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Encyclopedia > Cajun music
Cajun music
Stylistic origins
ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada; blues and juré music from African-American Louisiana Creoles
Cultural origins
Late18th century Cajuns and African-American Creoles in Louisiana; German;
Typical instruments
Accordion, Fiddle, Second Fiddle, Steel guitar, Guitar, Triangle, Harmonica. In the 1930s string band era, Mandolin, Banjo.
Mainstream popularity 1960s national interest; in US commercial advertising since the mid-1980s
Subgenres
black Creole
Fusion genres
Swamp pop, Zydeco


Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Cajun-influenced zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin. These French Louisiana sounds have influenced American popular music for many decades, especially country music, and have influenced pop culture through mass media, such as television commercials. A ballad is a story in song, usually a narrative song or poem. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Triangle (disambiguation). ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... Swamp pop musician Jivin Gene, circa 1959. ... Early Creole musicians playing an accordion and a washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana (1938). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A ballad is a story in song, usually a narrative song or poem. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ... This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... Early Creole musicians playing an accordion and a washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana (1938). ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... Louisiana sold in 1803 by Napoléon to USA, which was a portion of the historical extent of French Louisiana Louisiana (French language: La Louisiane) was the name of an administrative district of New France in the 17th and 18th centuries. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ...

Contents

Aural Analysis

Cajun music is relatively harsh with an infectious beat and a lot of forward drive, placing the accordion at the center. Besides the voices, only two melodic instruments are heard, the accordion and fiddle, but usually in the background can also be heard the high, clear tones of a metal triangle. The harmonies of Cajun music are simple, basically I and V, tonic and dominant. The melodic range is just one octave, rising a fifth above the tonic and descending a fourth below. Because the Cajun accordion can only be played in one key, and since an instrument must match the singer's range, much Cajun singing is sung in the singer's upper range. The accordionist gives the vocal melody greater energy by repeating most notes. [1] The Cajun accordion or Acadian accordion, also known as a melodeon, one-row accordion, or diatonic accordion, is a type of squeeze box built and played in south Louisiana primarily for Cajun and Zydeco music. ...


Subgenres of Cajun Music

See also the History of Cajun Music

Traditional Cajun

This style comprises the roots of Cajun dance music, involving only a few instruments such as the accordion, fiddle, and triangle. This form holds firm to a basic rhythm with staccato style notes, including lots of fiddle double stops. Each fiddle solo is composed of a major scale riff, repeated between verses. This form as existed since the early 1900s and the waltz and two-step are the most common dances of this Cajun music genre. Many songs that became standards in the Cajun music repertoire were first recorded in this period of the 1920s and 30s. For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... For other uses, see Rhythm (disambiguation). ... In musical notation, the Italian word staccato (literally detached, plural staccatos or staccati) indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner, with silence making up the latter part of the time allocated to each note. ... In music, playing double stops, on a bowed instrument, means playing on two strings at once. ... In music theory, the major scale or Ionian scale is one of the diatonic scales. ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... For other uses, see Waltz (disambiguation). ... Two-step (Two Step) is the name of several dances, some related to each other and some not. ...


Country/Texas Swing Cajun

This style involves heavy elements of Texas country music influence and a move away from the traditional accordion. This music has more of a "swing" style popularized by Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys. Instead of the music being dominated by the accordion, Cajun swing relies heavily on the fiddle and piano with a swinging tempo. Bands in the 1940s began using the steel guitar, an instrument which also found use in Dancehall Cajun music. Dances such as "the jig" are common among this genre of Cajun music. Harry Choates and the Hackberry Ramblers are early examples of this style, the Red Stick Ramblers and the Lost Bayou Ramblers are contemporary bands playing in this style. For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... James Robert (Bob) Wills (March 6, 1905 – May 13, 1975) was an American country musician, songwriter, and big band leader. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... Cajun Jig, also called Cajun One Step is the simplest one of all Cajun dances. ... The Hackberry Ramblers (also known as the Riverside Ramblers) is a Hackberry, Louisiana-based, Grammy Award-nominated Cajun music band, and since its heyday in the late 1930s has been one of the most recognized names and influential groups in Cajun music. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ...


Dancehall Cajun

This style is similar to traditional Cajun music with added accompaniment such as the bass guitar, drum set, steel guitar, and rhythm guitar, electric or acoustic. The same abrupt, staccato feel can be felt as in traditional Cajun. This is the post-War music of the late 1940s up to the present for local Louisianians in small town dancehalls. Electrification of the dance venues allowed the fiddle to be played in a smoother style, alternating leads with the accordion. The steel guitar also adds remarks. Typically in dancehall Cajun performances the melody is played by the accordion followed by a bridge, a vocal verse, a leading line by the steel guitar, a leading line by the fiddle, then a leading line by the accordion player again followed by a bridge. This is followed by the next vocal verse, and so on. A typical accompaniment pattern of a Mozart concert or aria. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... An extended 4-piece drum kit A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... In musical notation, the Italian word staccato (literally detached, plural staccatos or staccati) indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner, with silence making up the latter part of the time allocated to each note. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ...


Cajun "Renaissance"

Drawing on elements of the earlier Traditional, Texas Swing, and Dancehall periods, the Cajun "Renaissance" also incorporates more modern elements of folk, blues, jazz and swamp pop, and bluegrass styles. The fiddle players relax, involving a more legato feel to the solos. The quick fiddle action and double stops are missing, replaced by dominant blues chords and jazz slides. Folk can refer to a number of different things: It can be short for folk music, or, for folksong, or, for folklore; it may be a word for a specific people, tribe, or nation, especially one of the Germanic peoples; it might even be a calque on the related German... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Swamp pop musician Jivin Gene, circa 1959. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... In musical notation legato indicates that musical notes are played smoothly. ...


Pioneers such as Beausoleil with Michael Doucet, Zachary Richard, Jambalaya, Bruce Daigrepont, and others broke new ground, while other musicians such as Eddie LeJeune, Robert Jardell, the Frères Michot, and others brought energy to older, more traditional forms. Beausoleil (from left) David Doucet, Michael Doucet, Billy Ware, Al Tharp, Jimmy Breaux, Tommy Alesi. ... Michael Doucet (b. ...


Contemporary Cajun Music

This style involves Cajun music with a heavy influence of rock, R&B, blues, soul, and zydeco, producing a less traditional, more contemporary sound. Although led by the accordion, you can find the electric guitar, Washboard, and keyboard present in this form. Since the 1980s, musicians such as Wayne Toups, Roddie Romero and the Hub City Allstars, Lee Benoit, Damon Troy, Hunter Hayes, Kevin Naquin, and Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys have popularized this modern form of Cajun music.[2] [3] This article is about the genre. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Blues music redirects here. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Early Creole musicians playing an accordion and a washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana (1938). ... Two different electric guitars. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Wayne Toups is an American Cajun singer and songwriter. ... Hunter Hayes (born 1991 in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana) is a Cajun musician and songwriter who began performing at the age of three. ... Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys are a Cajun band band from southern Louisiana. ...


Lyrics

The unaccompanied ballad was the earliest form of Cajun music. The narrative songs often had passionate themes of death, solitude or ill-fated love — a reaction to their harsh exile and rough frontier experience, as well as celebrations of love and humorous tales. Ballads were ritually sung at weddings and funerals, and sung informally for small groups of people at house parties as the food cooked and young children played.


The early songs were mixtures of la la, contredanses, reels and jigs and other folk influences from black, white and Native American traditions. Early song lyrics were entirely in Cajun French. Though French language is still common, some Cajun music today is sung in English with younger singers and audiences. Thursday night contras in Cambridge, Massachusetts Contradance (also Contra dance, Contra-dance and other variant spellings) refers to several folk dance styles in which couples dance in two facing lines. ... The reel is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type. ... The jig (sometimes seen in its French language or Italian language forms gigue or giga) is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type, popular in Ireland and Scotland. ... Cajun French (sometimes called Louisiana Regional French [2]) is one of three varieties or dialects of the French language spoken primarily in the U.S. state of Louisiana, specifically in the southern parishes. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ...


Instruments

In earlier years, the fiddle was the predominant instrument. Usually two fiddles were common, one playing the melody while the other provided the séconde, or back-up part. Twin fiddling traditions represent the music in its purest form, as it was brought to Louisiana with the early immigrants and before popular American tunes mingled with it. “Fiddler” redirects here. ...


Gradually, the diatonic accordion emerged to share the limelight. The introduction of the accordion can be traced back to the Roberts Cove German immigrants during the late 1800s. For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... // Invention of the Jacquard loom in 1801. ...


In the early 1930s, the accordion was pushed into the background by the popular string sounds of the time. Mandolins, pianos and banjos joined fiddles to create a jazzy swing beat strongly influenced by Western Swing of neighboring Texas. Carved and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a stringed musical instrument. ... The piano Piano is a common abbreviation for pianoforte, a large musical instrument with a keyboard (see keyboard instrument). ... The banjo is a string instrument, derived from banjar, an African string instrument. ... Western swing is, first and foremost, a fusion of country music, several styles of jazz, pop music and blues aimed at dancers. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


After World War II, the accordion regained its popularity in Cajun music. Also, in the late 1930s and 1940s, country music became the dominant influence on Cajun music, and bass and steel guitars were used. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ...


Modern Cajun music began taking on the influence of jazz and modern country music, resulting in a more polished sound. The acoustic guitar was added, mostly as a rhythm instrument, and the triangle provided a traditional percussion. Modern groups sometimes include drums, electric bass, electric guitars and amplified accordion and fiddles. A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar with a solid or semi-solid body that utilizes electromagnetic pickup (music)s to convert the vibration of the steel-cored strings into electrical current. ...


Dance and festivals

Cajun music, born from ballads, has transformed to dance music -- with or without words. The music was essential for small get-togethers on the front porch, an all night house dance known as a "bal de maison", or a public dance in a dance hall called a fais do-dos. For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fais do-do is a name for a Cajun dance party, originating before World War II. According to Mark Humphreys notes from the Roots n Blues CD Cajun Dance Party - Fais Do-Do, the parties were named for ...the gentle command (go to sleep) young mothers offered bawling infants. ...


There are several variations of Cajun dance: a Cajun One Step, also called a Cajun Jig, a Cajun Two Step or related Cajun Jitterbug, and a Cajun Waltz. In mild contrast, zydeco dancing is a syncopated two-step or jitterbug. A Cajun dancer will cover the dance floor while the zydeco dancer will primarily dance in a smaller area. Cajun Jitterbug, also called Cajun One Step is the simplest one of all Cajun dances. ... Cajun Jig, also called Cajun One Step is the simplest one of all Cajun dances. ... dance ... Some people use the term for Cajun One Step. ... Zydeco as a dance style has its roots in a form of folk dance that corresponds to the heavily syncopated Zydeco music, originated in the beginning of the 20th century among the Francophone Creole peoples of Acadiana (south-west Louisiana). ... For other uses of the same name, see Syncopation (disambiguation). ... The Jitterbug is a swing dance, a subset of Lindy Hop, with an emphasis on 6-count moves and fast spins. ...


Cajun music can be found predominantly at Louisiana festivals and dance halls, in addition to weddings in Acadiana. A festival or fest is an event, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some theme, sometimes on some unique aspect of the community. ...


See also

The Cajun French Music Association is an association dedicated to the promotion and preservation of Cajun music and culture. ... . ... . ...

References

  1. ^ Miller, Terry E. and Andrew Shahriari. World Music: A Global Journey. London: Routledge, 2006: 374-5
  2. ^ www.lsue.edu "Wayne Toups and Zydecajun"
  3. ^ www.lsue.edu "Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys"

External links

Academic

It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: Article doesnt appear to meet notability according to WP:NOTFILM and makes no assertions that it does. ... An African American man gives a piano lesson to a young African American woman, in 1899 or 1900, in Georgia, USA. Photograph from a collection of W.E.B. DuBois. ... Appalachian folk music is a distinctive genre of folk music originating in the Appalachia region of the United States of America. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Look up ragtime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... Country music, once known as Country and Western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... The American folk music revival was a phenomenon in the United States in the 1950s to mid-1960s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Dixieland music is a style of jazz which developed in New Orleans at the start of the 20th century, and was spread to Chicago and New York City by New Orleans bands in the 1910s. ... IDNIANS SUCK BALLS American Indian music is the musics that are shared by or that distinguish American Indian tribes and First Nations. ... Spiritual as a noun is used to denote songs created by American slaves, and the style in which they were sung. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Swamp pop musician Jivin Gene, circa 1959. ... Tejano music (Spanish-Texan music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic populations of Central and Southern Texas. ... Western swing is, first and foremost, a fusion of country music, several styles of jazz, pop music and blues aimed at dancers. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Early Creole musicians playing an accordion and a washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana (1938). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... Cajun Jig, also called Cajun One Step is the simplest one of all Cajun dances. ... Some people use the term for Cajun One Step. ... The music of Louisiana can be divided in to three general regions. ... Dixieland music is a style of jazz which developed in New Orleans at the start of the 20th century, and was spread to Chicago and New York City by New Orleans bands in the 1910s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Jazz funeral is a unique American funeral tradition which occurs in New Orleans. ... The Louisiana blues is a type of blues music that is characterized by plodding rhythms that make the sound dark and tense. ... New Orleans, Louisiana, usually renowned as a center for musical creativity and influence, has been said to have an underdeveloped hip-hop scene compared to larger cities like New York and Los Angeles. ... The phrase New Orleans rhythm and blues refers to a type of R&B music from New Orleans, Louisiana, that is characterized by extensive use of piano and horn sections, complex rhythms and celebratory lyrics. ... Second line is a traditional dance style that developed in New Orleans, Louisiana in the mid 1800s. ... The swamp blues is a form of blues music that is highly evolved and specialized. ... Swamp pop musician Jivin Gene, circa 1959. ... Early Creole musicians playing an accordion and a washboard in front of a store, near New Iberia, Louisiana (1938). ... Zydeco as a dance style has its roots in a form of folk dance that corresponds to the heavily syncopated Zydeco music, originated in the beginning of the 20th century among the Francophone Creole peoples of Acadiana (south-west Louisiana). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cajun Music (3290 words)
His ear for music and his love of the accordion pointed the way to a career, and he began to play for local dances around the Lacassine area with an uncompromisingly scruffy band and no concession at all to the slick string-band style that still dominated when he started out in the 1940s.
Cajun music and folklife festivals abounded, where youngsters could actually see and hear Cajun musicians (law had kept them out of the bars and dancehalls where the music had previously been played).
Both times Cajun musicians decided instead to use what they could of the mainstream culture within what they felt to be the idiom of Cajun music, and to discard the rest.
Cajun music - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (734 words)
Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Catholics of Canada.
Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Cajun-influenced Zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin.
The music was essential for small get-togethers on the front porch, an all night house dance known as a "bal de maison", or a public dance in a dance hall called a fais do-dos.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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