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Encyclopedia > Caleb Strong
Caleb Strong
Caleb Strong

In office
May 30, 1800 – May 29, 1807
June 1812May 30, 1816
Lieutenant(s) Samuel Phillips, Jr. (1801-1802)
Edward H. Robbins (1802-1806)
William Phillips, Jr. (1812-1816)
Preceded by Governor's Council (1800)
Elbridge Gerry (1812)
Succeeded by James Sullivan (1807)
John Brooks (1816)

United States Junior Senator
In office
1789 – 1796
Preceded by None
Succeeded by Theodore Sedgwick

Born January 9, 1745
Died November 7, 1819
Northampton, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist/Pro-Administration

Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. Born in 1745 in Northampton, Massachusetts, he was a delegate to the Continental Congress from Massachusetts in 1780. He also served as the governor of Massachusetts between 1800 and 1807, and again from 1812 until 1816. Image File history File links Caleb_strong. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with a length of 30 days. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The founder of Phillips Andover Academy, his uncle was Dr. John Phillips who founded Phillips Exeter Academy. ... Edward Hutchinson Robbins (February 9, 1758 - December 17, 1837) served as the lieutendant governor of Massachusetts from 1802 to 1806. ... William Phillips Jr was born in Boston, Massachusetts, April 10, 1750; died in Boston, May 26, 1827. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced , rhymes with merry) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Jeffersonian Republican Party. ... For the Olympic athlete, see James P. Sullivan. ... John Brooks, Jr. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...   Northampton is a city in Hampshire County, Massachusetts in the USA. The population was 28,978 at the 2000 census. ... The Federalist Party was a United States political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ...   Northampton is a city in Hampshire County, Massachusetts in the USA. The population was 28,978 at the 2000 census. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


Strong was elected as a delegate to the Philadelphia Convention that drafted the U.S. Constitution. Illness forced him to return to Massachusetts before the work was completed, so he did not sign the document. However, he supported its adoption by the state's ratifying convention. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Governor Strong opposed the War of 1812 to the point of refusing to call out the State militia to support the war. A strong Federalist, he nonetheless adhered to the States rights view that only the Governor had to power to call out the state militia, not the U.S. President. This stance, combined with a shortage of volunteer soldiers, forced Andrew Jackson and commander Oliver Hazard Perry to allow colored men into the ranks of the Federal army. Combatants United States Native Americans Great Britain, Canadian provincial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson Sir Isaac Brock† George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates... The term federalist refers to a pooponent of one of several different ideologies, depending on the locale or subject matter. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... This article is 45 kilobytes or more in size. ... Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (August 23, 1785 – August 23, 1819) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe Black people, but also included Asian (brown)/(yellow), Chicano (bronze or brown), and Native American (red). ...


Strong died in 1819 in Northampton, Massachusetts, and is buried at the Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton, Massachusetts.   Northampton is a city in Hampshire County, Massachusetts in the USA. The population was 28,978 at the 2000 census. ...   Northampton is a city in Hampshire County, Massachusetts in the USA. The population was 28,978 at the 2000 census. ...


In World War II the United States liberty ship SS Caleb Strong was named in his honor. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ...


External Link

  • Official Commonwealth of Massachusetts Governor Biography
Political offices
Preceded by
(none)
United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
March 4, 1789March 3, 1795
Served alongside: Tristram Dalton, George Cabot
Succeeded by
Theodore Sedgwick
Preceded by
Governor's Council
(as Acting Governor)
Governor of Massachusetts
May 30, 1800May 29, 1807
Succeeded by
James Sullivan
Preceded by
Elbridge Gerry
Governor of Massachusetts
June, 1812May 30, 1816
Succeeded by
John Brooks
Flag of the Governor of Massachusetts Governors of Massachusetts
 Colony 

EndecottWinthropT. DudleyHaynes • Vane • WinthropT. DudleyBellinghamWinthropEndecottT. DudleyWinthropEndecottT. DudleyEndecottBellinghamEndecottBellinghamLeverettBradstreet Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Tristram Dalton (May 28, 1738-May 30, 1817) was an American politician who served as Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Cabot (December 3, 1752-April 18, 1823), a Delegate and a Senator from Massachusetts, and the Presiding Officer of the Hartford Convention, was born in Salem, Massachusetts. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (150th in leap years). ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the Olympic athlete, see James P. Sullivan. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced , rhymes with merry) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Jeffersonian Republican Party. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... John Brooks, Jr. ... Image File history File links Massachusetts_governors_flag. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Gov. ... Sir Henry Vane (1613 - June 14, 1662), son of Henry Vane the Elder, served as a statesman and Member of Parliament in a career spanning England and Massachusetts. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... John Endicott (c. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... John Endicott (c. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Leverett (1616 - March 16, 1679) was a colonial magistrate, merchant, soldier and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony John Leverett was born, perhaps, in Boston, England. ... Simon Bradstreet (March 18, 1603–March 27, 1697) was a colonial magistrate, businessman and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ...

 Dominion 

J. DudleyAndrosBradstreet The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Sir Edmund Andros Sir Edmund Andros (December 6, 1637 - February 24, 1714), was an early colonial governor in North America, and head of the short-lived Dominion of New England. ... Simon Bradstreet (March 18, 1603–March 27, 1697) was a colonial magistrate, businessman and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ...

 Province 

W. PhipsStoughtonCooteStoughtonGovernor's CouncilJ. DudleyGovernor's CouncilJ. DudleyTailerShuteDummerBurnetDummerTailerBelcherShirleyS. PhipsShirleyS. PhipsGovernor's CouncilPownallHutchinsonBernardHutchinsonGage The Province of Massachusetts Bay was a crown colony organized October 7, 1691 in North America by the monarch of England. ... Sir William Phips (1651-1695) Sir William Phips (or Phipps) (February 2, 1651 or 1650 – February 18, 1694 or 1695), colonial governor of Massachusetts, was born at Woolwich, Maine, near the mouth of the Kennebec River. ... William Stoughton (30 September 1631 – 7 July 1701) acted as judge and prosecutor during the Salem Witch Trials. ... Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont, (1636–5 March 1701) was colonial governor of New York from 1698 to 1701 and of Massachusetts from 1699 to 1700. ... William Stoughton (30 September 1631 – 7 July 1701) acted as judge and prosecutor during the Salem Witch Trials. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... William Tailer (1676 - March 8, 1732) was the son of Bostonian William Tailer and a Colonial-era politician. ... Samuel Shute (January 12, 1662 - April 15, 1742) was born in London. ... William Dummer was born in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1677, and died there on October 10, 1761. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into William Burnet (1688-1728). ... William Dummer was born in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1677, and died there on October 10, 1761. ... William Tailer (1676 - March 8, 1732) was the son of Bostonian William Tailer and a Colonial-era politician. ... Jonathan Belcher (1682-1757) was colonial governor of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Jersey. ... William Shirley (1694-1771) William Shirley (1694-1771) was the British governor of Massachusetts from 1741 to 1759. ... Spencer Phips (1685–April, 1757) took office twice as acting Governor of Massachusetts in the absence of William Shirley. ... William Shirley (1694-1771) William Shirley (1694-1771) was the British governor of Massachusetts from 1741 to 1759. ... Spencer Phips (1685–April, 1757) took office twice as acting Governor of Massachusetts in the absence of William Shirley. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Thomas Pownall (1722 - February 25, 1805), British colonial statesman and soldier, was born at Saltfleetby, Lincolnshire, England. ... Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711-June 3, 1780) was the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War. ... Sir Francis Bernard (1712-1779) was a British colonial administrator who served as Governor in New Jersey and Massachusetts. ... Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711-June 3, 1780) was the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War. ... Engraving of Thomas Gage Sir Thomas Gage (1719 – April 2, 1787) was a British general and commander in chief of the North American forces from 1763 to 1775 during the early days of the American Revolution. ...

 Commonwealth 

HancockCushingBowdoinHancockAdamsSumnerGillGovernor's CouncilStrongSullivanLincoln, Sr.GoreGerryStrongBrooksEustisMortonLincoln, Jr.DavisArmstrongEverettMortonDavisMortonBriggsBoutwellCliffordWashburnGardner • Banks • AndrewBullockClaflinWashburnTalbotGastonRiceTalbotLongButlerRobinsonAmesBrackettRussellGreenhalgeWolcottCraneBatesDouglasGuildDraperFossWalshMcCallCoolidgeCoxFullerAllenElyCurleyHurleySaltonstallTobinBradfordDeverHerterFurcoloVolpePeabodyVolpeSargentDukakisKingDukakisWeldCellucciSwiftRomney State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... James Bowdoin (August 7, 1726 – November 6, 1790) was an American political and intellectual leader from Boston, Massachusetts during the American Revolution. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Samuel Adams (September 27, 1722 – October 2, 1803) was the chief Massachusetts leader of the Patriot cause leading to the American Revolution. ... Increase Sumner (November 27, 1746 – June 7, 1799) was a U.S. political figure. ... Moses Gill (1746 - May 20, 1800) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... For the Olympic athlete, see James P. Sullivan. ... Levi Lincoln, Sr. ... Christopher Gore (September 21, 1758 - March 1, 1827) was a prominent Massachusetts lawyer, Federalist politician, and diplomat. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced , rhymes with merry) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Jeffersonian Republican Party. ... John Brooks, Jr. ... William Eustis (June 10, 1753–February 6, 1825) was an early American statesman. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... Levi Lincoln, Jr. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Samuel Turell Armstrong (1784 - 1850) was a U.S. political figure. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... George N. Briggs was a member of the Whig Party and seven-term Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, from 1844 to 1851. ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... John H. Clifford was Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for a single term, from 1853 to 1854. ... Emory Washburn (1800–1877) was a United States political figure. ... Henry Joseph Gardner (June 14, 1819 – July 21, 1892) was the Governor of Massachusetts from 1855—1858. ... Nathaniel P. Banks, engraving from a Mathew Brady Carte de visite Nathaniel Prentice (or Prentiss)[1] Banks (January 30, 1816 – September 1, 1894), American politician and soldier, served as Governor of Massachusetts, Speaker of the House of the United States House of Representatives, and as a Union general in the... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... Alexander Hamilton Bullock (March 2, 1816–January 17, 1882) was Governor of Massachusetts from 1866 to 1868. ... William Claflin (1818-1905) was an industrialist and philanthropist who served as Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1869-1872 and as a member of Congress from 1877-1881. ... William Barrett Washburn (January 31, 1820–October 5, 1887) was an American politician from Massachusetts, serving in the United States House of Representatives and as Governor of Massachusetts. ... Thomas Talbot (September 7, 1818 – October 6, 1886) was a governor of Massachusetts. ... William Gaston (1820-1894) was Governor of Massachusetts in 1875-1876. ... Alexander Hamilton Rice (August 30, 1818 – July 22, 1895) was Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts from 1856-1857, a U.S. Congressman during the American Civil War, and the Governor of Massachusetts from 1876–78. ... Thomas Talbot (September 7, 1818 – October 6, 1886) was a governor of Massachusetts. ... John Davis Long (1838–1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. ... George Dexter Robinson (born George Washington Robinson) (January 20, 1834–February 22, 1896) was born in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Oliver Ames (February 4, 1831 - October 22, 1895) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Quincy Adams Brackett (June 8, 1842–April 6, 1918) was born in Bradford, New Hampshire to Ambrose S. Brackett and Nancy (Brown) Brackett. ... William Eustis Russell (January 6, 1857 - July 16, 1896) was a U.S. political figure. ... Frederic Thomas Greenhalge (born Greenhalgh) (July 19, 1842–March 5, 1896) was born in Clitheroe, England and immigrated with his parents to the United States in early childhood. ... Roger Wolcott (September 2, 1847 - December 21, 1900) was a significant U.S. political figure. ... Winthrop Murray Crane (1853 - 1920) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Lewis Bates (September 18, 1859–June 8, 1946) was born in North Easton, Massachusetts to Rev. ... William Lewis Douglas (1845 - 1924) was a U.S. political figure. ... Curtis Guild, Jr. ... Ebenezer Sumner Draper (1858 - 1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... David Ignatius Walsh (November 11, 1872 - June 11, 1947) was a United States politician from Massachusetts. ... Samuel Walker McCall (February 28, 1851 - November 4, 1923) was Governor of Massachusetts. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Channing Harris Cox (October 28, 1879 _ August 20, 1968) was a Massachusetts Republican politician and Governor born in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... Alvan Tufts Fuller (February 27, 1878-April 30, 1958) was an American political figure, and Governor of Massachusetts from 1925 until 1929. ... Frank G. Allen (October 6, 1874-October 5, 1950) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... Joseph Buell Ely (February 22, 1881-June 13, 1956) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... James Michael Curley (November 20, 1874-November 12, 1958) was an American political figure who served in the United States House of Representatives, as the mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, and as governor of Massachusetts. ... Charles Francis Hurley (November 24, 1893-March 24, 1946) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Maurice Joseph Tobin (May 22, 1901–July 19, 1953) was a Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, and U.S. Secretary of Labor. ... Robert Fiske Bradford (December 15, 1902–March 18, 1983) was an American politician who served one term as Governor of Massachusetts, from 1947 to 1949. ... Paul Andrew Dever (January 15, 1903 - April 11, 1958) was a Democratic politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Christian Herter For Christian Herter, 19th-century New York decorator, see Herter Brothers. ... John Foster Furcolo (July 29, 1911 - July 5, 1995) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. ... John Anthony Volpe (December 8, 1908 - September 11, 1994) was a Governor of Massachusetts and a U.S. Secretary of Transportation. ... Endicott Peabody (February 15, 1920–December 1, 1997) was a Governor of Massachusetts Peabody was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, served in the United States Navy during World War II, and received a BA and a law degree from Harvard University. ... John Anthony Volpe (December 8, 1908 - September 11, 1994) was a Governor of Massachusetts and a U.S. Secretary of Transportation. ... Francis William Sargent (July 29, 1915 - October 21, 1998) was Governor of Massachusetts from 1969 to 1975. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Edward Joseph King (born May 11, 1925) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts from 1979 to 1983. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Weld William Floyd Weld (born July 31, 1945) was the Republican Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1991 to 1997, resigning to pursue the ambassadorship to Mexico. ... Paul Cellucci Argeo Paul Cellucci (born April 24, 1948) better known as Paul Cellucci, is an American politician and diplomat, former Governor of Massachusetts, and former Ambassador to Canada. ... Jane Maria Swift (born February 24, 1965) is an American politician from Massachusetts. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
American Revolution - The Founding Fathers, Caleb Strong, Massachusetts (414 words)
Strong was born to Caleb and Phebe Strong on January 9, 1745 in Northampton, MA.
Strong was called home on account of illness in his family and so missed the opportunity to sign the Constitution.
Caleb Strong, the Federalist candidate, defeated Elbridge Gerry to become Governor of Massachusetts in 1800.
Caleb Strong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (338 words)
Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure.
Strong was elected as a delegate to the Philadelphia Convention that drafted the U.S. Constitution.
Strong died in 1819 in Northampton, Massachusetts, and is buried at the Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton, Massachusetts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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