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Encyclopedia > Calendar of Saints (Lutheran)
Part of the series on
Lutheranism
Luther's Seal
Beginnings

Christianity
Protestant Reformation
Roman Catholicism
Mr wadawits smells Luthers seal Lutheranism is a Christian tradition based upon the main theological insights of Martin Luther. ... lutheran seal File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Luther seal The Luther seal is the symbol of the Lutheran church. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement in the 16th century to reform the Catholic Church in Western Europe. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...

People

Martin Luther
Philipp Melanchthon
Frederick the Wise
Martin Chemnitz
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
C. F. W. Walther
Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Portrait of Philipp Melanchthon, by Lucas Cranach the Elder. ... Friedrich III (January 17, 1463 — May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death. ... Martin Chemnitz (1522-1586) was an eminent Lutheran theologian, churchman, and confessor, born in Treuenbrietzen, Brandenburg on November 9, 1522, the day before Martin Luther had been born in 1483. ... Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (September 6, 1711, Einbeck, Germany – October 7, 1787, Trappe, Pennsylvania), originally Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was a Lutheran clergyman who is viewed as the founder of the Lutheran Church in the United States. ... Carl Ferdinand Wilhelm (C.F.W.) Walther (October 25, 1811 - May 17, 1887), was the first President of the Lutheran Church _ Missouri Synod. ...

Book of Concord

Augsburg Confession
Apology of the Augsburg Confession
Luther's Large Catechism
Luther's Small Catechism
95 Theses
The Book of Concord or Concordia is a compilation of the major theological documents of early Lutheranism. ... The Augsburg Confession, in Latin Confessio Augustana, is the central document of the Lutheran reformation, which was a reaction against the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Apology of the Augsburg Confession was formulated by Philip Melanchthon as the response to the Roman Confutation against the Augsburg Confession. ... Luthers Large Catechism was written by Martin Luther and published in April of 1529. ... Luthers Small Catechism was written by Martin Luther and published in 1529 for the training of children. ... The 95 Theses. ...

Theology and Sacraments

Sacramental Union
Law and Gospel
Sola scriptura
Sola gratia
Sola fide
The Eucharist
Holy Baptism
Sacramental Union (Latin, unio sacramentalis; German, sacramentlich Einigkeit) is the Lutheran theological view of the Real Presence of the body and blood of Christ in the Christian Eucharist. ... The relationship between Gods Law and the Gospel is a major topic in Lutheran and Reformed theology. ... Sola scriptura (Latin By Scripture alone) is one of five important slogans of the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. ... Sola gratia, one of the five solas propounded to summarise the Reformers basic beliefs during the Protestant Reformation, it is a Latin term meaning grace alone. ... Sola fide (by faith alone), also historically known as the justification of faith, is a doctrine that distinguishes Protestant denominations from Catholicism, Eastern Christianity, and Restorationism in Christianity. ... The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament,[1] to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ...

Liturgy and Worship

Divine Service
Lutheran Calendar of Saints
Lutheran Book of Worship
Lutheran Service Book
The Divine Service is the liturgy of the Lutheran Church which is used during the celebration of the Eucharist. ... Lutheran Book of Worship is a hymnal and prayer book used by several Lutheran denominations in North America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Organizations

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Lutheran World Federation
Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod
International Lutheran Council
Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference
The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... LWF logo The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) is a global association of national and regional Lutheran churches headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. ... Official cross symbol of the Missouri Synod The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS) is the second-largest Lutheran body in the United States. ... The International Lutheran Council is a worldwide association of confessional Lutheran denominations. ... WELS Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a United States religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. ... The Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference (CELC) is the successor to the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America except that it is international in scope rather than restricted to North America. ...

This box: viewtalkedit

The Lutheran Calendar of Saints is a listing which details the primary annual festivals and events that are celebrated liturgically by the Lutheran Church. The calendar of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (and largely the one given below) is from Evangelical Lutheran Worship published in 2006 as a replacement for the 1970’s Lutheran Book of Worship. The elements of the calendar unique to the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod are from the Lutheran Service Book. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lutheran Book of Worship is a hymnal and prayer book used by several Lutheran denominations in North America. ... The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS) is the second-largest Lutheran body in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents


Structure

The Lutheran calendar operates on two different cycles, that of Christmas and that of Easter. Within these two cycles all events to be commemorated fall. Because Easter varies in date each year based on the vernal equinox and the phases of the moon, it is called a moveable feast (see: date of Easter). Dates affected by placement of Easter include the Baptism of our Lord, Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent, the start of Easter itself, Pentecost, and Holy Trinity. Advent, the other moveable season on the calendar, comes exactly four Sundays before the start of Christmas (if Christmas falls on a Sunday, that day does not count), or the Sunday closest to St. Andrew’s Day (November 30). Like the other Western Church calendars, the first Sunday of Advent is also the first day of the liturgical year. The events commemorated on the Lutheran calendar fall into three different categories: Festivals, Lesser Festivals, and Commemorations. Christmas is a Christian holiday held on December 25 which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... The current system for determining the date of Easter is often seen as presenting two significant problems: Its date varies from year to year (by the Western system of calculation, it can fall on any of 35 different dates of the Gregorian calendar). ... In Western Christianity, Lent is the period from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday, the day before Easter Sunday. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Ανδρέας Andreas, manly), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ...


Festivals

The Festivals are Nativity, Epiphany, the Baptism of our Lord, the Transfiguration, the Annunciation, Palm Sunday, Easter, the Ascension, Pentecost, Holy Trinity, All Saints, and Christ the King. Most of these festivals are tied to the moveable feast of Easter. Festivals take precedence over all other days, including Sundays, have their own collects and Eucharistic proper prefaces. Of the festivals, Christmas is considered to be twelve days in length (from December 25 until January 5) and Easter is fifty days in length (from Easter Sunday up to and inclusive of Pentecost). For Easter, Sundays are considered to be another part of the festival. For the Ascension which, falling on fortieth day of Easter, will always be on a Thursday, the festival is sometimes transferred to the Seventh Sunday of Easter in addition to or in place of the normal part of the Easter festival for that day. Christmas is a Christian holiday held on December 25 which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ as Angels look on in wonder in an Eastern Orthodox icon of the Theophany This article is about the Christian feast. ... The Baptism of the Lord is the name of a feast day observed in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Anglican (Episcopalian) Church. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... A key piece of the Paleologan Mannerism - the Annunciation icon from Ohrid. ... Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the church calendar observed by Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant Christians. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Christian doctrine of the Ascension holds that Jesus bodily ascended to heaven by His own power in presence of His disciples, following his resurrection. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas (hallow meaning holy, and mas meaning Mass), is a feast celebrated in their honour. ... This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


There is another type of day which, while not a festival, is considered to be equal with a festival. These days, called Days of Special Devotion, are Ash Wednesday and all the days of Holy Week, especially Good Friday. These particular days, like other festivals, automatically take precedence over any event on the calendar and sometimes even over other festivals. A good example of this would be in 2005 when Good Friday and the Annunciation fell on the same day (March 25). The Annunciation was transferred to March 28, or the second day of Easter to make room for Good Friday. In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by most Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in leap years). ...


One unique feature of the ELCA calendar is that it has given congregations the options of two dates for the Transfiguration. Following most other Western Churches, the ELCA moved the Transfiguration from its 6 August date to the Last Sunday after Epiphany (the Sunday immediately preceding Ash Wednesday) as an optional to the traditional Last Sunday after Epiphany in an effort to encourage a wider observance of the Transfiguration within congregations. However, the traditional date of 6 August was left on the calendar. Congregations were given the option of observing Transfiguration on the Last Sunday after the Epiphany and 6 August, thus leaving open the possibility that the Transfiguration could be commemorated twice within a calendar year. August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ...


Lesser Festivals

These are days which are associated with the life of Christ or the apostles and deserve attention in their own right. Lesser Festivals do not have priority over festivals and technically do not have precedence over ordinary Sundays. However, the Lutheran Book of Worship does permit the celebration of a Lesser Festival on Sundays where the normal color of the day would be green (that is, seasons after Epiphany or after Pentecost) or on the Sundays in Christmas. This is abrogated for patronal festivals (that is, the day commemorating the saint or event for which a congregation is named) provided that they do not take place in Lent, Advent, or Easter, in which case they must also be transferred to the next convenient weekday. Most Lesser Festivals have their own collects and a few, such as All Saints have their own proper. This article is about the Christian holiday. ...


Commemorations

Commemorations are for individuals or events which have been noteworthy in the life of the Church and in the history of Lutheranism in particular. These days do not take precedence over any other festival day and if there is a conflict between a commemoration and a festival of any other rank, the commemoration is generally transferred to the next open weekday. If a commemoration falls on a Sunday where the color of the day is green, the collect for which that individual or event belong to could be said before the daily collect/prayer of the day or in place of it. For example, if September 13 fell on a Sunday and there was a desire to commemorate St. John Chrysostom, the pastor would recite the common of theologians and then the prayer of the day or the common of theologians on it own. The person may also be mentioned by name in the prayers of the faithful in addition to recitation of the applicable collect. Finally, their lives might be summarized or their teachings related to the day’s lessons in some way. Mr wadawits smells Luthers seal Lutheranism is a Christian tradition based upon the main theological insights of Martin Luther. ... In Christian liturgy, a collect is a short, general prayer. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... Saint John Chrysostom John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ...


In cases of conflict between commemorations (for example, November 11 with St. Martin of Tours and Søren Kierkegaard), there is no order of precedence and individual worship planners need to choose which commemoration, if any, to highlight. In some cases, several individuals are listed together (June 14 with St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory the Theologian, and St. Gregory of Nyssa) because of their close association with each other and they are thus designed to be commemorated as a unit, not as a choice between one or the other. November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... St Martin as a bishop: modern icon in the chapel of the Eastern Orthodox Monastery of the Theotokos and St Martin, Cantauque, Provence. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: ) (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a 19th-century Danish philosopher and theologian, generally recognized as the first existentialist philosopher. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... Basil (ca. ... An icon of Saint Gregory Nazianzen the theologian holding a Gospel Book Saint Gregory Nazianzen (AD 329 - January 25, 389), also known as Saint Gregory the Theologian, was a 4th century Christian bishop of Constantinople. ... saint Gregory of Nyssa Gregory of Nyssa ( 335 – after 394) was a Christian bishop and saint. ...


The schedule of commemorations within the ELCA has been specifically designed so that there is at least one person on the calendar from each century so as to emphasize the continuity of Christian tradition. Clearly, some centuries are have more commemorations than others, the largest number persons commemorated being in the first four centuries of Christian history and immediately following the Reformation. This leaves the space from the fifth to the fifteen centuries and the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries rather sparse. Nevertheless, it is a vast improvement over some calendars wherein only a very few persons, all from the patristic or reformation periods, were commemorated.


Differences from Other Calendars

The Lutheran calendar is most similar to the calendar of The Episcopal Church and thus to the Anglican Calendar of Saints, though like its close cousin, it bears resemblance to the Roman Calendar of Saints. However, the Lutheran calendar differs from both in two very significant ways, aside from an obviously heavy Lutheran accent. First, the Lutheran calendar, while commemorating many of the same events or persons, often does so on different days from either calendar (St. Cyprian of Carthage on September 16 for Lutherans, but September 15 for Anglicans and for Roman Catholics). In other cases (such as St. Valentine on February 14) individuals who have long standing within Western Christianity are not mentioned in the ELCA calendar, but may be mentioned in the LCMS calendar. In general, like the Anglican counterpart, the ELCA calendar has taken on many of the precedents established by the post-Vatican II reforms of the liturgy in the Roman Catholic Church. The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... Saint Cyprian (Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus) (died September 14, 258) was bishop of Carthage and an important early Christian writer. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... A depiction of St. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, (Vatican two) was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ...


The other significant difference is that the Lutheran calendar commemorates a wider variety of individuals than does either of its counterparts. Included on the calendar are musicians and artists who are associated with the Church, but are not typically thought of as “saints” in the classical sense. The intent is to provide a wider venue for commemoration of outstanding individuals who have served the Church through their vocations rather than simply commemorating the outstanding among the religious.


There is also no use of the title “saint” for anyone other than biblical persons (and even then the title is used with a certain degree of exclusivity). This is to prevent oddities of convention (such as St. Nicholas Copernicus) as well as to underline the Lutheran emphasis on the priesthood of all believers. Nevertheless, individuals who typically have “saint” affixed to their given name are still referred to as such in common discourse (so that St. Francis would still be called “St. Francis” rather than just “Francis”). Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus - February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed a heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ... Saint Francis of Assisi (1182 – 3 October 1226) founded the Franciscan Order or Friars Minor. He is the patron saint of animals, merchants, Italy, Catholic action, and the environment. ...


The previous North American calendar of the ELCA was also different from its European counterparts in that it does not give equal weight (and sometimes no mention) to persons who may be commemorated in Scandinavian regions. One example would be the absence of St. Lucia on December 13 who enjoys particular popularity in Sweden. But, Lutheran calendars also differ amongst one another in North America (though St. Lucia is commemorated by the LCMS on her traditional date); with the 2006 publication of Evangelical Lutheran Worship (ELW) as a replacement to the Lutheran Book of Worship (LBW). The calendar below is primarily based on the one used by the ELCA and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, with supplemental information specific to the LCMS from the 2006 Lutheran Service Book. The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod have different, somewhat minimalized calendars when compared to what is seen here and has not been included. The additions and variations between the ELCA and the LCMS have been noted. Within the ELCA, This Far by Faith and Libro de Liturgia y Cantico both prescribe calendars with additional commemorations specific to the communities for which they were intended to be used (African Americans and Latinos respectively); these commemorations have been included in the calendar below but have not been specifically annotated in any way December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lutheran Book of Worship is a hymnal and prayer book used by several Lutheran denominations in North America. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) (Eglise Evangelique Lutherienne au Canada) is Canadas largest Lutheran denomination, with 182,077 baptized members in 624 congregations. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... WELS Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a United States religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. ...


The calendar for the ELCA is similar to other Western Calendars in that it does not commemorate any persons from the Old Testament. The calendars of the Orthodox Churches to have Old Testament individuals, and the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod has done the same. At one point there was a proposal to include a day on the Episcopal Church calendar for Old Testament saints following the octave of All Saints (November 8), but this idea was ultimately rejected as tokenism. NOTE: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh, but not Old Testament, because it does not recognize the New Testament as a continuation or completion of the Jewish bible. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that encompasses national jurisdictions such as the Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox and other Churches (see Eastern Orthodox Church organization). ... Official cross symbol of the Missouri Synod The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS) is the second-largest Lutheran body in the United States. ... Octave in the liturgical sense is the eighth day following a major feast, particularly in the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican liturgal calendars. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with token character. ...


For calendars besides the Lutheran calendar, see: Calendar of Saints (Anglican), Calendar of Saints (Roman Catholic), and Calendar of Saints (Eastern Orthodox). The provinces of the Anglican Communion commemorate many of the same saints as those in the Roman Catholic calendar, often on the same days, but also commemorate various famous (often post-Reformation and/or English) Christians who have not been canonized. ... // January January 1: Mary, Mother of God - Solemnity January 2: Saints Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen - Memorial January 3: Saint Guinevere and The Feast of the Holy Name - Optional Memorial January 4: Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton - Memorial January 5: Saint Telesphorus and Saint John Neumann - Memorial January 6: Blessed... The Eastern Orthodox Church calendar describes or dictates the rhythm of the life of the Church. ...


The Calendar of Saints

The event commemorated is listed with the type of event afterwards in parenthesis as well as the country where it is observed (if not commonly observed on that date in North America). For individuals, the date given is the date of their death or “heavenly birthday.” The single letter listed after each event is the particular color for vestments, whether White (W), Red (R) or Purple (P). Commemorations are noted as being specific to the ELCA or LCMS following the particular entry. Commemorations and Festivals that are held in common are not annotated. Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ...


January

  • 1 Holy Name of Jesus (Lesser Festival) W
  • 2 Johann Konrad Wilhelm Löhe, pastor, 1872 (Commemoration)
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6 Epiphany of our Lord (Festival) W
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10 Basil the Great, Bishop of Caesarea, 379; Gregory of Nazianzus, Bishop of Constantinople, c. 389; Gregory, Bishop of Nyssa, c. 385 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15 Martin Luther King Jr., renewer of society, martyr, 1968 (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 16
  • 17 Antony of Egypt, renewer of the church, c. 356 (Commemoration) W
    • Pachomius, renewer of the church, 346 (Commemoration) W - ELCA
  • 18 Confession of St. Peter (Lesser Festival) W
  • 19 Henry, Bishop of Uppsala, missionary to Finland, martyr, 1156 (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 20 Sarah, matriarch (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 21 Agnes, martyr (Commemoration) R - ELCA
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24 St. Timothy, pastor (Lesser Festival) W - LCMS
  • 25 Conversion of St. Paul (Lesser Festival) W
    • Week of Prayer for Christian Unity Ends
  • 26 Timothy, Titus, and Silas, missionaries (Commemoration) – ELCA
    • St. Titus, pastor (Lesser Festival) W - LCMS
  • 27 Lydia, Dorcas, and Phoebe (Commemoration) – ELCA
    • John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople, 407 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 28 Thomas Aquinas, teacher, 1274 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

January is the first month of the year and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus is an observance found in the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Johann Konrad Wilhelm Löhe (often rendered Loehe) (February 21, 1808 Fürth near Nuremberg - January 2, 1872), German divine and philanthropist, was born on the 21st of February 1808 in Fürth near Nuremberg. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ as Angels look on in wonder in an Eastern Orthodox icon of the Theophany This article is about the Christian feast. ... Basil (ca. ... Saint Gregory Nazianzus (AD 329 - January 25, 389), also known as Saint Gregory the Theologian, was a 4th century Christian bishop of Constantinople. ... Gregory of Nyssa ( 335 – after 394) was a Christian bishop and saint. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Saint Anthony the Great, Father of all Monks Saint Anthony the Great ( 251 - 356), Christian saint, also known as Saint Anthony of Egypt, Saint Anthony of the Desert, Saint Anthony the Anchorite, and The Father of All Monks was a leader among the Desert Fathers, who were Christian monks in... Pachomius, who died around AD 345 in Tabennisi, Egypt, was one of the founders of Christian monasticism. ... The Chair of Saint Peter (Latin: Cathedra Petri) is a relic enclosed in a gilt bronze casing, designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. ... The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is an international Christian ecumenical observance kept annually between 18 January and 25 January. ... Henry is a male given name and a surname. ... Sara (שָׂרָה a woman of high rank, Standard Hebrew Sara, Tiberian Hebrew Śārāh, Arabic: سارة, Yiddish Shóre) is the wife of Abraham as described in the Hebrew Bible. ... The common name Agnes is derived from the Greek word hagnē, the feminine word for hagnos Agnes is a solitaire card game which is a variant of the very popular game Klondike. ... Timothy (whose Greek name, Τιμοθέῳ, means to fear or to honor God) was a first-century Christian bishop who died about AD 80. ... In the Christian New Testament, Titus, (a common Roman name, meaning honourable) was a companion of Paul of Tarsus, mentioned in several of Pauls Epistles. ... Silas or Silvanus (flourished 1st century) was an early Christian who was a companion of Paul and Peter. ... Lydia of Thyatira was the first recorded convert to Christianity in Europe. ... Dorcas is a female name of Greek origins, (in Aramaic - Tabitha), which means gazelle. ... Phoebe (Christian woman) was mentioned by the Apostle Paul in Romans 16:1 as a deaconess of the early Christian church located in Cenchrea, an eastern port of Corinth. ... Saint John Chrysostom John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas [Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino] (c. ...

February

February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Candlemas (Russian: Sretenie, Spanish: Candelaria) is a Christian feast commemorating the purification of the Virgin Mary and the presentation of the infant Jesus in the Temple. ... Ansgar, etching by Hugo Hamilton (1830) Ansgar, Anskar or Oscar, (September 8?, 801–February 3, 865) was an Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen. ... The Martyrs of Japan refers to a group of Christians who were executed by crucifixion in 1597 at Nagasaki. ... It has been suggested that Yaqub be merged into this article or section. ... Silas or Silvanus (flourished 1st century) was an early Christian who was a companion of Paul and Peter. ... Aquila (Gk. ... Prisca, also known as Priscilla, was one of the earliest evangelists of Jesus Christ. ... Apollos (Απολλως; contracted from Apollonius) was an early Christian, who is mentioned several times in the New Testament. ... Saint Cyril (Greek: Κύριλλος, Church Slavonic: Кирилъ) (827 - February 14, 869) was a Greek (i. ... Saint Methodius (Greek: Μεθόδιος; Church Slavonic Мефодии) (b. ... A depiction of St. ... Philemon was a citizen of Colossae in Phrygia in the 1st century, to whom Paul of Tarsus addressed a private letter, unique in the New Testament, which bears his name, the Epistle to Philemon. ... Onesimus In the New Testament, Onesimus (d. ... Melancthon, in a portrait engraved by Albrecht Dürer, 1526 Philipp Melanchthon (February 16, 1497 - April 19, 1560) was a German theologian and writer of the Protestant Reformation and an associate of Martin Luther. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Rasmus Jensen is a Danish Lutheran priest and the first Lutheran cleric in the New World. ... Polycarp of Smyrna (martyred in his 87th year, ca. ... Saint Matthias is the Apostle chosen by the remaining eleven apostles to replace Judas Iscariot, following Judas betrayal of Jesus and suicide (Acts 1:21 - 26). ... Elizabeth Fedde was born on December 25, 1850 near Flekkefjord, Norway. ...

March

March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... Among Christians, Vibia Perpetua is venerated as a martyr and saint. ... Harriet Tubman in 1880 Harriet Tubman (c. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Saint Gregory I, or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (circa 540 - March 12, 604) was pope of the Catholic Church from September 3, 590 until his death. ... Saint Patrick Saint Patrick (386–March 17, 493, see below) was a missionary and is regarded as the patron saint of Ireland (along with Saint Brigid and Saint Columba). ... Joseph led his family to safety in Egypt to escape from Herod, as depicted by Lorenzo Monaco According to the Christian Gospel accounts Joseph of the House of David – in tradition also called Joseph the Betrothed and Saint Joseph – was the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:16) and the legal... An oil painting of Thomas Cranmer by Gerlach Flicke (1545) - National Portrait Gallery, London Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books... Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703- March 22, 1758) was a colonial American Congregational preacher and theologian. ... Óscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdámez (August 15, 1917 – March 24, 1980), commonly known as Monseñor Romero, was a priest of the Roman Catholic Church in El Salvador. ... A key piece of the Paleologan Mannerism - the Annunciation icon from Ohrid. ... Hans Nielsen Hauge (1771-1824) was a revivalist Norwegian lay preacher who spoke up against the Church establishment in Norway. ... John Donne John Donne (pronounced Dun; 1572 – March 31, 1631) was a Jacobean poet and preacher, the representative of the so-called metaphysical poets of the period, though the term itself came after his death. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

April

For other uses, see April (disambiguation). ... St. ... Self-Portrait, 1493, Oil on Canvas Albrecht Dürer (May 21, 1471 - April 6, 1528) was a German painter, wood carver and engraver. ... Michelangelo (full name Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni) (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564) was a Renaissance sculptor, architect, painter, and poet. ... Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553) Lucas Cranach the Younger (1515-1586) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dietrich Bonhoeffer Dietrich Bonhoeffer (February 4, 1906 – April 9, 1945) was a German Lutheran pastor, theologian and participant in the German resistance movement against Nazism. ... Mikael Agricola Mikael Agricola (c. ... Petri outside Storkyrkan, Stockholm Olof Persson (sometimes Petersson; born January 6, 1493 in Örebro, died April 19, 1552 in Stockholm), better known under the Latin form of his name, Olaus Petri, was a clergyman, writer and a main character of the Protestant reformation in Sweden. ... Laurentius Petri Nericus (Örebro 1499 – October 27, 1573), originally Lars Persson, was a Swedish clergyman and the first Evangelical Lutheran Archbishop of Sweden. ... Johannes Bugenhagen (24 June 1485 in Wollin, Pomerania—20 April 1558 in Wittenberg, Saxony), also called Doktor Pomeranus, introduced the Protestant Reformation in Pomerania and Denmark in the 16th century. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 - April 21, 1109), a widely influential medieval philosopher and theologian, held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Toyohiko Kagawa (賀川豊彦 Kagawa Toyohiko, 10 July 1888–23 April 1960) was a Japanese pacifist, Christian reformer, and labour activist. ... Johann Walter is a Lutheran musician during the Reformation period. ... Mark the Evangelist (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter. ... St. ...

May

  • 1 St. Philip and St. James, Apostles (Lesser Festival) R
  • 2 Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria, 373 (Commemoration) W
  • 3
  • 4 Monica, mother of Augustine, 387 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 5 Frederick the Wise, Christian ruler, 1525 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 6
  • 7 Carl F. W. Walther, pastor, theologian, 1887 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 8 Victor the Moor, martyr, 303 (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 9 Nicolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, renewer of the church, hymnwriter, 1760 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Job, patriarch (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 10
  • 11 Cyril 869 and Methodius 885, missionaries to the Slavs (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14 St. Matthias, apostle (Lesser Festival) R – ELCA
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18 Erik, King of Sweden, martyr, 1160 (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 19 Helena, mother of Constantine, c. 330 (Commemoration) W - ELCA
  • 20
  • 21 Emperor Constantine, Emperor of Rome, 337 and Helena, mother of Constantine (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 22
  • 23 Ludwig Ingwer Nommensen, missionary to Sumatra, 1918 (Commemoration) W
  • 24 Nicolaus Copernicus, 1543; Leonhard Euler, 1783; teachers (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Esther, matriarch, (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 25 Bede, theologian, 735 (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 26
  • 27 John Calvin, renewer of the church, 1564 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 28
  • 29 Juraj Tranovský, hymnwriter, 1637 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 30
  • 31 The Visitation (Lesser Festival) W

Look up May in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Saint Philip. ... For people and places called Saint James, see the diambiguation page. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (also spelled Athanasios) was a Christian bishop of Alexandria in the fourth century. ... Saint Monica of Hippo (333 - 387) is a Christian saint and mother of Saint Augustine. ... Friedrich Conrad Dietrich Wyneken (May 13, 1810 – May 4, 1876) was a missionary, pastor and the second president of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. ... Frederick in an engraved portrait by Albrecht Dürer, 1524 Frederick III (January 17, 1463 – May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death. ... Carl Ferdinand Wilhelm (C.F.W.) Walther (October 25, 1811 - May 17, 1887), was the first President of the Lutheran Church _ Missouri Synod. ... Saint Victor Maurus, also called Victor the Moor (born 3rd century in Mauretania; died ca. ... Julian of Norwich (c. ... Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, Count of Zinzendorf and Pottendorf, (May 26, 1700 – May 9, 1760), German religious and social reformer, was born at Dresden. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... Matthias can refer to: Saint Matthias Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor Matthias Corvinus This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Coat of Arms of Stockholm, depicting Eric IX of Sweden Eric IX of Sweden (or Erik the Lawgiver or Eric the Saint. ... st Helena was a great gal she was really great ... Constantine. ... st Helena was a great gal she was really great ... Ludwig Ingwer Nommensen was born in 1834 in Schleswig-Holstein (a district long disputed between Denmark and Germany, and at that time Danish). ... Nicolaus Copernicus (February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was an astronomer who provided the first modern formulation of a heliocentric (sun-centered) theory of the solar system in his epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres). ... 1937 portrait of Leonhard Euler by Johann Georg Brucker. ... Haddassah, more commonly known as Esther (אֶסְתֵּר, Standard Hebrew Ester, Tiberian Hebrew ʾEstÄ“r) was a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (commonly identified with Xerxes I or Artaxerxes II), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. ... Bede depicted in an early medieval manuscript Depiction of Bede from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... TÅ™anovskýs exlibris Jiří TÅ™anovský (or Tranovský, Trzanowski) was born April 9, 1592 in Teschen. ... The Visitation is a Catholic feast day (2 July) commemorating the visit of the Virgin Mary to Elizabeth as recorded in the Gospel of Luke. ...

June

  • 1 Justin, martyr at Rome, c. 165 (Commemoration) R
  • 2
  • 3 John XXIII, Bishop of Rome, 1963 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 4
  • 5 Boniface, Archbishop of Mainz, missionary to Germany, martyr, 754 (Commemoration) R
  • 6
  • 7 Seattle, chief of the Duwamish Confederacy, 1866 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 8
  • 9 Columba, 597; Aidan, 651; Bede, 735; teachers (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 10
  • 11 St. Barnabas, Apostle (Lesser Festival) R
  • 12 First Ecumenical Council, 325 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 13
  • 14 Basil the Great, Bishop of Caesarea, 379; Gregory of Nazianzus, Bishop of Constantinople, c. 389; Gregory, Bishop of Nyssa, c. 385 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Macrina, theologian, c. 379 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Elisha, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21 Onesimos Nesib, translator, evangelist, 1931 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24 The Nativity of St. John the Baptist (Lesser Festival) W
  • 25 Presentation of the Augsburg Confession, 1530 (Lesser Festival) W
  • 26 Jeremiah, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 27 Cyril, Bishop of Alexandria, 444 ( Commemoration) R
  • 28 Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons, c. 202 (Commemoration) W
  • 29 St. Peter and St. Paul, Apostles (Lesser Festival) R
  • 30

June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with a length of 30 days. ... Justin Martyr (Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea) (100 – 165) was an early Christian apologist. ... The Blessed John XXIII wearing a Papal Tiara Angelo Roncalli was born in Sotto il Monte (province of Bergamo), Italy on November 25, 1881. ... The Martyrs of Uganda are a group of Roman Catholics and Protestants killed by Mwanga, ruler of Buganda. ... For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ... Chief Seattle Chief Seattle (also Sealth, Seathl or See-ahth) (c. ... Saint Columba (7 December 521 - 9 June 597) is sometimes referred to as Columba of Iona, or, in Old Irish, as Saint Colm Cille or Columcille (meaning Dove of the church). He was the outstanding figure among the Gaelic missionary monks who reintroduced Christianity to Scotland during the Dark Ages. ... Saint Aidan of Lindisfarne, the Apostle of Northumbria (?-651), is the founder and first bishop of the monastery on the island of Lindisfarne in England. ... Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... The First Council of Nicaea, which took place during the reign of the emperor Constantine in 325, was the first ecumenical (from Greek oikumene, worldwide) conference of bishops of the Christian Church. ... tHE TOILET IS oUT OF OrfING ... Elisha (אֱלִישַׁע My God is salvation, Standard Hebrew EliÅ¡aÊ¿, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîšaÊ¿) was the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah; he became the attendant and disciple of Elijah (1 Kings 19:16-19). ... Onesimos Nesib (about 1856 - 21 June 1931), was a native Oromo who converted to Lutheran Christianity and translated the Christian Bible into Oromo. ... The Nativity of St. ... The Augsburg Confession, in Latin Confessio Augustana, is the central document of the Lutheran reformation, which was a reaction against the Roman Catholic Church. ... Melancthon, in a portrait engraved by Albrecht Dürer, 1526 Philipp Melanchthon (February 16, 1497 - April 19, 1560) was a German theologian and writer of the Protestant Reformation and an associate of Martin Luther. ... Jeremiah Lamenting the Destruction of Jerusalem by Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn. ... St. ... An engraving of Saint Irenaeus (ca. ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose from among his original disciples. ... Paul of Tarsus, also known as Paul the Apostle or Saint Paul (AD 3–14 — 62–69),[1] is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Jerusalem. ...

July

Look up July in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Catherine Winkworth (September 13, 1827 _ July 1, 1878) was an English translator best known for bringing the German chorale tradition to many English speakers with her translations of many hymns. ... John Mason Neale (January 24, 1818 - August 6, 1866), English divine and scholar, was born in London, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Thomas was not a Biblical given name, but originated from the Aramaic designation תום or Tôm. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Saint Benedict of Nursia (c. ... Lars Olof Jonathan Söderblom, better known as Nathan Söderblom (January 15, 1866 - July 12, 1931), was a Swedish clergyman, and later Archbishop of the Church of Sweden and laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... The Book of Ruth is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh/Hebrew Bible and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... Bartolomé de Las Casas Bartolomé de Las Casas, O.P. (1484 – July 17, 1566) was a 16th century Spanish priest, and the first resident Bishop of Chiapas. ... Elijah (אֱלִיָּהוּ Whose/my God is the Lord, Standard Hebrew Eliyyáhu, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔliyyāhû), also Elias (NT Greek Ἠλίας), is a prophet of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ... Saint Birgitta, also known as St. ... Saint James the Great (d. ... Bach redirects here. ... Heinrich Schütz Heinrich Schütz (October 9, 1585 – November 6, 1672) was a German composer and organist, generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach and is often considered to be one of the most important composers of the 17th century along with Claudio Monteverdi. ... George Frideric Handel (German Georg Friedrich Händel), (February 23, 1685 – April 14, 1759) was a German-born British Baroque music composer. ... Mary anoints Jesus in Bethany in this icon. ... For other uses, see Martha (disambiguation). ... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500. ... Olaf II Haraldsson (995 – July 29, 1030), king from 1015–1028, (known during his lifetime as the Stout and after his canonization as Saint Olaf), was born in the year in which Olaf Tryggvasson came to Norway. ... Joseph of Arimathea, according to the Gospels, was the man who donated his own prepared tomb for the burial of Jesus after his crucifixion. ...

August

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3 Joanna, Mary, and Salome, myrrh-bearing women (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6 Transfiguration of Our Lord (Festival) W
  • 7
  • 8 Dominic, priest, founder of the Order of Preachers 1221 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 9
  • 10 Lawrence, deacon, martyr 258 (Commemoration) R
  • 11
  • 12 Claire, renewer of the Church, 1253 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 13 Florence Nightingale, 1910; Clara Maass, 1901; renewers of society (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 14 Maximilian Kolbe, 1941; Kaj Munk, 1944, martyrs (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 15 Mary, Mother of Our Lord (Lesser Festival) W
  • 16 Isaac, patriarch (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 17 Johann Gerhard, theologian, 1637 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 18
  • 19 Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux, hymnwriter, theologian 1153 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 20 Bernard, Abbot of Clairvaux, hymnwriter, theologian 1153 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Samuel, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24 St. Bartholomew, Apostle (Lesser Festival) R
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27 Monica, mother of Augustine 387 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 28 Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, 430 (Commemoration) W
  • 29 The Martyrdom of Saint John the Baptist (Lesser Festival) R – LCMS
  • 30
  • 31

August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Joanna was one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazareth, often considered to be one of the disciples. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... St. ... For other uses, see Saint Lawrence (disambiguation). ... Saint Clare of Assisi, born Chiara Offreduccio, (July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253) was one of the first followers of Francis of Assisi and founded the Order of Poor Ladies to organize the women who chose to take the Franciscan vow of poverty and celibacy. ... Florence Nightingale, OM (12 May 1820 – 13 August 1910), who came to be known as The Lady with the Lamp, was a pioneer of modern nursing. ... Clara Louise Maass (June 28, 1876—August 24, 1901) was an American nurse who died as a result of volunteering for experiments to study yellow fever. ... Maximilian Kolbe (January 8, 1894–August 14, 1941), also known as Maksymilian or Massimiliano Maria Kolbe and Apostle of Consecration to Mary, born as Rajmund Kolbe, was a Polish Franciscan friar who volunteered to die in place of a stranger in the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz in Poland. ... Kaj Harald Leininger Munk (commonly called Kaj Munk) (January 13, 1898 - January 4, 1944) was a Danish playwright and Lutheran pastor, known for his cultural engagement and his martyrdom during World War II. He was born Kaj Harald Leininger Petersen at Lolland, Denmark, and raised by a family called Munk... According to the New Testament, Mary (Judeo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Arabic مريم (Maryam); Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Geez: ማሪያም, Māryām; Syriac: Mart, Maryam, Madonna), was the mother of Jesus of Nazareth, who at the time of his conception was the betrothed wife of Saint Joseph (cf. ... It has been suggested that Ishaq be merged into this article or section. ... Johann Gerhard (October 17, 1582 - August 10, 1637), was a Lutheran church leader. ... Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (Fontaines, near Dijon, 1090 – August 21, 1153 in Clairvaux) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian monastic order. ... This article is about the Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. ... Michelangelos The Last Judgement shows Saint Bartholomew holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. ... For the first Archbishop of Canterbury, see Saint Augustine of Canterbury Aurelius Augustinus, Augustine of Hippo, or Saint Augustine (November 13, 354 – August 28, 430) was one of the most important figures in the development of Western Christianity. ... St. ...

September

  • 1 Joshua, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 2 Nikolaj Frederik Severin Grundtvig, bishop, renewer of the church, 1872 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
    • Hannah, matriarch (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 3 Gregory the Great, Bishop of Rome, 604 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 4 Moses, prophet (Commemoration)) R – LCMS
  • 5 Zechariah, prophet, and Elizabeth, matriarch (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9 Peter Claver, priest, missionary to Colombia, 1654 (Commemoration) – ELCA
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13 John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople, 407 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 14 Holy Cross Day (Lesser Festival) R
  • 15
  • 16 Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, martyr, c. 258 (Commemoration) R
  • 17
  • 18 Dag Hammarskjöld, peacemaker, 1961 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 19
  • 20 Nelson Wesley Trout, bishop, 1996 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 21 St. Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist (Lesser Festival) R
  • 22 Jonah, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29 St. Michael and All Angels (Lesser Festival) W
  • 30 Jerome, translator, teacher, 420 (Commemoration) W

Look up September in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Joshua or Yehoshúa (יְהוֹשֻׁעַ Yeho/YHVH is help/saves/delivers, Standard Hebrew YÉ™hošúaÊ¿, Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™hôšuªʿ) is a Biblical character, much of whose life is described in the Book of Joshua. ... Nikolaj Frederik Severin Grundtvig (September 8, 1783, Udby, Sjælland, Denmark, –September 2, 1872, Copenhagen) was a Danish teacher , writer, poet, philosopher, historian, minister, and even politician. ... Hannah (or Chana) (Hebrew: ×—× ×” - Grace [of God]) was a wife of Elkanah and the mother of the prophet Samuel as recorded in the Book of Samuel. ... Moses strikes water from the stone, by Bacchiacca Moses or Moshe (Hebrew: מֹשֶׁ, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: موسى, ; Geez: ሙሴ Musse) is a legendary Hebrew liberator, leader, lawgiver, prophet, and historian. ... For the priest Zechariah of Luke 1:5 see the article Zacharias. ... Elizabeth, also spelled Elisabeth (Hebrew אֱלִישֶׁבַע / אֱלִישָׁבַע My God is oath, Standard Hebrew ElišévaÊ¿ / ElišávaÊ¿, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîšéḇaÊ¿ / ʾĔlîšāḇaÊ¿) was the mother of John the Baptist, according to the New Testament. ... Saint Peter Claver (in Spanish: Pedro Claver) (1581 — 8 September 1654) was a Jesuit who, due to his remarkable life and work, become the patron saint of slaves, of Colombia and of African Americans. ... In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... Saint Cyprian (Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus) (died September 14, 258) was bishop of Carthage and an important early Christian writer. ... Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Nelson Wesley Trout (1921-1976) was the first U.S. Lutheran African American bishop in the ELCA. Trout was born in Columbus, Ohio, USA. Trout was elected bishop of the South Pacific District of the American Lutheran Church (ALC) in 1983, a position he served through 1987. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew Mattay; Septuagint Greek Μαθθαιος, Matthaios) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Matthew. ... The Prophet Jonah, as depicted by Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel Jonah (יוֹנָה Dove, Standard Hebrew Yona, Latin Ionas, Tiberian Hebrew, and Arabic يونس Yunus or Yunis in Islamic Quraanic terms) was a person in the Biblical Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, the son of Amittai (True), from the Galilean village... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a town in Quebec, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. ...

October

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4 Francis of Assisi, renewer of the church, 1226 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 5
  • 6 William Tyndale, translator, martyr, 1536 (Commemoration) R – ELCA
  • 7 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, missionary to America, 1787 (Commemoration) W
  • 8
  • 9 Abraham, patriarch (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 10
  • 11 St. Phillip, deacon (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14 Day of Thanksgiving (Canada) W – ELCA
    • Massie L. Kennard, renewer of the church, 1996 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 15 Teresa of Ávila, teacher, renewer of the church, 1582 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 16
  • 17 Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch, martyr, c. 115 (Commemoration) R
  • 18 St. Luke, Evangelist (Lesser Festival) R
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23 James of Jerusalem,brother of Jesus and martyr, c. 62 (Lesser Festival) R
  • 24
  • 25 Lydia, Dorcas (Tabitha), and Phoebe, faithful women (Commemoration) – LCMS
  • 26 Philipp Nicolai, 1608; Johann Heermann, 1647; Paul Gerhardt, 1676; hymnwriters (Commemoration) W
  • 27
  • 28 St. Simon and St. Jude, Apostles (Lesser Festival) R
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31 Reformation Day (Lesser Festival) R

Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Saint Francis of Assisi (1182 – 3 October 1226) founded the Franciscan Order or Friars Minor. He is the patron saint of animals, merchants, Italy, Catholic action, and the environment. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... It has been suggested that The Tyndale Society be merged into this article or section. ... Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (September 6, 1711, Einbeck, Germany – October 7, 1787) Trappe, Pennsylvania, originally Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was a Lutheran clergyman who is viewed as the founder of the Lutheran Church in the United States. ... Tomb of Abraham Abraham (between 2000 BC/BCE and 1500 BC/BCE) (Hebrew: אברהם, Standard Avraham Ashkenazi Avrohom or Avruhom Tiberian  ; Arabic: ابراهيم,  ; Geez: አብርሃም,  ; Father/Leader of many) is regarded as the founding patriarch of the Israelites whom God chose to bless and be a blessing to all the families of... Philip the Evangelist appears several times in the Acts of the Apostles but should not be confused with Philip the Apostle. ... // Headline text For other people known as Saint Teresa, see Teresa Teresa of Avila by Peter Paul Rubens Saint Teresa of Avila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptised as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) was a Spanish Roman Catholic mystic and monastic reformer; born at Avila (53... Icon of Ignatius being eaten by lions St. ... Luke was, according to tradition, the painter of the first icon Luke the Evangelist (Greek Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... Saint James the Just (יעקב Holder of the heel; supplanter; Standard Hebrew YaÊ¿aqov, Tiberian Hebrew Yaʿăqōḇ), also called James Adelphos, James of Jerusalem, or the Brother of the Lord and sometimes identified with James the Lesser, (died AD 62) was an important figure in Early Christianity. ... Philipp Nicolai was a German Lutheran pastor and poet (1566-1608), author of two famous hymns: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme and Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern. ... Paul Gerhardt (c. ... The apostle Simon, called Simon the Zealot in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13; and Simon Kananaios (Simon signifying שמעון hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ), was one of the most obscure among the apostles of Jesus; little is recorded of him aside from his name. ... Saint Jude is a Christian saint and one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... Reformation Day is a minor festival celebrated in remembrance of the Reformation, particularly by Lutheran and Reformed church communities. ...

November

  • 1 All Saints Day (Festival) W
  • 2
  • 3 Martín de Porres, renewer of society 1639 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7 John Christian Frederick Heyer, 1873; Bartholomaeus Ziegenbalg, 1719; [[Ludwig

Nommensen]], 1918, missionaries (Commemoration) W – ELCA Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Christian holiday. ... St. ... Bartholomaeus Ziegenbalg monument in Tranquebar, Tamil Nadu, South India Bartholomaeus Ziegenbalg (June 10, 1682 - February 23, 1719) was a member of the Lutheran clergy and a missionary to India. ...

  • 8 Johann von Staupitz, priest 1524 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 9 Martin Chemnitz, teacher, 1586 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 10
  • 11 Martin, Bishop of Tours, 397 (Commemoration) W
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14 Emperor Justinian, confessor, 565 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17 Elizabeth, Princess of Hungary, 1231 (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 18
  • 19 Elisabeth, Princess of Hungary, 1231 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23 Clement, Bishop of Rome, c. 100 (Commemoration) W
  • 24 Justus Falckner, 1723; Jehu Jones, 1852, William Passavant, 1894, priests (Commemoration) W – ELCA
  • 25 Isaac Watts, hymnwriter, 1748 (Commemoration) W – LCMS
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29 Noah, prophet (Commemoration) R – LCMS
  • 30 St. Andrew, Apostle (Lesser Festival) R

Engraving of Johann Von Staupitz, 1889 Johann Von Staupitz (1460 - December 28, 1524) was a Catholic monk in the Augustinian Order who supervised Martin Luther during a critical period in that mans spiritual life. ... Martin Chemnitz (1522-1586) was an eminent Lutheran theologian, churchman, and confessor, born in Treuenbrietzen, Brandenburg on November 9, 1522, the day before Martin Luther had been born in 1483. ... St Martin as a bishop: modern icon in the chapel of the Eastern Orthodox Monastery of the Theotokos and St Martin, Cantauque, Provence. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: ) (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a 19th-century Danish philosopher and theologian, generally recognized as the first existentialist philosopher. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... Infobox St. ... Saint Clement I, the bishop of Rome also called Clement of Rome and Clemens Romanus, was either the third or fourth pope, before or after Anacletus. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Isaac Watts. ... Noahs Ark, Französischer Meister (The French Master), Magyar Szépmüvészeti Múzeum, Budapest. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Ανδρέας Andreas, manly), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter. ...

December

Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John of Damascus (Latin: Iohannes Damascenus or Johannes Damascenus also known as John Damascene, Chrysorrhoas, streaming with gold—i. ... Saint Nicholas is the common name for Saint Nicholas of Myra, who had a reputation for secret gift-giving. ... For other people and things named Ambrose, see Ambrose (disambiguation) Saint Ambrose, (Latin: Sanctus Ambrosius; Italian: SantAmbrogio) (c. ... Saint Lucy, by Domenico Beccafumi, 1521, is a High Renaissance recasting of a Gothic iconic image (Pinacoteca Nazionale, Siena) Saint Lucy of Syracuse, also known as Saint Lucia, (traditional dates 283-304) was a rich young Christian martyr who is venerated as a Saint by Catholic and Orthodox Christians. ... Saint John of the Cross (Juan de la Cruz) (June 24, 1542 – December 14, 1591) was a major figure in the Catholic Reformation, a Spanish mystic and Carmelite friar born at Fontiveros, a small village near Ávila. ... Posadas is a nine-day holiday beginning December 16 and ending December 24. ... Daniel (Hebrew: דָּנִיֵּאל; transliterated as Daniyyel in Standard Hebrew and Dāniyyêl in Tiberian Hebrew) is the name of at least three people from the Hebrew Bible: A Jewish exile in Babylon, the subject of the Book of Daniel and the most well-known of the three Daniels. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Adam and Eve. ... Portrait of Katharina von Bora, wife of Martin Luther, by Lucas Cranach the Elder. ... Thomas was one of the 12 apostles of Jesus. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, December 24, the day before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas festivities. ... Christmas is a Christian holiday held on December 25 which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Saint Stephen, Protomartyr, depicted by Carlo Crivelli in 1476 with three stones and the martyrs palm. ... John the Apostle (יוחנן The LORD is merciful, Standard Hebrew Yoḥanan, Tiberian Hebrew Yôḥānān) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... David and Goliath by Caravaggio, c. ...

References

  • Inter-Lutheran Commission on Worship. Lutheran Book of Worship. Augsburg Fortress Press, 1978.
  • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Evangelical Lutheran Worship - Final Draft. Augsburg Fortress Press, 2006. Available at [1]
  • Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. Lutheran Worship. Concordia Publishing House, 1982.
  • Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. Lutheran Service Book. Concordia Publishing House, 2006.

1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Concordia Publishing House is the official publisher for the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Concordia Publishing House is the official publisher for the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also


 
 

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