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Encyclopedia > Caeneus
Poseidon and Caenis, woodcut illustration of Ovid by Virgil Solis, 1563
Poseidon and Caenis, woodcut illustration of Ovid by Virgil Solis, 1563

In Greek mythology, Caeneus (Ancient Greek Καινεύς or Kaineus) was a Lapith hero and originally a Thessalonian woman, Caenis. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now ConstanÅ£a AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Virgil Solis or Virgilius Solis (Nuremberg 1514 — 1 August 1562), a member of a prolific family of artists, was a German draughtsman and printmaker in engraving, etching and woodcut who worked in Nuremberg. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... In Greek mythology, the Lapiths were a semi-legendary, semi-historical race, whose home was in Thessaly in the valley of the Peneus. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ...


Myth

Caenis, the daughter of Elatus (a Lapith chieftain) and Hippea, was raped by Poseidon, who then fulfilled her request to be changed into a man so that she could never be raped again; he also made Caenis invulnerable to weaponry. Caenis then changed his name to Caeneus and became a warrior, travelling all over Thessaly, and later taking part in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. There were two figures named Elatus or Élatos in Greek mythology. ... Hippeia or Hippea is the name of two characters in Greek mythology. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... The Calydonian Hunt shown on a Roman frieze (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) The Calydonian Boar is one of a genre of chthonic monsters in Greek mythology, each set in a specific locale, which must be overcome by heroes of the Olympian age. ...


He died in the battle between the Lapiths and the centaurs (see Pirithous). In one description of the tale, a particular centaur, Latreus, mocks Caeneus and denies his skill as a fighter when he realizes Caeneus' female origin. Caeneus strikes Latreus a blow in the side, and is unharmed by the centaur's last attempts at wounding him. In revenge for this, the centaurs piled pine-tree trunks (some say fir trees) and stones upon him since he was immune to weapons. In Greek mythology, the centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race of creatures composed of part human and part horse. ... In Greek mythology, Pirithous (also transliterated as Perithoos or Peirithoos) was the King of the Lapiths and husband of Hippodamia. ...

Caeneus fighting with a centaur, Attic lekythos with decoration in superposed colours, ca. 500-490 BC, Louvre (CA 2494)
Caeneus fighting with a centaur, Attic lekythos with decoration in superposed colours, ca. 500-490 BC, Louvre (CA 2494)

There are several descriptions of Caeneus' fate after he had been crushed down by the trunks. One vase, for instance, depicts him as sinking down into the earth, upright, and buried at the waist; this legend is described in the Metamorphoses as well, and implies that Caeneus is falling directly into Tartarus. In that same poem another story is presented, which states that Caeneus flew away from the pile of tree trunks as a tawny-winged bird. (This version of the ending has two witnesses, Mopsus and the "son of Ampycus.") Alternatively, he changed back into a woman after death and was buried as a female. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 558 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1212 × 1302 pixel, file size: 761 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 558 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1212 × 1302 pixel, file size: 761 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In Greek mythology, the centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race of creatures composed of part human and part horse. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Theseus and the Marathonian bull, white-ground lekythos, ca. ... This article is about the museum. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... In classic Greek mythology, below Heaven, Earth, and Hades is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... In Greek mythology, Mopsus was the name of two famous seers: Mopsus, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo Mopsus, a celebrated prophet, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo. ... In Greek mythology, Ampyx was the husband of the nymph Chloris and father of Mopsus. ...


Caenis/Caeneus' legend is found in the Metamorphoses, where he is mentioned briefly as a participant in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. A while after this appearance, Nestor tells the story of Caeneus to Achilles in fuller detail, describing his transformation from male to female, the story of the battle of the centaurs, and Caeneus' eventual mysterious death. // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... The Calydonian Hunt shown on a Roman frieze (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) The Calydonian Boar is one of a genre of chthonic monsters in Greek mythology, each set in a specific locale, which must be overcome by heroes of the Olympian age. ...


Similarly, in the Iliad (without referring to these transformations) Nestor numbers Caeneus among an earlier generation of heroes of his youth, "the strongest men that Earth has bred, the strongest men against the strongest enemies, a savage mountain-dwelling tribe whom they utterly destroyed." No trace of such an oral tradition, which Homer's listeners would have recognized in Nestor's allusion, survived in literary epic. It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ...


Virgil also says that Aeneus sees her/him in the Fields of Mourning as he visits the underworld in Book Six of the Aeneid. Caeneus has by now been turned back by Fate into her original female form. Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... This article needs cleanup. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story...


He was also mentioned in the Catalogue of Women. The Catalogue of Women (Greek: γυναικῶν κατάλογος, gynaikon katalogos) is an epic of ancient Greek literature. ...


Caeneus had one son, Coronus. Coronus is the name of four men in Greek mythology. ...


References

  • Ovid, Metamorphoses VIII, 305; XII, 171-209 & 459-525; Apollodorus, Epitome I, 22; Iliad, I; Virgil, Aeneid VI, 448
  • Ernest Gardner (1897). "Caeneus and the Centaurs: A Vase at Harrow". The Journal of Hellenic Studies 17: 294–305. 

Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... An epitome (Greek epitemnein—to cut short) is a summary or miniature form, also used as a synonym for embodiment. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story...

External links

  • Encyclopaedia Britannica Caeneus
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Caeneus

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Lapith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (718 words)
Caeneus was a well-known Lapith, originally a girl named Cænis and the favourite of Poseidon, who changed her into a man at her request and made her an invulnerable warrior.
Such warrior women, indistinguishable from men, were familiar among the Scythian horsemen too (see the entry "Amazons") and survive among Albanian traditions.
In the Centaur battle, Caeneus proved invulnerable, until the Centaurs simply crushed him with rocks and trunks of trees, he disappeared into the depths of the earth unharmed and was released as a sandy-headed bird.
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