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Encyclopedia > Cadmus
Cadmus Sowing the Dragon's teeth, by Maxfield Parrish, 1908
Cadmus Sowing the Dragon's teeth, by Maxfield Parrish, 1908

Caddmus, or Kadmos (Greek: Κάδμος), in Greek mythology, was the son of the king of Phoenicia (Modern day Lebanon) and brother of Europa. His father is either Agenor, or Phoenix, son of Agenor. Cadmus founded the city of Thebes, and its acropolis was originally named Cadmeia in his honor. Cadmus was credited by the Hellenes with the introduction of the Phoenician alphabet, phoinikeia grammata (Herodotus, Histories V. 58). According to Greek myth, Cadmus' descendants ruled at Thebes on-and-off for several generations, including the time of the Trojan War. For a discussion of the mythical kings of Thebes, see Theban kings - Greek mythology. Cadmus Sowing the Dragons Teeth, 1908 Source: http://mcduffskeep. ... Cadmus Sowing the Dragons Teeth, 1908 Source: http://mcduffskeep. ... The Dinky Bird, by Maxfield Parrish, an illustration from Poems of Childhood by Eugene Field, 1904. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... Phoenician sarcophagus found in Cadiz, Spain; now in Archaeological Museum of Cádiz. ... This article is not about the daughter of Tityus and mother of Euphemus (by Poseidon), who was also named Europa. ... In history and Greek mythology, Agenor (which means very manly) was a king of Tyre. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Phoenix (mythology). ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... Acropolis of Athens from the south-west with the Propylaea and the Temple of Nike (left centre) and the theatre of Herodes Atticus (below left) Acropolis (Gr. ... The Cadmea, or Cadmeia, was the citadel of ancient Thebes, named after the legendary Phoenician founder of Thebes, Cadmus. ... A Specimen of typeset fonts and languages, by William Caslon, letter founder; from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from... The dynastic history of Thebes in Greek mythology is crowded with a bewildering number of kings between the citys foundation (by Cadmus) and the Trojan War. ...

Contents

Legend

After his sister Europa had been carried off by Zeus, Cadmus was sent out to find her. Unsuccessful in his search, he came in the course of his wanderings to Delphi, where he consulted the oracle. He was ordered to give up his quest and follow a special cow, with a half moon on her flank, which would meet him, and to build a town on the spot where she should lie down exhausted. The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Delphi (Greek Δελφοί, [ðe̞lˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ... Aegeus, a mythical king of Athens, consults the Pythia, who sits on a tripod. ...


The cow was given to Cadmus by Pelagon, King of Phocis, and it guided him to Boeotia, where he founded the city of Thebes. Robert Graves (The Greek Myths) suggested that the cow was actually turned loose within a moderately confined space, and that where she lay down, a temple to the moon-goddess (Selene) was erected: "A cow's strategic and commercial sensibilities are not well developed," Graves remarked. There are two figures named Pelagon in Greek mythology. ... Phocis (Greek, Modern: Φωκίδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -s, also Phokida, Phokis) is an ancient district of central Greece. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... Portrait of Robert Graves (circa 1974) by Rab Shiell Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 5 November 1955) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Roman sculpture of the torch-bearing moon goddess Luna, or Diana Lucifera (Diana Bringer of Light), who was equated with the Greek Selene (Vatican Museums) In Greek mythology, Selene (Σελήνη, moon; Modern Greek pronunciation IPA: ) was an archaic lunar deity and the daughter of the titans Hyperion and Theia. ...


Intending to sacrifice the cow to Athena, Cadmus sent some of his companions to the nearby Castalian Spring, for water. They were slain by the spring's guardian water-dragon (compare the Lernaean Hydra), which was in turn destroyed by Cadmus, the duty of a culture hero of the new order. Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... The Castalian Spring in the ravine between the Phaedriades at Delphi is where all comers to Delphi, the contestants in the Pythian Games and especially suppliants who came to consult the Oracle, stopped to wash their hair. ... The 16th-century German illustrator has been influenced by the Beast of Revelation in his depiction of the Hydra. ... A culture hero is a historical or mythological hero who changes the world through invention or discovery. ...


By the instructions of Athena, he sowed the Dragon's teeth in the ground, from which there sprang a race of fierce armed men, called Spartes ("sown"). By throwing a stone among them, Cadmus caused them to fall upon one another until only five survived, who assisted him to build the Cadmeia or citadel of Thebes, and became the founders of the noblest families of that city. In Greek myth, dragons teeth feature prominently in the legends of the Phoenician prince Cadmus and Jasons quest for the Golden Fleece. ... In Greek mythology, the Spartes (sown) were the men who grew from the sowing of dragons teeth. ...


Cadmus, however, because the dragon was sacred to Ares, had to do penance for eight years by serving that god. At the expiration of this period, the gods gave him as wife Harmonia, daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, by whom he had a son Polydorus, and four daughters, Agave, Autonoe, Ino and Semele. In Greek mythology, Ares (in Greek: - Aris (Battle Strife))[1] is the son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. ... In Greek mythology, Harmonia is the goddess of harmony and concord. ... In Greek mythology, Ares (in Greek: - Aris (Battle Strife))[1] is the son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Αφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... In Greek mythology, Polydorus referred to three different people. ... Agave (illustrious) was the queen of Thebes in Greek mythology, mother of Pentheus and daughter of Harmonia and Cadmus. ... In Greek mythology, Semele, daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, was the mother of Dionysus (the god and his votaries were both identified as Bacchus) by Zeus. ...


At the wedding, all the gods were present; Harmonia received as bridal gifts a peplos worked by Athena and a necklace made by Hephaestus. Notwithstanding the divinely ordained nature of his marriage and his kingdom, Cadmus lived to regret both: his family was overtaken by grievous misfortunes, and his city by civil unrest. Cadmus finally abdicated in favor of his grandson Pentheus, and retired with Harmonia to Illyria, whose inhabitants proclaimed him their king. Terracotta of a Greek woman 2. ... Hephaestus, Greek god of forging, riding a Donkey; Greek drinking cup (skyphos) made in the 5th century BC Hephaestus (IPA pronunciation: or ; Greek Hêphaistos) was the Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology including, specifically blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and... Illyria Illyria (disambiguation) Illyria (Anc. ...


Nevertheless, Cadmus was deeply troubled by the ill-fortune which clung to him as a result of his having killed the sacred dragon, and one day he remarked that if the gods were so enamored of the life of a serpent, he might as well wish that life for himself. Immediately he began to grow scales and change in form. Harmonia, seeing the transformation, thereupon begged the gods to share her husband's fate, and she did.(Hyginus)


In a variation of the story, the bodies of Cadmus and his wife were changed after their deaths; the serpents watched their tomb while their souls were translated to the Elysian fields. Elysian Fields may refer to: In mythology: Elysium, a section of the underworld from Greek mythology In geography: Elysian Fields, Hoboken, New Jersey, site of the first organized baseball game Elysian Fields Avenue, New Orleans Avenue des Champs-Élysées, Paris In the arts: Elysian Fields (band), an American Dream...


In the play The Bacchae Cadmus is depicted as being turned into a dragon, or alternatively a serpent, after Dionysius overthrows Thebes. The Bacchae (also known as The Bacchantes) is a tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides. ... Several people in history have been known by the name Dionysius: Dionysius of Syracuse, a tyrant Dionysius the Elder, a Greek mythological figure Dionysius the Areopagite, a citizen of Corinth who was converted by Paul of Tarsus Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, identified by some with a Georgian theologist Peter the...


To this day, some in Greece contend that Cadmus was originally a Boeotian, that is, a Greek hero, and that in later times, the story of a Phoenician immigrant of that name became current, to whom was ascribed the introduction of the alphabet, the invention of agriculture and working in bronze and of civilization generally. But the name itself is Greek; and the fact that Hermes was worshipped in Samothrace under the name of Cadmus or Cadmilus seems to show that the Theban Cadmus was originally an ancestral Theban hero corresponding to the Samothracian. Another Samothracian connection for Cadmus is offered via his wife Harmonia, who is said in some accounts to be daughter of Zeus and Electra and of Samothracian birth. The name Cadmus may mean "order," and may be used to characterize one who introduces order and civilization. Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... A Specimen of typeset fonts and languages, by William Caslon, letter founder; from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Hermes bearing the infant Dionysus, by Praxiteles, found at the Heraion, Olympia, 1877 Hermes (IPA: , Greek IPA: ), in Greek mythology, is the Olympian god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and... Coordinates 40°29′ N 25°31′ E Country Greece Periphery East Macedonia and Thrace Prefecture Evros Population 2,723 source (2001) Area 178. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ...


In Phoenician, as well as Hebrew, the root qdm signifies "the east," the Levantine origin of "Kdm" himself, according to the Greek mythographers. It is readily important to remember, as it comes into revelence often. The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ...


Classical sources

The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ...

Cadmus in popular culture

  • In the Italian sword and sandal film Arrivano i titani (The Arrival of the Titans; 1961; US titles My Son The Hero or The Titans), Cadmus has become a megalomaniac and declared himself a living god. The Titans - most prominently the smartest of them, Crios (Giuliano Gemma) - are released from Hades to confront him and to ensure his punishment.
  • Cadmus is depicted in the act of slaying the dragon on the cover of the Sufjan Stevens album A Sun Came. The song "Oracle Said Wander," a likely reference to the Delphic oracle's message to Cadmus, is on that same album.

DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Project Cadmus is a fictional government genetic engineering project in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superman is a comic book superhero, originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was an American animated television series produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... D. W. Griffith set out to depict the splendor of ancient Babylon in Intolerance. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... Giuliano Gemma (born September 29, 1938) is an italian actor. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Sufjan Stevens (IPA pronunciation: ) (born July 1, 1975) is an American singer-songwriter and musician from Michigan. ... Album by Sufjan Stevens Track Listing We Are What You Say A Winner Needs a Wand Rake Siamese Twins Demetrius Dumb I Sound Wordsmiths Ridge Belly Button Rice Pudding Loverless Bed (Without Remission) Godzuki Super Sexy Woman Oracle Said Wander Happy Birthday Jason Kill Leil Sun Came Satans...

See also

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Cadmus

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Cadmus of Miletus, according to some ancient authorities the oldest of the logographi. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Kerenyi, Karl, 1959. The Heroes of the Greeks

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ...

Further reading

  • R.B. Edwards, Kadmos, the Phoenician (Amsterdam, 1979)

External links

  • Theoi.com
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cadmus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cadmus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (873 words)
Cadmus, or Kadmos (Greek: Κάδμος), in Greek mythology, was the son of the king of Phoenicia and brother of Europa.
Nevertheless, Cadmus was deeply troubled by the ill-fortune which clung to him as a result of his having killed the sacred dragon, and one day he remarked that if the gods were so enamored of the life of a serpent, he might as well wish that life for himself.
To this day, some in Greece contend that Cadmus was originally a Boeotian, that is, a Greek hero, and that in later times, the story of a Phoenician immigrant of that name became current, to whom was ascribed the introduction of the alphabet, the invention of agriculture and working in bronze and of civilization generally.
AllRefer.com - Cadmus (Folklore And Mythology) - Encyclopedia (227 words)
Cadmus, in Greek legend, son of Agenor and founder of Thebes.
Cadmus married Harmonia, daughter of Ares and Aphrodite.
In their old age Cadmus and Harmonia were turned into serpents by Zeus and sent to live in the Elysian fields.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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