecca Stott's Ghostwalk (2007) is set in the Cambridge of today and of Sir Isaac Newton's time.
  • Robert Harris's "Enigma" was partly set in Cambridge, when the leading character, Thomas Jericho, was sent to Kings College to recover from a nervous break down. Much of the story describes the centre and west of Cambridge in much detail. The story itself was set in the middle of world war two. The rest of the story was set in Bletchley Park.

[9] [10] Ann Philippa Pearce OBE (b. ... Arms of the former Castleford Borough Council Castleford is one of the five towns in the Wakefield borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near to Pontefract, with a population of 37,525 according to the 2001 Census. ... Toms Midnight Garden is a childrens novel by Philippa Pearce. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Great Expectations (disambiguation). ... Tom Sharpe (born March 30, 1928) is an English satirical author, born in London and educated at Lancing College and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Anglia Ruskin University, formerly Anglia Polytechnic, is a university in England, with campuses in Cambridge and Chelmsford. ... Susanna Gregory is the pseudonym of Elizabeth Cruwys, a Cambridge academic who was previously a coroners officer. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency is a novel by Douglas Adams. ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ... Shada is an unaired serial of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... Emilie Rose Macaulay, DBE (1 August 1881 - 30 October 1958), affectionately known as Emilie (her actual first name), was an English novelist. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... C. P. Snow, born Charles Percy Snow, (1905-1980) was a scientist and novelist. ... Strangers and Brothers is a series of novels by C.P.Snow, published between 1940 and 1974. ... College name Christ’s College Named after Jesus Christ Established 1505 Previously named God’s-house (1437-1505) Location St. ... Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970) was an English novelist. ... Full name The King’s College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College, Oxford Provost Prof. ... The Longest Journey (1907) is a Bildungsroman by E. M. Forster. ... E. M. Forsters Maurice Maurice is a novel attributed to E. M. Forster. ... Kate Atkinson (b. ... Robert Harris may refer to the following people: Rob Harris (curler), a Canadian curler. ...


Music

Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... George Roger Waters (born September 6, 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, guitarist, bassist, songwriter, and composer. ... Hills Road Sixth Form College (HRSFC) is a co-educational sixth form college in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. ... David Jon Gilmour CBE (born March 6, 1946 in Cambridge) is an English musician best known as a guitarist, singer, and songwriter in the band Pink Floyd. ... Katrina and the Waves were a pop rock band of the 1980s, best known for their smash hit Walking on Sunshine and their 1997 Eurovision Song Contest victory. ... The Soft Boys were an influential neo-psychedelic rock and roll band from Cambridge, England, formed in 1976 as Dennis and the Experts. ... The Broken Family Band are a critically acclaimed, four piece alt. ... Nicholas Rodney Drake (June 19, 1948 – November 25, 1974) was an English singer-songwriter and musician best known for his acoustic, autumnal songs. ... Julian Cope (born Julian David Cope, on 21 October 1957) is a British rock musician, writer, antiquary, musicologist, and poet who came to prominence as singer of Liverpool post-punk band The Teardrop Explodes in 1978. ... Anthony Howard Wilson (20 February 1950 – 10 August 2007) was an English record label owner, radio presenter, TV show host, nightclub manager, impresario and journalist for Granada Television and the BBC. Wilson, commonly known as Tony Wilson, was the music mogul behind some of Manchesters most successful bands. ...

Festivals and events

  • Cambridge Midsummer Fair is one of the oldest fairs in the UK and at one point was possibly the largest medieval fair in Europe. Today it exists primarily as an annual funfair with the vestige of a market attached.
  • Cambridge Folk Festival is one of the largest festivals of folk music in the UK
  • Strawberry Fair, is a free, public fair. It is held every first Saturday in June on Midsummer Common.
  • Cambridge Beer Festival, which began in 1973, takes place on Jesus Green for one week in May every year and offers nearly 200 different beers[11].
  • The Cambridge Corporate Gateway in April and October provides an opportunity for the World's Best Companies to meet partners from the world of science and technology.
  • The Cambridge Film Festival is held annually in July and is considered to be one of the nation's best.
  • The Pink Festival is held annually as a one day event and is the largest free LGBT festival in Europe.

Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... A travelling funfair has many attractions, including adult or thrill rides, childrens rides, and sideshows consisting of games of skill, strength, or luck. ... The Cambridge folk festival is renowned for its eclectic mix of music and a wide definition of what might be considered folk. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... A fair held in Cambridge, United Kingdom. ... Midsummer Common is an area of common land in central Cambridge, UK. The Cambridge Midsummer Fair held on the common is one of the oldest fairs in the UK and at one point was possibly the largest medieval fair in Europe. ... The Summer Cambridge Beer Festival is the longest running CAMRA beer festival in the UK having started in 1974. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Other information

Cambridge is twinned with: Fairtrade Town is a status awarded by the Fairtrade Foundation in the United Kingdom and Channel Islands, describing an area which is committed to the promotion of Fairtrade-labelled goods. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Szeged and the Tisza river. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cambridge

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The following is a list and brief history of the bridges over the River Cam in Cambridge, England. ... Parkers Piece is a small, nearly square green and common located near the centre of Cambridge, UK. Known today chiefly as a spot for picnics and occasional fairs, it was in the nineteenth century one of the principal sports grounds used by students at the University of Cambridge and... Newnham is a part of Cambridge, England. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The Cambridge Evening News is a paper distributed in the early afternoon in Cambridge Mon - Sat. ... The Cambridge Network is a networking organization for business people and academics working in technology fields in the Cambridge area (sometimes called Silicon Fen). ... The followed museums are in Cambridge, England: Cambridge & County Folk Museum — Local life. ... The Gog Magog Downs (also known as the Gog Magog Hills or simply the Gogs) are a range of low chalk hills extending for several miles to the southeast of Cambridge. ...

Panoramic photo gallery

'
Trinity Street
Trinity Street
Kings Parade
Kings Parade
Silver Street
Silver Street
Quayside
Quayside
View looking over North-West Cambridge from the top of the Lion Yard car park

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixel Image in higher resolution (3797 × 600 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixel Image in higher resolution (3797 × 600 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixel Image in higher resolution (3805 × 600 pixel, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 126 pixel Image in higher resolution (3805 × 600 pixel, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 130 pixel Image in higher resolution (3686 × 600 pixel, file size: 296 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 130 pixel Image in higher resolution (3686 × 600 pixel, file size: 296 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 131 pixel Image in higher resolution (3656 × 600 pixel, file size: 363 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 131 pixel Image in higher resolution (3656 × 600 pixel, file size: 363 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author Ian Howard Photo taken by Ian Howard www. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 401 pixelsFull resolution (5213 × 2615 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 401 pixelsFull resolution (5213 × 2615 pixel, file size: 1. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.stbenets.org.uk
  2. ^ http://www.cambridge.gov.uk/ccm/content/itcm/maps/guildhall-information.en
  3. ^ http://www.cambridge.gov.uk/elections
  4. ^ http://www.election-maps.co.uk/
  5. ^ Raids 'shockwave' for bicycle theft gangs. Cambridge Evening News (27 July 2006).
  6. ^ Cambridge… the birthplace of football?!. bbc.co.uk.
  7. ^ http://www.cambridge.gov.uk/sportsclubs
  8. ^ EERA social inclusion policy, ch. 3
  9. ^ Graham Chainey, "A Literary History of Cambridge" (Cambridge, 1985, 1995; ISBN 0-907115-25-X)
  10. ^ Martin Garrett, "Cambridge: a Cultural and Literary History" (Oxford, 2004; ISBN 1-902669-79-7).
  11. ^ http://www.cambridgebeerfestival.com/summer/images/34th_poster.png

is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Places with city status in the United Kingdom


Coordinates: 52°12′29″N, 0°7′21″E Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Lisburn UK Parliament: Lagan Valley European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: (+44) 02892 Post Town: Lisburn Postal District(s): BT27, BT28 Population (2001) 71,465 Website: www. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cambridge University Press (63 words)
Cambridge University Press publishes the finest academic and educational writing from around the world.
As a department of the University of Cambridge, its purpose is to further the University's objective of advancing knowledge, education, learning, and research.
Cambridge is not just a leading British publisher, it is the oldest printer and publisher in the world and one of the largest academic publishers globally.
The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes. 1907–21 (184 words)
The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes.
Considered the most important work of literary history and criticism ever published, the Cambridge History contains over 303 chapters and 11,000 pages, with essay topics ranging from poetry, fiction, drama and essays to history, theology and political writing.
The set encompasses a wide selection of writing on orators, humorists, poets, newspaper columnists, religious leaders, economists, Native Americans, song writers, and even non-English writing, such as Yiddish and Creole.
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