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Encyclopedia > Cajun cuisine

Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or "Cajun" immigrants deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. An authentic Cajun meal is usually a three-pot affair, with one pot dedicated to the main dish, one dedicated to steamed rice, skillet cornbread, or some other grain dish, and the third containing whatever vegetable is plentiful or available. The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ... Flag History  - Established 1604  - English conquest 1713 Acadia (1754) Acadia (in the French language lAcadie) was the name given to a colonial territory in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day New England, stretching as far south as Philadelphia. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... It has been suggested that Local food network be merged into this article or section. ...


The aromatic vegetables bell pepper, onion, and celery are called by some chefs the holy trinity of Cajun cuisine. Finely diced and combined in cooking, the method is similar to the use of the mire poix in traditional French cuisine — which blends finely diced onion, celery, and carrot. Characteristic seasonings include parsley, bay leaf, "onion tops" or scallions, and dried cayenne pepper. The overall feel of the cuisine is more Mediterranean than North American. Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The holy trinity of cuisine are the three ingredients key to a particular cuisine. ... Mirepoix is the French name for a combination of onions, carrots and celery (either common Pascal celery or celeriac). ... French cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of France. ... This article is about the cultivated vegetable. ... This article is about the herb. ... bay leaves Bay leaf in Greek Daphni (plural bay leaves) is the aromatic leaf of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... Chopped spring onion The common name scallion(Or Don Patch sword as on Bobobo) is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb. ... A large red cayenne The Cayenne is a hot red chili pepper used to flavor dishes, and for medicinal purposes. ...


Cajun cuisine developed out of necessity. The Acadian refugees, farmers rendered destitute by the British expulsion, had to learn to live off the land and adapted their French rustic cuisine to local (i.e. Louisiana) ingredients such as rice, crawfish, and sugar cane. Many households were large, consisting of eight to twelve people; thus, regardless what other vocations may have been followed by the head of household, most families also farmed. Feeding a large family, all of whose members did hard physical work every day, required a lot of food. Cajun cuisine grew out of supplementing rice with what meat, game or other proteins were available such as crawfish or any other type of river creature. Deportation of Acadians order, read by Winslow in Grand-Pré church The Great Upheaval, also known as the Great Expulsion, The Deportation, the Acadian Expulsion, or to the deportees, Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced population transfer or ethnic cleansing of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Families Astacoidea   Astacidae   Cambaridae Parastacoidea   Parastacidae Crayfish, often referred to as crawfish, or crawdads, are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. ... Species Ref: ITIS 42058 as of 2004-05-05 Sugarcane is one of six species of a tall tropical southeast Asian grass (Family Poaceae) having stout fibrous jointed stalks whose sap at one time was the primary source of sugar. ...

Contents

Cajun methods of preparation

  • Barbecueing - similar to "slow and low" Texas barbecue traditions, but with Cajun seasoning.
  • Boiling - as in boiling of crabs, crawfish, or shrimp, in seasoned liquid.
  • Deep frying
  • Étouffée - cooking a vegetable or meat in its own juices, similar to braising or what in New Orleans is called "smothering".
  • Frying, also known as pan-frying.
  • Grilling - faster than barbecueing.
  • Injecting - using a large syringe-type setup to place seasoning deep inside large cuts of meat.
  • Smoking - for flavoring, cooking or preserving meats.
  • Stewing, also known as fricassee.

Deep-frying of turkeys or oven-roasted turduckens entered southern Louisiana cuisine more recently. Also, blackening of fish or chicken and barbecuing of shrimp in the shell are excluded because they were not prepared in traditional Cajun cuisine. See Misconceptions below. A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... Boiling, a type of phase transition, is the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which typically occurs when a liquid is heated to its boiling point, the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid is equal to the pressure exerted on the liquid by the surrounding atmospheric pressure. ... A Deep-fried Twinkie Deep-frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... Étouffée or etouffee is a Creole seafood dish typically served over rice, similar to gumbo, very popular in New Orleans and in the Cajun country of the Atchafalaya Basin to the west. ... Braising (from the French braiser) is cooking with moist heat, typically in a covered pot with a small amount of liquid which results in a particular flavor. ... Plantains frying in vegetable oil. ... Food cooking on a charcoal grill Grilling is a form of cooking that involves direct heat. ... A syringe nowadays nearly always means a medical syringe, but it can mean any of these: A simple hand-powered piston pump consisting of a plunger that can be pulled and pushed along inside a cylindrical tube (the barrel), which has a small hole on one end, so it can... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Smoking Smoking is the process of preserving, cooking, or flavoring food by exposing it to the smoke from burning or smoldering plant materials, most often wood. ... In cooking, stewing means preparing meat cut into smaller pieces or cubes by simmering it in liquid, usually together with vegetables. ... A well roasted 30 lb. ... Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or Cajun immigrants deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. ...


Cajun ingredients

The following is a partial list of ingredients used in Cajun cuisine and some of the staple ingredients of the Acadian food culture. A staple food is a food that forms the basis of a traditional diet. ...


Grains

c. 1938 Cajun woman using crude mortar and pestle in process of hulling rice. Near Crowley, Louisiana.
c. 1938 Cajun woman using crude mortar and pestle in process of hulling rice. Near Crowley, Louisiana.
  • Corn
  • Rice — long, medium, or short grain white; also popcorn rice
Rice proved to be a valuable commodity in early Acadiana. With an abundance of water and a hot, humid climate, rice could be grown practically anywhere in the region, and grew feral in some areas. Rice became the predominant starch in the diet, easy to grow, store, and prepare. The oldest rice mill in operation in the United States, the Conrad Rice Mill, is located in New Iberia.
  • Wheat (for baking bread)

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The city of Crowley is the parish seat of Acadia Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... The city of New Iberia (French: La Nouvelle-Ibérie) is the parish seat of Iberia Parish, in the US state of Louisiana, 125 miles (201 km) west of New Orleans. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ...

Fruits and vegetables

Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... This article is about the fruit. ... A large red cayenne The Cayenne is a hot red chili pepper used to flavor dishes, and for medicinal purposes. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial nomenclature Cucumis sativus Ref: ITIS 22364 The cucumber is the edible fruit of the cucumber plant Cucumis sativus, which belongs to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, as do melons and squash. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article is about the fruit. ... Binomial name (Jacq. ... Categories: Stub | Fruit | Grape varieties ... Binomial name (L.) Moench Okra (American English: , British English ), also known as ladys finger[1], bhindi (Hindustani) and gumbo, is a flowering plant in the mallow family (along with such species as cotton and cocoa) valued for its edible green fruits. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. ... The satsuma mandarin (Citrus reticulata) was first introduced to the United States from Japan in 1876. ... Chopped spring onion The common name scallion(Or Don Patch sword as on Bobobo) is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb. ... For other uses, see Strawberry (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Lam. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ...

Meat and seafood

Cajun folkways include many ways of preserving meat, some of which are waning due to the availability of refrigeration and mass-produced meat at the grocer. Smoking of meats remains a fairly common practice, but once-common preparations such as turkey or duck confit (preserved in poultry fat, with spices) are now seen even by Acadians as quaint rarities. Mass production is the production of large amounts of standardised products on production lines. ... Duck confit is a French dish made with duck legs. ...


Game (and hunting) are still uniformly popular in Acadiana. This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ...


The recent increase of catfish farming in the Mississippi Delta has brought about an increase in its usage in Cajun cuisine in the place of the more traditional wild-caught trout and redfish. This article is about the siluriform catfishes; for the Atlantic catfish, see Seawolf (fish); for other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation). ... The shared flood plain of the Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers The Mississippi Delta is the distinct northwest section of the state of Mississippi that lies between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. ...

Seafood

Also included in the seafood mix are some so-called "trash fish" that would not sell at market because of their high bone to meat ratio or required complicated cooking methods. These were brought home by fishermen to feed the family. Examples are garfish, gaspergou, croaker, and bream. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Bass (IPA /bæs/) is a name shared by many different species of popular game fish. ... This article is about the siluriform catfishes; for the Atlantic catfish, see Seawolf (fish); for other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Morone americana (Gmelin, 1789) The white perch, Morone americana, is a fish of the temperate bass family Moronidae, notable as a food and game fish of eastern North America. ... For the unit of measurement, see pole. ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Micropterus punctulatus (Rafinesque, 1819) The spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. ... Pompano is the common name of the Trachinotus genus of the Carangidae family. ... Genera See text. ... Flounder or flukes are flatfish that live in ocean waters ie. ... Genera Acanthistius Alphestes Anyperidon Caprodon Cephalopholis Cromileptes Dermatolepis Epinephelus Gonioplectrus Gracila HypoplectrodesLiopropoma Mycteroperca Niphon Paranthias Plectropomus Saloptia Triso Variola For the computer program, see Grouper (Windows application). ... Species P. flavescens (Yellow perch) P. fluviatilis (European perch) P. schrenkii (Balkhash perch) For other meanings of the word perch, including fish not in the Perca genus, see Perch (disambiguation). ... Genera Aphareus Aprion Apsilus Etelis Hemilutjanus Hoplopagrus Lipocheilus Lutjanus Macolor Ocyurus Paracaesio Pinjalo Pristipomoides Randallichthys Rhomboplites Symphorus Snapper can also refer to the Snapping turtle. ... Families Astacoidea   Astacidae   Cambaridae Parastacoidea   Parastacidae Crayfish, often referred to as crawfish, or crawdads, are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters, to which they are closely related. ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... The name oyster is used for a number of different groups of mollusks which grow for the most part in marine or brackish water. ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ...


Poultry

Pork A well roasted 30 lb. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... Geese redirects here. ... This article is about the bird. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Oxyurinae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. ...

  • Andouille - a spicy dry smoked sausage, characterized by a coarse-ground texture
  • Boudin - a fresh sausage made with green onions, pork, and rice. Pig's blood is sometimes added to produce "boudin rouge".
  • Chaurice, similar to the Spanish chorizo
  • Chaudin - a pig's stomach, stuffed with spiced pork & smoked. Also known as ponce.
  • Ham hocks
  • Head cheese
  • Gratons - hog cracklings or pork rinds; fried, seasoned pork fat & skin, sometimes with small bits of meat attached. Similar to the Spanish chicharrones.
  • Pork sausage (fresh) - not smoked or cured, but highly seasoned. Mostly used in gumbos. The sausage itself does not include rice, separating it from boudin.
  • Salt Pork
  • Tasso - a highly seasoned, smoked pork shoulder

Beef and dairy
Though parts of Acadiana are well suited to cattle or dairy farming, beef is not often used in a pre-processed or uniquely Cajun form. It is usually prepared fairly simply as chops, stews, or steaks, taking a cue from Texas to the west. Ground beef is used as is traditional throughout the southern US, although seasoned differently. Cajun Andouille, From Wayne Jacobs Smokehouse in La Place, Louisiana. ... Boudin (pronounced BOO-danh, IPA ) describes a number of different types of sausage used in French, Creole and Cajun cuisine. ... Chorizo (in Spanish; IPA: [tʃoriθo] or [tʃoɹɪso]) or Chouriço (in Portuguese) is a term encompassing several types of pork sausage originating from the Iberian Peninsula. ... Ham hocks are essential ingredients in soul food and other forms of Southern country cooking. ... Head cheese is in fact not a cheese, but rather a terrine made of meat taken from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow) that would not otherwise be considered appealing. ...


Dairy farming is not as prevalent as in the past, but there are still some farms in the business. There are no unique dairy items prepared in Cajun cuisine. Traditional southern US and New Orleans influenced desserts are common.


Other


For other uses, see Alligator (disambiguation). ... A bag of frog legs from Vietnam. ... Binomial name Myocastor coypus (Molina, 1782) The Coypu (Myocastor coypus) or Nutria is a large, crepuscular, semiaquatic rodent native to South America, but now also present in Europe, Asia, and North America. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Turtle (disambiguation). ...

Seasonings

c. 1938 Cajun woman reaching for strings of garlic suspended from rafters. Near Crowley, Louisiana.
c. 1938 Cajun woman reaching for strings of garlic suspended from rafters. Near Crowley, Louisiana.

Individual Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The city of Crowley is the parish seat of Acadia Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ...

Blended bay leaves Bay leaf in Greek Daphni (plural bay leaves) is the aromatic leaf of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... Binomial name L.[1] Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... A large red cayenne The Cayenne is a hot red chili pepper used to flavor dishes, and for medicinal purposes. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the herb. ... This article is about the Sassafras tree. ... Species Saccharum arundinaceum Saccharum bengalense Saccharum edule Saccharum officinarum Saccharum procerum Saccharum ravennae Saccharum robustum Saccharum sinense Saccharum spontaneum Sugarcane or Sugar cane (Saccharum) is a genus of 6 to 37 species (depending on taxonomic interpretation) of tall perennial grasses (family Poaceae, tribe Andropogoneae), native to warm temperate to tropical... Brown sugar typical of that bought in Western supermarkets Brown sugar is a sucrose sugar product with a distinctive brown color due to the presence of molasses. ... Species About 350 species, including: Thymus adamovicii Thymus altaicus Thymus amurensis Thymus bracteosus Thymus broussonetii Thymus caespititius Thymus camphoratus Thymus capitatus Thymus capitellatus Thymus camphoratus Thymus carnosus Thymus cephalotus Thymus cherlerioides Thymus ciliatus Thymus cilicicus Thymus cimicinus Thymus comosus Thymus comptus Thymus curtus Thymus disjunctus Thymus doerfleri Thymus glabrescens Thymus...

  • "Cajun spice" blends such as Tony Chachere's are sometimes used in Acadiana kitchens, but do not suit every cook's style because Cajun-style seasoning is often achieved from scratch, even by taste. Whole peppers are almost never used in authentic Cajun dishes — ground Cayenne, paprika, and pepper sauces predominate.
  • Hot sauce
  • Seafood boil mix
  • Vinegar seasoned with small, pickled, hot green peppers is a common condiment with many Cajun meals.

Cooking bases Tony Chacheres is a seasoning indiginous to Acadiana (a portion of south Louisiana where Cajun culture is strongest). ... For the streetball player, see Philip Champion. ... Seafood boil is the generic term for any number of different kinds of social events in which shellfish is the central element. ...

  • Dark roux: The Acadians inherited the roux from the French. However, unlike the French, it is made with oil or bacon fat and more lately olive oil, and not butter, and it is used as a flavoring, especially in gumbo and etoufée. Preparation of a dark roux is probably the most involved or complicated procedure in Cajun cuisine, involving heating fat and flour very carefully, constantly stirring for about 15-45 minutes (depending on the color of the desired product), until the mixture has darkened in color and developed a nutty flavor. A burnt roux renders a dish unpalatable. The scent of a good roux is so strong that even after leaving one's house the smell of roux is still embedded in one's clothes until they are washed. The scent is so strong and recognizable that others are able to tell if one is making a roux, and often infer that one is making a gumbo.
  • Stocks: Acadian stocks are more heavily seasoned than Continental counterparts, and the shellfish stock sometimes made with shrimp and crawfish heads is unique to Cajun cuisine.

For other uses, see Roux (disambiguation). ... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... Stock is a flavoured liquid. ... Court bouillon is french for short broth. ...

Cajun dishes

Noted by the popular Hank Williams' Jambalaya song, three of the primary dishes in Acadiana are "Jambalaya and-a crawfish pie and filé gumbo." One variation is that crawfish boils are more popular today than crawfish pies. For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Jambalaya (On the Bayou) is a song credited to Hank Williams, released in 1952, which reached great popularity in two genres: country and popular music. ...


Primary favorites

Boudin
Boudin (sometimes spelled "boudain")[1] is a type of sausage made from pork, pork liver, rice, garlic and green onion, and other spices. It is widely available by the link or pound from butcher shops. Boudin is usually made daily as it does not keep well for very long, even frozen. Boudin is typically stuffed in a natural casing and has a softer consistency than other, better-known sausage varieties. It is usually served with side dishes such as rice dressing, maque choux, or bread. Boudin (pronounced BOO-danh, IPA ) describes a number of different types of sausage used in French, Creole and Cajun cuisine. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Green Onion can refer to: Scallion, various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully developed bulb Green Onion - (בצל ירוק, Batzal Yarok) an Israeli band Green Onions, a 1962 soul instrumental by Booker T. & the M.G.s Green Onions (album), a 1962 album containing the above instrumental Category: ... This article is about sausage casings. ... Maque choux (pronounced: mock shoe) is a traditional dish of southern Louisiana. ...


Gumbo
High on the list of favorites of Cajun cooking are the soups called gumbos. Gumbo exemplifies the influence of African and Native American food cultures on Cajun cuisine. The word originally meant okra, which is a word brought to the region from western Africa. Okra, which is a principal ingredient of many gumbo recipes, is used as a thickening agent and for its distinct vegetable flavor. A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ... Native American Cuisine includes all food practices of the native peoples of the Americas. ... Binomial name (L.) Moench Okra (American English: , British English ), also known as ladys finger[1], bhindi (Hindustani) and gumbo, is a flowering plant in the mallow family (along with such species as cotton and cocoa) valued for its edible green fruits. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


A filé gumbo is thickened with sassafras leaves, a practice borrowed from the Choctaw Indians. The backbone of a gumbo is a dark roux, which is made of flour, toasted until well browned, and fat or oil, not butter as with the French. The classic gumbo is made with chicken and the Cajun sausage called andouille, but the ingredients all depend on what is available at the moment. This article is about the Sassafras tree. ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roux (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with vegetable oil. ... For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cajun Andouille, From Wayne Jacobs Smokehouse in La Place, Louisiana. ...


Jambalaya
Another classic Cajun dish is jambalaya. The only certain thing that can be said about a jambalaya is that it contains rice and almost anything else. Usually, however, one will find green peppers, onions, celery and hot chile peppers. Anything else is optional. Improvised looking bowl of jambalaya This article is about the food. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The chile pepper, chili pepper, or chilli pepper, or simply chile, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ...


Food as an event

Crawfish boil

Louisiana-style crawfish boil

The crawfish boil is a celebratory event where Cajuns boil crawfish, potatoes, onions and corn over large propane cookers. Lemons and small muslin bags containing a mixture of bay leaves, mustard seeds, cayenne pepper and other spices, commonly known as "crab boil" or "crawfish boil" are added to the water for seasoning. The results are then dumped onto large, newspaper-draped tables and covered in spice blends. Zatarain's, Louisiana Fish Fry and Tex Joy are popular commercial blends. Cocktail sauce, mayonnaise and Tabasco are common condiments. The seafood is scooped onto large trays or plates and eaten by hand. During times when crawfish are not abundant, shrimp and crabs are prepared and served in the same manner. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 699 KB) Summary Photo by Rob Hingle (me) taken during Jazz Fest 2005 in Mid City, New Orleans, La. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 699 KB) Summary Photo by Rob Hingle (me) taken during Jazz Fest 2005 in Mid City, New Orleans, La. ... Seafood boil is the generic term for any number of different kinds of social events in which shellfish is the central element. ... Cocktail sauce in its simplest form is ketchup mixed with prepared horseradish (In the United Kingdom and Iceland, mayonnaise is usually mixed with the ketchup, similar to fry sauce). ... The classic Tabasco red pepper sauce Tabasco sauce is a brand of hot sauce made from tabasco peppers (Capsicum frutescens var. ...


Attendees are encouraged to "suck the head" of a crawfish by separating the abdomen of the crustacean and sucking out the abdominal fat/juices. The practice is known by the common phrase is "Pinch the tail, suck the head." Other popular practices include kissing the tail section of a soon-to-be-cooked crawfish, leading to the vulgar phrase: "Kiss my ass, suck my head, eat me." The phrase has been printed on shirts and posters in years past. For the Dutch band, see Crustacean (band). ...


Often, newcomers to the crawfish boil or those unfamiliar with the traditions are jokingly warned "not to eat the dead ones." When live crawfish are boiled, their tails curl beneath themselves. When dead crawfish are boiled, their tails are straight and limp.


Seafood boils with crabs and shrimp are also popular.


Boucherie
The traditional pig-slaughtering party, or Boucherie, where Cajuns would gather to socialize, play music, dance, and preserve meat does still occur in some rural communities, especially St. Martinville, but the exploitation of every last bit of meat, including organs and variety cuts in sausages such as 'boudin' (sometimes spelled boudain) and the inaccessible bits in the head as head cheese is no longer a necessity. The city of St. ... Boudin (pronounced BOO-danh, IPA ) describes a number of different types of sausage used in French, Creole and Cajun cuisine. ... Head cheese is in fact not a cheese, but rather a terrine made of meat taken from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow) that would not otherwise be considered appealing. ...


Other dishes and sides

This article is about the salad. ... A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ... Cornbread or Johnny cake is a generic name for any number of quick breads (a bread leavened chemically, rather than by yeast) containing cornmeal. ... Seafood boil is the generic term for any number of different kinds of social events in which shellfish is the central element. ... Maque choux (pronounced: mock shoe) is a traditional dish of southern Louisiana. ... Tasso Ham is a specialty of Cajun cuisine. ... This article is about the siluriform catfishes; for the Atlantic catfish, see Seawolf (fish); for other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Micropterus punctulatus (Rafinesque, 1819) The spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. ... Étouffée or etouffee is a Creole seafood dish typically served over rice, similar to gumbo, very popular in New Orleans and in the Cajun country of the Atchafalaya Basin to the west. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Head cheese is in fact not a cheese, but rather a terrine made of meat taken from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow) that would not otherwise be considered appealing. ... Sucking pig is a young pig that has only fed on its mothers milk. ... Cajun Andouille, From Wayne Jacobs Smokehouse in La Place, Louisiana. ... Dirty rice is a traditional Cajun dish made from white rice cooked with small pieces of chicken liver or giblets, which give it a dark (dirty) color. ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... Beignet and iced café au lait at Café Du Monde in New Orleans A beignet ([bεɲ.e] pronounced ben–YAY, from the Middle French word for bump), in American English, refers to a French doughnut being a pastry made from deep-fried dough and sprinkled with confectioners sugar. ... Binomial name Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. ... Pralines on a cutting board Pralines and box posed Pralines in a box Praline is a family of confections made from nuts and sugar syrup. ... Binomial name (Jacq. ... The classic Tabasco red pepper sauce Tabasco sauce is a brand of hot sauce made from tabasco peppers (Capsicum frutescens var. ...

Misconceptions

 Authentic Cajun food... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  • is not fancy.
  • is not extremely hot from pepper.
  • does not use wine as part of the cooking.
  • does not require expensive or exotic ingredients.
  • is not available from a box.
  • is often simple and brown.
  • does not contain cream or pasta as an ingredient.
  • is not often seen on restaurant menus.
  • does not frequently use blackened meat.
  • can be successfully made in areas outside of Cajun Country

There is a common misconception outside of south Louisiana that Cajun food is hot and spicy. An authentic Cajun dish will usually have a bit of a "kick" but will not be eye-wateringly hot. The Cajun cook does not seek to overpower the dish with simple heat — this is done by the diner at the table if they so wish. Cayenne pepper is the predominant choice of heat during preparation, though ground black pepper, and to a lesser extent white pepper, are used as well.


Cajun dishes prepared outside of Louisiana, are often hotter and more heavily seasoned than their Louisiana counterparts, missing the flavor of the original dishes. Even andouille sausage, mild and smoky in Louisiana, gets the pepper treatment elsewhere. This is partially a result of the "Cajun" foods craze of the 1980s, when Cajun-style seasoning was popularized by chef Paul Prudhomme's creation of the very spicy dish called Blackened Redfish at his New Orleans restaurant "K-Paul's". It is also a result of recent "extreme" food fads, where many items are hotter than the originals. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Paul Prudhomme (born July 13, 1940) is an American chef famous for his Cajun cuisine. ...


Outside of southern Louisiana, foods prepared using Cajun-style seasoning are called Cajun, including some decidedly non-Cajun dishes such as red beans and rice, and blackened redfish. Sometimes the label is applied incorrectly to any dish including traditional Cajun ingredients such as cayenne pepper, or merely as a slogan, as in McDonalds' "Spicy Cajun McChicken". Red bean can mean: Azuki bean (Vigna angularis), most common in East Asia Rice bean (Vigna umbellata) Any of various red varieties of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), including the kidney bean, Honduran red bean, and Salvadoran red bean This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants [1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ...


Chefs trained in Louisiana, as well as Louisiana raised chefs can and do duplicate the original tastes successfully elsewhere, especially since the advent of mail-order ingredient deliveries. However, the buyer should beware that what may be a perfectly palatable dish may not be strictly "authentic".


Cajun cuisine is sometimes confused with Creole cuisine, and many outside of Louisiana don't make the distinction. Creole is more city – urban, cosmopolitan, and inspired by the French, Spanish, African, and Italian influences of New Orleans – while Cajun dishes have more of a French influence, filtered through common (to Louisiana) ingredients and techniques. This matter is complicated by the sharing of several dishes between the cuisines, including gumbo, gumbo z'herbes (a vegetarian gumbo), seafood à l'étouffée, and jambalaya, although New Orleans jambalaya and gumbo are prepared differently from their Cajun counterparts. Louisiana Creole cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana (centered on the Greater New Orleans area) that blends French, Spanish, and American influences. ... A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ... Étouffée or etouffee is a Creole seafood dish typically served over rice, similar to gumbo, very popular in New Orleans and in the Cajun country of the Atchafalaya Basin to the west. ...


Further complicating this is that the term Creole is used to designate several somewhat distinct New Orleans food cultures. So-called 'haute-creole' cuisine was influenced in the past few decades by Cajun food as Creole restaurants such as Commander's Palace and K-Paul's created a distinct "Cajun-Creole fusion" cuisine combining Cajun flavors with Creole ingredients and preparation. Dishes rooted primarily in the New Orleans metropolitan area such as po'-boys, barbecued shrimp, or red beans and rice are in general Creole, not Cajun, as are most dishes involving a cream sauce or the French mother sauces. Commanders Palace is a restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. It was built in 1880. ... The New Orleans Metropolitan Area, consisting of the Greater New Orleans region and three addtional parishes which share the perimeter of Lake Ponchartrain, is the largest metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Louisiana, centered around the city of New Orleans. ...


Non-Cajun dishes

This is a listing of dishes sometimes mistakenly called or thought to be Cajun but having origins elsewhere, usually in New Orleans or in northern Louisiana, and sometimes are relatively unadopted in Acadiana: NOLA redirects here. ...

Bananas Foster Bananas Foster is a dessert made from bananas and vanilla ice cream, with the sauce made from butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, dark rum, and banana liqueur. ... Austin Leslies Creole Bread Pudding with Vanilla Whiskey Sauce, From the late Pampys Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... In cooking, en brochette refers to food cooked, and sometimes served, on brochettes, or skewers. ... Calas are deep fried rice cakes, made with sugar, flour, eggs and rice. ... A Turkey Fryer A Turkey Fryer is an apparatus for deep frying a turkey. ... Oysters Rockefeller is a famous oyster dish created at the New Orleans institution Antoines. ... Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits logo Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits is a chain of fried chicken fast food restaurants that is controlled by Atlanta-based AFC Enterprises, which is also the operator of Churchs Chicken and Cinnabon. ... Red beans and rice is an emblematic dish of Louisiana Creole cuisine (not originally of Cajun cuisine), traditionally made on Mondays with red beans, rice, spices, and pork bones left over from Sunday dinner. ...

Cajun or Cajun-influenced chefs

Tony Chacheres is a seasoning indiginous to Acadiana (a portion of south Louisiana where Cajun culture is strongest). ... John Folse (born 1946, St. ... Emeril John Lagasse (born October 15, 1959, Fall River, Massachusetts, U.S.) is an American celebrity chef, restaurateur, television personality, and cookbook author. ... Paul Prudhomme (born July 13, 1940) is an American chef famous for his Cajun cuisine. ... Justin Wilson (24 April 1914 - 5 September 2001) was a Southern American chef and humorist known for his brand of Cajun cuisine-inspired cooking and humor. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Boudain, from Answers.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  2. ^ This technique can be dangerous. Some safety precautions can be found at Product Safety Tips: Turkey Fryers. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen (ISBN 0-688-02847-0), from the main popularizer of Cajun flavors, this is the definitive "high" Cajun cookbook. Most of the recipes within are very traditional, with a world class chef's added touch.
  • Chef John Folse's Plantation Celebrations (ISBN 0-9625152-2-1), a well-regarded cookbook from one of the great Cajun chefs.
  • Louisiana Real and Rustic (ISBN 0-688-12721-5) by Emeril Lagasse with Marcelle Bienvenu. Despite Emeril's association with the Cajun/Creole fusion movement, this collaboration with Times-Picayune food writer Bienvenu is a bona fide and authentic look at the food folkways of Louisiana, with much focus on rural Acadiana. Marcelle Bienvenue is a native of St. Martinville, LA, in St. Martin Parish.
  • Cajun Cuisine: Authentic Cajun Recipes from Louisiana's Bayou Country (ISBN 0-935619-00-3) by W. Thomas Angers.
  • Chef John Folse's Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine (ISBN 0970445717) is considered by most cooks in Louisiana (as well as the vast majority of professional chefs in Louisiana) to be the most authentic and accurate cookbook produced so far. The book describes the history as well as the methods of preparation of both Cajun and Creole foods. It is indispensable because it compares and contrasts the two cuisines. Most Louisiana residents that consider themselves to be serious about food own a copy.

Paul Prudhomme (born July 13, 1940) is an American chef famous for his Cajun cuisine. ... John Folse (born 1946, St. ... Emeril John Lagasse (born October 15, 1959, Fall River, Massachusetts, U.S.) is an American celebrity chef, restaurateur, television personality, and cookbook author. ... The New Orleans Times-Picayune is the major daily newspaper serving New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... St. ... St. ... John Folse (born 1946, St. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cajun cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1992 words)
Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or "Cajun" immigrants in Louisiana, USA.
Cajun dishes prepared outside of Louisiana, are often hotter than their Louisiana counterparts, and lack the flavor of the original dishes.
Cajun cuisine is sometimes confused with Creole cuisine, and many outside of Louisiana don't make the distinction.
Cajun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3172 words)
The Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting of the descendants of Acadians who settled primarily in Louisiana after they were expelled from the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island in 1755 as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown.
Cajun populations today are found also in the area south of New Orleans and scattered in areas adjacent to the French Louisiana region, such as to the north in Alexandria, Louisiana and in Southeastern Texas.
Cajun French is a variety or dialect of the French language spoken primarily in the Acadiana region of Louisiana.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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