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Encyclopedia > Café
Coffeehouse - Wikipedia

Coffeehouse

From Wikipedia

Street Cafe, Jerusalem, steel engraving after a drawing by Henry Fenn, in Picturesque Palestine ca 1875 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current...
Street Cafe, Jerusalem, steel engraving after a drawing by Henry Fenn, in Picturesque Palestine ca 1875 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current... Enlarge
"A Street Cafe, Jerusalem," Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875

A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or café shares some of the characteristics of a Categories: Stub ... bar, and some of the characteristics of a A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. The term covers a multiplicity of venues and a diversity of cuisine styles. Restaurants are sometimes a feature of a larger complex, typically a hotel, where the... restaurant. In the United States, it does not emphasize alcoholic beverages; typically, it does not offer alcoholic beverages at all, focusing instead on Coffee beans and a cup of coffee Coffee as a drink, usually served hot, is prepared from the roasted seeds (beans) of the coffee plant. Coffee bean types Coffea arabica - Brazil There are two main species of the coffee plant; Coffea arabica is the traditional coffee, and considered superior in... coffee and perhaps This article is about the beverage. For alternative meanings, see tea (disambiguation). A tea bush. Tea drinking in China dates back to before the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Tea is a caffeinated beverage, an infusion made by steeping the dried leaves or buds of the shrub Camellia sinensis in hot... tea and hot A stack of chocolate pieces, including milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and white chocolate. Chocolate block in melted chocolate Sculptural chocolate in Spain Chocolate is a common ingredient in many kinds of sweets—one of the most popular in the world. Chocolate is made from the fermented, roasted and ground... chocolate. Other food may range from baked goods to soups and sandwiches, other casual meals, and light desserts that complement their caffeine-centric fare.

Table of contents

History

Playing cards in a coffeehouse, Damascus. Source: Antonio Milena/ABr. 01.Dec.2003 Photograph copied from the website of Agência Brasil, which states: The Agência Brasil makes images and photos available free of charge. To comply with existing law, we kindly request our users to list the credits...
Playing cards in a coffeehouse, Damascus. Source: Antonio Milena/ABr. 01.Dec.2003 Photograph copied from the website of Agência Brasil, which states: The Agência Brasil makes images and photos available free of charge. To comply with existing law, we kindly request our users to list the credits... Enlarge
Coffeehouse in Damascus

In Persia, since the 16th century, the coffeehouse (qahveh-khaneh) has served as a social gathering place where men assemble to drink coffee or tea, listen to music, play chess and backgammon, perhaps hear a recitation from the Shahnameh Shahnameh The Shahnama (Book of Kings) also written Shahnameh, written by Ferdowsi around 1000 AD, is the national epic of Iran and one of the definite classics of world literature. The contents and the poets style in describing the events takes the readers back to the ancient times... Shahnameh. In modern Iran, coffeehouses may attract a male crowd to watch the public TV.


The traditional tale of the beginnings of This article is about the city and federal state in Austria. For other places or things called Vienna, see Vienna (disambiguation). Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). Situated on both sides of the river... Viennese coffeehouses from the mysterious sacks of green beans left behind when the Turks failed in their Engraving of clashes between the Austrians and Ottomans outside Vienna, 1529 The Siege of Vienna of 1529, as distinct from the Battle of Vienna in 1683, represented the farthest Westward advance into Central Europe of the Ottoman Empire, and of all the clashes between the armies of Christianity and Islam... Siege of Vienna in Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. June 12 - The Rye House Plot to assassinate Charles II of England is discovered September 7 - Polish-German troops arrive in Vienna to help the besieged November 1 - The British crown colony of New York is... 1683, offered to the Viennese by a knowing Turkish-speaking Pole named Kolschitzky is often retold. It has the ring of apochrypa to skeptics who find the story too pat— and the date too late.


Coffeehouses first became popular in Europe upon the introduction of coffee in the (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. During this period, the power of England and the United Provinces increased; while that of Spain and Portugal declined. Similarly, the power... 17th century. The first London coffeehouse opened in 1652. Though Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. Charles IIs father, Charles I, had been executed in... Charles II later tried to suppress them as "places where the disaffected met, and spread scandalous reports concerning the conduct of His Majesty and his Ministers" (a criticism that is still made), the public flocked to them. They quickly became meeting places where business could be carried on, news exchanged and the A gazette is a newspaper. In the governments of Commonwealth countries a gazette is more specifically an official government paper that publishes all new laws and government decisions. The word comes from gazet, a Venetian coin that was the cost of early many Italian newspapers and became a name for... gazettes read. By Events March 20 - Nadir Shah occupies Delhi in India and sacks the city stealing the jewels of the Peacock Throne, including the Kohinoor September 9 - Stono Rebellion erupts near Charleston September 18 - Treaty of Belgrade signed October 3 - Treaty of Nissa signed October 23 - Great Britain declares war on Spain... 1739 there were 551 coffeehouses in London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. Founded as Londinium, the capital of... London, including meeting places for The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. To this day it is often used as a shortened alternative for Conservative. A similar usage for Tory exists in Canada to describe the Conservative Party. It was also used during the American Revolutionary... Tories and This article is about the British Whig party. For other uses of the word Whig, see the disambiguation page. For a long time in British politics, the two main parties were the Tories (the Conservative Party) and the Whigs. The term Whig originates from the Exclusion Bill crisis of 1678... Whigs, people of fashion or the "cits" of the old city center, coffeehouses known as gathering-places for the wits or for stockjobbers, merchants and lawyers, booksellers and authors. According to one French visitor, the Abbé Prévost, coffeehouses, "where you have the right to read all the papers for and against the government," were the "seats of English liberty."


Ladies were not permitted in coffeehouses. In a well-known engraving of a The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Parisian coffeehouse of ca 1700, the gentlemen hang their hats on pegs and sit at long communal tables strewn with papers and writing implements. Coffeepots are ranged at an open fire, with a hanging cauldron of boiling water. The only woman present presides, decently separated in a canopied booth, whence she doles out coffee in tall cups.


In London, coffeehouses preceded the This article is about Clubs in the context of playing cards. For other uses of the words club and clubs see club (disambiguation). Clubs (♣) is one of the four suits found in playing cards, marked with a black trefoil; the term is translated from the Spanish basto. It is... clubs of the mid-18th century, which skimmed away some of the more aristocratic clientele. Lloyds of London is a British insurance market. It serves as a meeting place where multiple financial backers or members, whether individuals (traditionally known as names) or corporations, come together to pool and spread risk. Unlike most of its competitors in the reinsurance market, it is not a single... Lloyd's of London started in a coffeehouse. Auctions in salesrooms attached to coffeehouses provided the start for the great auction houses of Sothebys is a noted auction house. The first ever Sothebys sale was held on March 11th, 1744 when the companys founder, Samuel Baker, presided over the disposal of several hundred scarce and valuable books. Today, the firm has an annual turnover of approximately US$2 billion, and... Sotheby's and Christies is a world-famous auction house located in London. It was founded on December 5, 1766 by James Christie. Christies quickly established a reputation for conducting some the greatest auctions of the 18th and 19th centuries. During this time, Christies regularly auctioned off significant amounts of... Christie's. In This article documents the history of New York City part of present day New York State. For the history of the State of New York, see the article History of New York. Prehistoric era About 75,000 years ago, during the last ice age, the area of present day New... New York the Tontine Coffeehouse at the foot of View up Wall Street from Pearl Street Wall Street is the name of a narrow thoroughfare in lower Manhattan running east from Broadway downhill to the East River. Considered to be the historical heart of the Financial District, it was the first permanent home of the New York Stock Exchange... Wall Street near the docks became a central meeting place. In small cities a coffeehouse functioned as a place where messages might be left and picked up. American coffee shops are also often connected with The term indie is short for independent and refers to artistic creations outside the commercial mainstream, without the support of a major record label, major movie studio, or other source of a large budget. For example, independent film indie rock indie radio independent record label This is a disambiguation page... indie, Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. It has been called the first original art form to develop in the United States of America. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African American music... jazz and An acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the Classical guitar, but generally strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. Much heavier construction is required to withstand the added tension. Sometimes the term steel-stringed guitar or folk guitar is used to differentiate from the... acoustic music, and will often have them playing either live or recorded in their shops.


Contemporary Coffeehouses

The current spate of chain coffee shops such as For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck A Starbucks coffee shop in Leeds, England Starbucks (NASDAQ: SBUX) is a large multinational chain of coffee shops, often serving desserts, with a reputation in the US as a center for socializing, particularly among students and young urban professionals. Corporate headquarters... Starbucks and Second Cup is a large Canadian-owned chain of cafés, the largest specialty coffee retailer in Canada. Founded in 1975, the company recently joined with Cara Operations Limited. There are close to 400 Second Cups across Canada. In 2001, Rhéal Mathieu, a member of Front de Libération... Second Cup have a clear lineal descent from the L Espresso Espresso is a strong, flavorful coffee beverage brewed by forcing hot water through finely ground dark-roasted coffee beans. In Italian, espresso means very quickly, and refers to the time it takes to make. The term expresso — used often in the United States, even occasionally on menus... espresso and pastry centered Italian coffeehouses of the An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent. Many, although proud of their heritage, prefer to be referred to simply as American. Although Italians arrived early to the new world, beginning with Christopher Columbus in 1492, and continuing with early explorers John Cabot, Giovanni da Verrazano and Amerigo Vespucci... Italian-American immigrant communities in the major US cities, notably This is an article about New York City; see also NYC, New York, and New York, New York. Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005. New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States and is at... New York City's Mulberry Street looking north from Canal Street, Manhattan, New York City Little Italy is a neighborhood in southern Manhattan, New York City, once known for its population of Italian immigrants. Formerly, the neighborhood included all of Elizabeth, Mott and Mulberry Streets north of Canal Street, together with... Little Italy and Greenwich Village is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. The neighborhood is roughly bounded by Broadway on the east, the Hudson River on the west, Houston Street on the south, and 14th Street on the north. The neighborhoods surrounding it... Greenwich Village, Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. Boston is the capital and largest city in the U.S. State of Massachusetts. It is the unofficial capital of the region known as New England. It... Boston's North End, and This article is about the city in California. For other meanings, see San Francisco (disambiguation). San Francisco skyline. The City and County of San Francisco (population 776,773), the fourth-largest city in the state of California, United States in terms of population, is a consolidated city-county situated at... San Francisco's North Beach. Both Greenwich Village and North Beach were major haunts of the The term beat generation was introduced by Jack Kerouac in approximately 1948 to describe his social circle to the novelist John Clellon Holmes (who published an early novel about the beat generation, titled Go, in 1952, along with a manifesto of sorts in the New York Times Magazine: This is... Beats, who became highly identified with these coffeehouses. As the youth culture of the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. Many of the trends of... 1960s evolved, non-Italians consciously copied these coffeehouses. Before the rise of the Seattle-based Starbucks chain, City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369.2 km² 217.2 km² 152... Seattle (and other parts of the Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. The lighter pink areas around them are sometimes included. The Pacific Northwest (PNW) is an area often defined as northwestern corner of the continental United States. Its boundaries are imprecise: the Pacific coast states of Washington and Oregon are always... Pacific Northwest) had a thriving, largely In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream. In practice, the term is most commonly used to refer to the youth rebellion that swept North America and Western Europe in the 1960s. 1960s... countercultural coffeehouse scene; Starbucks cleaned up, standardized, genericized, and "mainstreamed" this model.


The liquor laws in many areas in the United States generally prevent anyone under the age of 21 from entering bars, so coffeehouses in that country can often be important youth gathering places.


Since approximately the The term beat generation was introduced by Jack Kerouac in approximately 1948 to describe his social circle to the novelist John Clellon Holmes (who published an early novel about the beat generation, titled Go, in 1952, along with a manifesto of sorts in the New York Times Magazine: This is... Beat era, the term coffeehouse has come to imply the availability of espresso drinks, and while "coffee shop" still could suggest an establishment where one would buy coffee, there has been an evolution so that it now suggests This article is about a type of restaurant. For other meanings, see Diner (disambiguation). Diners are an favorite pop-culture memory for many. A diner is a prefabricated restaurant building characteristic of North America. History Diners developed from mobile catering wagons. Like the catering wagon, a diner allowed one to... diner more than coffee-drinking hang-out per se.


Starting in the Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology Bulletin board system popularity Popularization of personal computers, Walkmans, VHS videocassette recorders, and compact disc (CD) players Introduction of the IBM PC Home video games become enormously popular, most notably Atari until the market crashes in 1983; the rise... 1980s, a counter clerk in a coffeehouse has come to be known in English as a Since approximately 1990, the term barista (the Italian word for bartender - masculine or feminine; plural: baristi) has been used in English to denote a professional maker of espresso coffee beverages. Prior to that time, the less elegant prevailing term was espresso puller. The shift of terminology probably comes, at least... barista, from the Italian word for bartender.


The contemporary coffeehouse is just the latest example of a drinking establishment—bars, public houses, taverns and soda shops have also served this purpose—as the center for cultural exchange in a particular community, often fomenting social and political change. See, for example, the meetings of the For the video game, please refer to Metal Gear Solid 2 The Sons of Liberty was an association of Patriots in the United States before the American Revolution. The goal of the Sons of Liberty was to stop enforcement of the 1765 Stamp Act by any means, including violence. As... Sons of Liberty of the Before the Revolution: The 13 colonies are in red, the pink area was claimed by Great Britain after the French and Indian War, and the orange region was claimed by Spain. The American Revolution refers to the series of events, ideas, and changes that resulted in the political separation of... American Revolution and the abortive The Hitler Putsch (also commonly referred to in English as the Beer Hall Putsch) occurred in the evening of Thursday, November 8 to early afternoon of Friday, November 9, 1923 when the nascent Nazi partys Führer Adolf Hitler, the popular World War I General Erich Ludendorff, and other... Beer Hall Putsch by the German The Nazi swastika symbol The National Socialist German Workers Party ( German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. The term Nazi is a short form of the German word... Nazi party in 1923.


Contemporary Cafés

In the United States, café (from the French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. In 1999 French was the 11th most spoken language in the world being spoken by about 77 million people (called Francophones) as a mother tongue, and... French word for Coffee beans and a cup of coffee Coffee as a drink, usually served hot, is prepared from the roasted seeds (beans) of the coffee plant. Coffee bean types Coffea arabica - Brazil There are two main species of the coffee plant; Coffea arabica is the traditional coffee, and considered superior in... coffee) is a small A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. The term covers a multiplicity of venues and a diversity of cuisine styles. Restaurants are sometimes a feature of a larger complex, typically a hotel, where the... restaurant. Styles of cafés vary; some concentrate upon many styles of Coffee beans and a cup of coffee Coffee as a drink, usually served hot, is prepared from the roasted seeds (beans) of the coffee plant. Coffee bean types Coffea arabica - Brazil There are two main species of the coffee plant; Coffea arabica is the traditional coffee, and considered superior in... coffee, This article is about the beverage. For alternative meanings, see tea (disambiguation). A tea bush. Tea drinking in China dates back to before the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Tea is a caffeinated beverage, an infusion made by steeping the dried leaves or buds of the shrub Camellia sinensis in hot... tea, and hot A stack of chocolate pieces, including milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and white chocolate. Chocolate block in melted chocolate Sculptural chocolate in Spain Chocolate is a common ingredient in many kinds of sweets—one of the most popular in the world. Chocolate is made from the fermented, roasted and ground... chocolate, with possibly a selection of Baking is the technique of cooking food in an oven by dry heat applied evenly throughout the oven. The person that does the baking is called a baker. Breads, desserts, and meat (see also roasting) are often baked, and baking is the primary cooking technique used to produce cakes and... baked goods and This article is about the food item. For other uses see: sandwich (disambiguation). Deli Sandwiches The sandwich is a food item consisting of bread and other fillings such as one or more layers of meat (often a type of cold cut), cheese, vegetables, condiments, sauces or other filling. According to... sandwiches, while others offer full menus. American cafés may or may not serve alcoholic beverages, and the serving of coffee may be incidental to the serving of food.


In France, a "café" certainly serves alcoholic beverages. French cafés also often serve simple snacks (sandwiches etc...). They may or may not have a restaurant section. A brasserie is a café that serves meals, generally single dishes, in a more relaxed setting than a restaurant. A "bistro" is a café / restaurant, especially in Paris. Bistro food is supposed to be cheap, but in recent years bistros, especially in Paris, have become increasingly expensive.

Picture of a local coffee shop for coffeehouse article. Taken with a SonyEricsson T630. Its where I got the , actually... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the...
Picture of a local coffee shop for coffeehouse article. Taken with a SonyEricsson T630. Its where I got the , actually... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the... Enlarge
A coffee shop in A true colour image of Ireland, captured by a NASA satellite on January 4, 2003. Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales are visible to the east. Ireland is located west of the European landmass, which is part of the continent of Eurasia. Ireland (Éire in Irish) is the... Ireland. There is no outside seating due to unsuitable weather.

Cafés developed from the coffeehouses that became popular in Europe upon the introduction of coffee. Those also spawned another, completely different type of restaurant, the One of a number of cafeterias at Electronic City campus, Infosys Technologies Ltd., Bangalore, India. The clientele are employees of the company. A cafeteria is a type of restaurant in which there is no table service. Instead, patrons select items that they want, placing them on a tray, and then... cafeteria.


There are two types of cafés: those that specialize in coffee and hot The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids, see Drinking. As a noun, it refers to the liquid thus ingested. It is often used in a narrower sense to refer to alcoholic beverages (as both a verb and a noun). It can also be used metaphorically, as... beverages, and those with a full menu, the most famous examples of which are the "French cafés," especially those in The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Paris.


Cafés, in warmer days, may have an outdoor part (terrace, pavement or For the former Microsoft owned website see: Sidewalk.com. A sidewalk (US English), or pavement or footpath (British English), is a path, usually constructed of concrete (particularly in the United States), asphalt, brick (particularly in Europe) or stone, designed for pedestrian traffic and often running alongside a road. In the... sidewalk café) with seats, tables and parasols. This is especially the case with European cafés. See also One definition of public space or a public place is a place where anyone has a right to come without paying an entrance or other fee. Typical examples are most roads, including the pavement, and public squares and parks. Typical differences between e.g. sitting on a public bench and... public space.


Cafés offer a more open public space to many of the traditional pubs they have replaced, which were more male dominated, with a focus on drinking alcohol. Many people complain that traditional, local venues are being pushed out by cloned, characterless cafes controlled by big business.


The original uses of the cafe, as a place for information exchange and communication was reintroduced in the 1990s with the An Internet cafe or cybercafe is a place where one can use a computer with Internet access for a fee, usually per hour or minute; sometimes one can have unmetered access with a pass for a day or month, etc. It may or may not serve as a regular caf... Internet cafe. The spread of modern style cafes to many places, urban and rural, went hand in hand with computers. Computers and Internet access in contemporary-styled venue is a youthful, modern, outward-looking place, compared to the traditional pubs, or old-fashioned diners that they replaced. In the mid 2000s, of course, many mainstream cafes offer Internet access, just as they offer telephones and newspapers.


Cannabis coffee shops

Some coffee shops, however, especially in the The Netherlands ( Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands ( Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). The Netherlands is a parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarch, located in northwestern Europe. It borders the North Sea to the north and west, Belgium to the south, and Germany to the... Netherlands, are places where selling of Cannabis is a plant also known as Cannabis sativa, hemp, or marijuana. Cannabis sativa discusses the plant as a herb in botany. Cannabis (drug) discusses the pharmacology of the plant products and their use as psychoactive drugs. Medical marijuana discusses the use of the plant as a medicinal drug. Hemp... cannabis for personal consumption by the public are tolerated by the local authorities. Any establishment advertising itself as a "coffeeshop" is likely primarily in the business of selling cannabis products and possibly other substances which are tolerated under the The drug policy of the Netherlands is based on two principles: Drug use is a public health issue, not a criminal matter The distinction between hard drugs and soft drugs It is a pragmatic policy. Most policymakers in the Netherlands believe that if a problem has proved to be unstoppable... drug policy of the Netherlands.


They are called coffee shops because they do not have an In general usage, alcohol (from Arabic al-khwl الكحول, or al-ghawl الغول) refers almost always to ethanol, also known as grain alcohol, and often to any beverage that contains ethanol (see alcoholic beverage). This sense underlies the term alcoholism ( addiction... alcohol serving licence, and most do actually serve coffee. Coffeeshops are strongly controlled by the government, and any shop selling soft drugs to minors, or selling Hard drugs are drugs that lead to physical addiction, opposed to soft drugs, such as marijuana and hashish, that are only psychologically addictive. Cocaine is a well-known hard drug, as are the amphetamines, and all the opiates such as heroin and morphine. According to many, alcohol and nicotine, while... hard drugs at all, is immediately closed.


(In the Netherlands, an outlet called a "koffiehuis", spelt with a k (literally "coffee house") is more similar to what is called a coffee shop in the U.S., whilst a "café" or a "coffeehuis," spelt with a C, is the equivalent of a Categories: Stub ... bar.) Dutch coffee shops often fly This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (Ityopiya, Amharic ኢትዮጵያ) is a country situated in an area known as the Horn of Africa. It has one of the most... Ethiopian flags to indicate that they sell cannabis, as direct advertising of cannabis sale is illegal.


Many municipalities have a coffee shop policy. For some this is a "zero policy", i.e. they do not allow any. Most of such municipalities are either controlled by strict Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. It generally refers to those that separated from the Roman Catholic Church in the Reformation of the 16th century, their offshoots, and those that share similar doctrines or ideologies. It is commonly considered one of the three major branches of Christianity... Protestant parties, or are bordering The Kingdom of Belgium ( Dutch: Koninkrijk België, French: Royaume de Belgique, German: Königreich Belgien) is a country in Western Europe, bordered by the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, France, and the North Sea. Belgium is at a cultural crossroad between Germanic Europe and Romance Europe. It has Dutch speakers... Belgium and The Federal Republic of Germany ( German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the worlds leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe. Due to its central location, Germany has more neighbours than any other European country: these are Denmark in the north, Poland and the Czech Republic in the... Germany and simply do not wish to receive " A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. A tourist is someone who travels at least fifty miles from home, as defined by the World Tourism... drug tourism" from those countries. A March 19, 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. January 3... 2005 article in the Observer noted that the number of Dutch cannabis coffeehouses had dropped from 1,500 to 750 over the previous five years, largely due to pressure from the conservative coalition government [1] (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/archives/2005/03/19/2003246907).


In nearby Denmark (disambiguation). The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. It is located in Scandinavia, which is in northern Europe. Denmark borders the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, and consists of a peninsula attached to Northern Germany named Jutland (Jylland... Denmark it seems that the coffee shops in the Christiania is also the former name of Oslo. A street in Christiania. The red banner is the flag used by the neighborhood. Christiania, also known as the Freetown Christiania, is a partially self-governing neighborhood in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark, which has established semi-legal status as an independent... Freetown Christiania will be abolished in 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. January 3... 2005 or 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. It has been designated: The International Year of Deserts and Desertification Predicted and scheduled events January January 1 - Deadline by which the small remainder of non-metric road distance signs in the Republic of Ireland must be changed... 2006, concluding a social experiment going on for 35 years.


See also

  • List of coffeehouse chains
  • Categories: Stub ... Bar (establishment)
  • One of a number of cafeterias at Electronic City campus, Infosys Technologies Ltd., Bangalore, India. The clientele are employees of the company. A cafeteria is a type of restaurant in which there is no table service. Instead, patrons select items that they want, placing them on a tray, and then... Cafeteria
  • This article is about a type of restaurant. For other meanings, see Diner (disambiguation). Diners are an favorite pop-culture memory for many. A diner is a prefabricated restaurant building characteristic of North America. History Diners developed from mobile catering wagons. Like the catering wagon, a diner allowed one to... Diner
  • Greasy spoon is a colloquial term used in Britain and America for the archetypal working class or truckers café (in England often pronounced caff). The name is used to imply a less than rigorous approach to hygiene and dishwashing, and appears to date from 1925. The term is frequently used... Greasy spoon
  • A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries influenced by British cultural heritage. A pub which offers accommodation may be called an inn or hostelry. In Australia, pubs often bear the name... Public house
  • An Internet cafe or cybercafe is a place where one can use a computer with Internet access for a fee, usually per hour or minute; sometimes one can have unmetered access with a pass for a day or month, etc. It may or may not serve as a regular caf... Internet cafe
  • A manga café or a manga kissa (as it is known in japan) is a kind of café in Japan, where people can read manga. People pay for the time they stay in the café, and sometimes they are also allowed to do various other things such as using the... Manga cafe

External links

  • The internet in a cup (http://www.economist.com/World/europe/displayStory.cfm?story_id=2281736)
  • Persian coffeehouses (http://www.farsinet.com/hottea/coffeehouse.html)
  • Thomas Jordan, "News from the Coffeehouse" (http://www.wwnorton.com/nael/18century/topic_1/coffeehouses.htm)
  • "Coffee: the Wine of Islam" (http://www.superluminal.com/cookbook/essay_coffee.html) Coffee's origins and history in the Sufi world.
  • "Specialty Coffee Retailer" (http://www.specialty-coffee.com) A free source of industry news for the independent coffeeshop owner.
  • Dead Cafe Society Wiki (http://www.dead-cafe-society.org.uk/)

References


 
 

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