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Encyclopedia > California Bungalow
A typical Bungalow in Louisville's Deer Park Neighborhood
A typical Bungalow in Louisville's Deer Park Neighborhood

California Bungalows, commonly called simply bungalows in America, are a form of residential structure that were widely popular across America and, to some extent, the world around the years 1910 to 1925. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 145 KB) Typical Bungalow in Louisville, Kentuckys Highlands neighborhood. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 145 KB) Typical Bungalow in Louisville, Kentuckys Highlands neighborhood. ... Nickname: Derby City or, River City Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Deer Park is a neighborhood four miles southeast of downtown Louisville, Kentucky, USA. The neighborhood, named for the deer-filled wooded farmlands that occupied the land prior to subdivision, was developed from 1890 through the 1920s, with the last development beginning in 1935. ... A bungalow is any single story house. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... -1... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents


Exterior Features

Bungalows are 1 or 1 1/2 storey houses , with sloping roofs and eaves with unenclosed rafters, and typically feature a gable (or an attic vent designed to look like one) over main portion of the house. Ideally, bungalows were horizontal in massing, and are integrated with the earth by use of local materials and transitional plantings. This helps create the signature look most people associate with the California Bungalow. An eave is the edge of a roof. ... A rafter is a structural member, a type of beam, which supports the roof of a building. ...


Bungalows commonly have wood shingle, horizontal siding or stucco exteriors, as well as brick or stone exterior chimneys and a partial-width front porch. Larger bungalows might have asymmetrical "L" shaped porches. The porches were often enclosed at a later date, in response to increased street noise. A "California" bungalow (no matter where built) is not made of brick, but in other bungalows, most notably in the Chicago area, this is commonplace. Because trees were plentiful from the earliest days of settlement of North America, the use of wood for all aspects of construction is not surprising. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A weathered brick wall. ...


A variation called the "Airplane" bungalow has a much smaller area on its second floor, centered on the structure, and is thought to look like the cockpit of an early plane.


Interior Features

Unlike earlier private homes, true bungalows do not include quarters for servants, and have a simple living room, entered directly from the front door, in place of parlors and sitting rooms as well as a smaller kitchen. The focal point of the living room is the fireplace, and the living room often has a broad opening into the dining room. I HAVE ONE!!!! A living room (or sitting room, especially in commonwealth English, also called lounge room in Australia) is a room for entertaining guests, reading, watching TV, or other activities. ... Parlour (or parlor), from the Fr. ... A living room (or sitting room, especially in commonwealth English, also called lounge room in Australia) is a room for entertaining guests, reading, watching TV, or other activities. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation. ... A fireplace with a burning fire. ... A dining room is a room for eating. ...


All common areas are on the first floor. Though the ceilings are lower than in homes of Victorian architecture, they are usually higher than in ranch and other homes built later. Attics are located under the sloping roof. The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles during the Victorian era: Neoclassicism Gothic Revival Italianate Second Empire Neo-Grec Romanesque Revival (Includes Richardsonian Revival) Renaissance Revival Queen Anne Jacobethan architecture (the precusor to the Queen Anne style) British Arts and Crafts movement painted... A Ranch is an area of land, including buildings and structures, given primarily to the grazing of livestock on rangeland. ...


History

The bungalow actually traces its origins to the Indian province of Bengal. The native thatched roof huts were adapted by the British, who built bungalows as houses for administrators and as summer retreats. Refined and popularized in California, the first California house dubbed a bungalow was designed by the San Francisco architect A. Page Brown in the early 1890s. Bengal, known as Bôngo (Bengali: বঙ্গ), Bangla (বাংলা), Bôngodesh (বঙ্গদেশ), or Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ) in Bangla (Bengali), is a region in the northeast of South Asia. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ...


The bungalow became popular because it met the needs of changing times in which the lower middle class were moving from apartments to private houses in great numbers. Bungalows were modest, inexpensive and low-profile. Before World War I, a bungalow could be built for as little as $900, the price rose to around $3,500 after the war. Bungalow designs were spread by the practice of using mail-order plans available from illustrated catalogs, sometimes a few alterations were made based on local practice or conditions. A variety of firms offered precut homes, which were shipped by rail or ship and assembled on site. These were most common in locations without a strong existing construction industry, or for company towns, to be built in a short time. The majority of bungalows did include some elements of mass production; typically doors, windows, and built-in furnishings such as bookcases, desks, or folding beds were sourced from lumber yards or from catalogs. Combatants Entente Powers Central Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties > 5 million military deaths > 3 million military deaths {{{notes}}} World War I, also known as the First World War and (before 1939) the Great War, the War of the Nations, War to End All Wars was a world...


Bungalows can be found in the older neighborhoods of most American cities. In fact, they were so popular for a time that many cities have what is called a "Bungalow Belt" of homes built in the 1920s. These neighborhoods were often clustered along streetcar lines as they extended into the suburbs. Bungalows were built in smaller groups than is typical today, often one to three at a time. Examples of neighborhoods with a high concentration of bungalows include Bungalow Heaven in Pasadena, California, North Park in San Diego, California, and Park Hill and Washington Park in Denver. Pasadena is a city located in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Nickname: Americas Finest City Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Park Hill is a housing estate in Sheffield, England. ... Washington Park was the name given to two different major league baseball parks in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, located at 3rd St. ... Nickname: The Mile-High City Motto: Official website: http://www. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
What is a Bungalow? (913 words)
The mania for bungalows marked a rare occasion in which serious architecture was found outside the realm of the rich.
The bungalow craze took off after the turn of the century, during an era in which Americans were obsessed with the notion of health or simply attracted to economic opportunities in the booming West.
Ironically, the bungalow that had once been the symbol of retreat to the countryside became the architecture of the city and its suburbs.
California Bungalow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (647 words)
California Bungalows, commonly called simply bungalows in America, are a form of residential structure that were widely popular across America and, to some extent, the world around the years 1910 to 1925.
Bungalows are 1 or 1 1/2 storey houses, with sloping roofs and eaves with unenclosed rafters, and typically feature a gable (or an attic vent designed to look like one) over main portion of the house.
Bungalows commonly have wood shingle, horizontal siding or stucco exteriors, as well as brick or stone exterior chimneys and a partial-width front porch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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