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Encyclopedia > Cabaret

Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. The venue itself can also be called a "cabaret." The turn of the 20th century introduced a revolutionized cabaret culture. Performers included Josephine Baker and Brazilian drag performer João Francisco dos Santos (aka Madame Satã). Cabaret performances could range from political satire to light entertainment, each being introduced by a master of ceremonies, or MC. Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... A rand is a relatively short musical composition. ... jus like my ass For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Toms Restaurant, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to order, to be consumed on the premises. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Josephine Baker, c. ... João Francisco dos Santos (1900-1976), also known as the infamous drag performer and capoeirista Madame Satã, was born unto a family of ex- slaves in Brazil. ... Political satire is a subgenre of general satire that specializes in gaining entertainment from politics, politicians and public affairs. ... A Master of Ceremonies or MC (sometimes spelled emcee), sometimes called a compere or an MJ for microphone jockey, is the host of an official public or private staged event or other performance. ...


The term is a French word for the taprooms or cafés where this form of entertainment was born, as a more artistic type of café-chantant. It is derived from Middle Dutch cabret, through Old North French camberette, from Late Latin camera. It essentially means "small room." Café chantant (French: lit. ...


Cabaret also refers to a Mediterranean-style brothel — a bar with tables and women who mingle with and entertain the clientele. Traditionally these establishments can also feature some form of stage entertainment: often singers & dancers — the bawdiness of which varies with the quality of the establishment. It is the classier, more sophisticated cabaret that eventually engendered the type of establishment and art form that is the subject of the remainder of this article.

Contents

French cabaret

There is evidence of cabarets as early as 1789 in the Cahier de Dolences of February 1789 Download high resolution version (894x760, 115 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (894x760, 115 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (November 24, 1864 - September 9, 1901) was a French painter. ... For other uses, see Moulin Rouge (disambiguation). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The first cabaret was opened in 1881 in Montmartre, Paris: Rodolphe Salís' "cabaret artistique." Shortly after it was founded, it was renamed Le Chat Noir (The Black Cat). It became a locale in which up-and-coming cabaret artists could try their new acts in front of their peers before they were acted in front of an audience. The place was a great success, visited by important people of that time such as Alphonse Allais, Jean Richepin, Aristide Bruant, and people from all walks of life: women of high society, tourists, bankers, doctors, journalists, etc. The Chat Noir was a place where they could get away from work. In 1887, the cabaret was closed due to the bad economic situation that made amusements of this kind seem vulgar. Montmartre seen from the centre Georges Pompidou (1897), a painting by Camille Pissarro of the boulevard that led to Montmartre as seen from his hotel room. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896, 135. ... Alphonse Allais (October 20, 1854 - October 28, 1905) was a French writer and humorist, born in Honfleur, Calvados. ... Jean Richepin (February 4, 1849 - December 12, 1926), French poet, novelist and dramatist, the son of an army doctor, was born at Medea (Algeria). ... Aristide Bruant (May 6, 1851 – February 10, 1925) was a French cabaret singer, comedian, and nightclub owner who is best recognized as the man in the red scarf and black cape on the famous posters by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. ...


The Moulin Rouge, built in 1889 in the red-light district of Pigalle near Montmartre, is famous for the large red imitation windmill on its roof. Notable performers at the Moulin Rouge included La Goulue, Yvette Guilbert, Jane Avril, Mistinguett, and Le Pétomane. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec painted numerous pictures and scenes of night life there. For other uses, see Moulin Rouge (disambiguation). ... Pigalle is the name of an area in Paris, France around Place Pigalle (a plaza) on the border between the 9th and the 18th arrondissements, named after the sculptor Jean-Baptiste Pigalle (1714-1785). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Yvette Guilbert, born January 20, 1867 in Paris, France – died February 4, 1944 in Aix-en-Provence, was a music-hall singer and actress. ... Avril by Toulouse-Lautrec Jane Avril (1868-1943), was a French can-can dancer made famous by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec through his paintings. ... Mistinguett (April 5, 1875 - January 5, 1956 from Enghien-les-Bains, Val-dOise, ÃŽle-de-France, France) was a French actress and singer, with birth name of Jeanne Bourgeois. ... Le Pétomane Le Pétomane was the stage name of the French professional farter and entertainer Joseph Pujol (June 1, 1857 - 1945). ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec [äNrÄ“ du tOOlOOz lōtrek] (November 24, 1864 – September 9, 1901) was a French painter, printmaker, draftsman, and illustrator, whose immersion in the decadent and theatrical life of fin de siècle Paris yielded an oeuvre of provocative images of modern life. ...


The Folies-Bergère continued to attract a large number of people until the start of the 20th century, even though it was more expensive than other cabarets. People felt comfortable at the cabaret: They did not have to take off their hat, could talk, eat, and smoke when they wanted to, etc. They did not have to stick to the usual rules of society.



At the Folies-Bergère, as in many cafés-concerts, there were a variety of acts: singers, dancers, jugglers, clowns, and sensations such as the Birmane family, all of whom had beards. Audiences were attracted by the danger of the circus acts (sometimes tamers were killed by their lions), but what happened on stage was not the only entertainment. Often patrons watched others, strolled around, and met friends or prostitutes. At the start of the 20th century, as war approached, prices rose further and the cabaret became a place for the rich.


German-speaking cabaret

Twenty years later, Ernst von Wolzogen founded the first German cabaret, later known as Buntes Theater (colourful theatre). All forms of public criticism were banned by a censor on theatres in the German Empire, however. This was lifted at the end of the First World War, allowing the cabaret artists to deal with social themes and political developments of the time. This meant that German cabaret really began to blossom in the 1920s and 1930s, bringing forth all kinds of new cabaret artists, such as Werner Finck at the Katakombe, Karl Valentin at the Wien-München, and Cläre Waldorf. Some of their texts were written by great literary figures such as Kurt Tucholsky, Erich Kästner, and Klaus Mann. Ernst von Wolzogen (April 23, 1855 - August 30, 1934 was a cultural critic, a writer and a founder of Cabaret in Germany. ... Motto Gott mit Uns (German: God with us”) Anthem Heil dir im Siegerkranz (unofficial) Territory of the German Empire in 1914, prior to World War I Capital Berlin Language(s) Official: German Unofficial minority languages: Danish, French, Frisian, Polish, Sorbian Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1871–1888 William I  - 1888 Frederick... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Werner Finck (May 2, 1902 - July 31, 1978) was a German comedian, an actor with comic bones. He could read the phone book and it would seem extremely funny. ... Karl Valentin (* 4th June, 1882 in Munich; + 9th February, 1948 in Planegg near Munich); actually Valentin Ludwig Fey, was a Bavarian comedian, author and film producer, who had great influence on German culture. ... Kurt Tucholsky Kurt Tucholsky (January 9, 1890 – December 21, 1935) was a German journalist, satirist and writer. ... Erich Kästner (February 23, 1899 - July 29, 1974) is one of the most famous German authors of the 20th century. ... Klaus Mann at 12 years old. ...


When the Nazi party came to power in 1933, they started to repress this intellectual criticism of the times. Cabaret in Germany was hit badly. (Bob Fosse's film, Cabaret (1972), based on the Christopher Isherwood novel, Goodbye to Berlin, deals with this period.) In 1935 Werner Finck was briefly imprisoned and sent to a concentration camp; at the end of that year Kurt Tucholsky committed suicide; and nearly all German-speaking cabaret artists fled into exile in Switzerland, France, Scandinavia, or the USA. The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: , or NSDAP, or commonly, The Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1920 and 1945. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ... Cabaret is a 1972 film. ... Christopher Isherwood (left) and W.H. Auden (right), photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Christopher Isherwood (prior to 1946 Christopher William Bradshaw-Isherwood) (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986), Anglo-American novelist, was born in the ancestral seat of his family, Wybersley Hall, High Lane, in the north west of... Goodbye to Berlin is a short novel by Christopher Isherwood. ... Werner Finck (May 2, 1902 - July 31, 1978) was a German comedian, an actor with comic bones. He could read the phone book and it would seem extremely funny. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe and includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ...


What remained in Germany was a state-controlled cabaret where jokes were told or the people were encouraged to keep their chins up.


When the war ended, the occupying powers ensured that the cabarets portrayed the horrors of the Nazi regime. Soon, various cabarets were also dealing with the government, the Cold War and the Wirtschaftswunder: the Tol(l)leranten in Mainz, the Kom(m)ödchen in Düsseldorf and the Münchner Lach- und Schießgesellschaft in Munich. These were followed in the 1950s by television cabaret. National Socialism redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The term Wirtschaftswunder (English: economic miracle) designates the upturn experienced in the West German and Austrian economies after the Second World War. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... The Kom(m)ödchen is a cabaret stage in Düsseldorf. ... Düsseldorf is the capital city of the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and (together with Cologne and the Ruhr Area) the economic center of Western Germany. ... Munich (German: , pronounced  ; Austro-Bavarian: Minga [1]) is the capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ...


In the DDR, the first state cabaret was opened in 1953, Berlin's Die Distel. It was censored and did not criticise the state (1954: Die Pfeffermühle in Leipzig). Location of Berlin within Germany / EU Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE3 City subdivisions 12 boroughs Governing Mayor Klaus Wowereit (SPD) Governing parties SPD / Left. ...   [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state of Saxony in Germany with a population of over 504,000. ...


In the 1960s, West German cabaret was centred around Düsseldorf, Munich, and Berlin. At the end of the decade, the students' movement of May 1968 split opinion on the genre as some old cabaret artists were booed off the stage for being part of the old establishment. In the 1970s, new forms of cabaret developed, such as the television show Notizen aus der Provinz (Notes from the Sticks). At the end of the 1980s, political cabaret was an important part of social criticism, with a minor boom at the time of German reunification. In eastern Germany, cabarets had been growing more and more daring in their criticism of politicians in the time leading up to 1989. After reunification, new social problems, such as mass unemployment, the privatisation of companies, and rapid changes in society, meant that cabarets rose in number. Dresden, for example, gained two new cabarets alongside the popular Herkuleskeule. Düsseldorf is the capital city of the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and (together with Cologne and the Ruhr Area) the economic center of Western Germany. ... Munich (German: , pronounced  ; Austro-Bavarian: Minga [1]) is the capital of the German Federal State of Bavaria. ... Location of Berlin within Germany / EU Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE3 City subdivisions 12 boroughs Governing Mayor Klaus Wowereit (SPD) Governing parties SPD / Left. ... A May 1968 poster: Be young and shut up, with stereotypical silhouette of General de Gaulle. ... German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) refers to the reunification of Germany from its constituent parts of East Germany and West Germany under a single government on October 3, 1990. ... Dresden (Sorbian: Drježdźany; etymologically from Old Sorbian Drežďany, meaning people of the riverside forest, Czech: ) is the capital city of the German Federal Free State of Saxony. ...


In the 1990s and at the start of the new millennium, the television and film comedy boom and a lessening of public interest in politics meant that television cabaret audiences in Germany dropped.


Famous Kabarettists

Dora Gerson Dora Gerson (March 23, 1899 - February 14, 1943) was a Jewish German cabaret singer and motion picture actress of the silent film era who was notoriously murdered with her family at Auschwitz. ... Karl Farkas (born October 28 1893 in Vienna; died May 16, 1971 in Vienna) was an austrian actor and cabaret performer. ... Werner Finck (May 2, 1902 - July 31, 1978) was a German comedian, an actor with comic bones. He could read the phone book and it would seem extremely funny. ... Erich Kästner (February 23, 1899 - July 29, 1974) is one of the most famous German authors of the 20th century. ... Klaus Mann at 12 years old. ... Jura Soyfer and Maria Szecsi 1938 Jura Soyfer (December 8, 1912. ... Kurt Tucholsky Kurt Tucholsky (January 9, 1890 – December 21, 1935) was a German journalist, satirist and writer. ... Karl Valentin (* 4th June, 1882 in Munich; + 9th February, 1948 in Planegg near Munich); actually Valentin Ludwig Fey, was a Bavarian comedian, author and film producer, who had great influence on German culture. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Alf Poier (born February 22, 1967) is an Austrian artist and stand-up comedian. ... Gerhard Polt (born May 7, 1942 in Munich) is a Bavarian writer, filmmaker, actor and satirical cabaret artist. ...

Dutch-speaking Cabaret

In the Netherlands cabaret is the name for a popular comedy-form that evolved out of the earlier traditional cabaret, much like the German-speaking cabaret. Whereas interest in the German form faded in the 1990s, the Dutch Cabaret stayed strong and actually grew explosively in those years. Unlike Stand-up comedy this Dutch form usually has more of a storyline throughout the performance. Often it is a mixture of comedy with theater and like German-speaking cabaret it can be politically engaged. Famous are the new year's eve performances by Dutch cabaretiers, which are well watched on television. In Belgium, the Flemish Geert Hoste and Raf Coppens have performed these kind of shows as well. Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Flanders (Dutch: ) has several main meanings: the social, cultural and linguistical, scientific and educational, economical and political community of the Flemings; generally called the Flemish community (others refer to this as the Flemish nation) which is, with over 6 million inhabitants, the majority of all Belgians; the constituent governing institution... Geert Hoste (July 1, 1960, Bruges) is a Flemish cabaret performer. ...


Some famous Dutch cabaretiers:

Najib Amhali, born in Morocco, is a well-known celebrity/comedian in Europaen countries like the Netherlands and Holland. ... Freek de Jonge, born 30 August 1944, is a Dutch cabaret performer. ... Herman Finkers Hermenegildus (Herman) Felix Victor Maria Finkers (born December 9, 1954 in Almelo, Overijssel) is a comedian from the Dutch region of Twente, who became famous because of his dry-witted humor and his ambiguous style of storytelling. ... Javier Antonio Guzman (born May 4, 1982 in Samana, Dominican Republic) is a shortstop on the 40-man roster for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... Raoul Heertje (Bussum, 1963) is a Dutch comedian. ... Joseph Jacobus Maria van t Hek, commonly known as Youp van t Hek, (born February 28, 1954 in Naarden) is a Dutch comedian and columnist for NRC Handelsblad. ... Antoine G. T. Toon Hermans (December 17, 1916 - April 22, 2000) was a noted Dutch comedian, singer and writer. ... Theo Maassen (born 8 December 1966 in Oegstgeest, Zuid-Holland) is a Dutch comedian and actor who grew up in Zijtaart in the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant. ... Hans Eduard Marie Teeuwen (March 3, 1967 in Budel, Netherlands) is a Dutch comedian, actor and film director. ...

American Cabaret

In the United States, cabaret diverged into several different and distinct styles of performance mostly due to the influence of Jazz Music. Chicago cabaret focused intensely on the larger band ensembles and reached its zenith in the speakeasies, and steakhouses (like The Palm) of the Prohibition Era. Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... A Speakeasy was an establishment that was used for selling and drinking of alcoholic beverages during the period of U.S. history known as Prohibition, when selling or buying alcohol was illegal. ... A steakhouse (or steak house) is a restaurant that specializes in beef steaks. ... The Palm is a famous steakhouse restaurant located in New York City. ... A scene typical of the Follies of Florenz Ziegfeld, the most popular Broadway impresario of the decade. ...


New York cabaret never developed along the darkly political lines of its European counterparts, but did feature a great deal of social commentary. When New York cabarets featured jazz, they tended to focus on famous vocalists like Eartha Kitt and Capucine (Germaine Lefebvre) rather than instrumental musicians. Capucine (6 January 1931 – 17 March 1990) was a French actress. ... Capucine (January 6, 1931 - March 17, 1990) was a French actress. ...


Cabaret in the United States began to disappear in the sixties, due to the rising popularity of rock concert shows and television variety shows. The art form itself still survives vestigially in two popular entertainment formats: Stand-up comedy and the dark comic performances that may still be seen in the drag show and camp performances in the nation's GLBT community. The term, rock concert, refers to a musical performance in the style of any one of many genres inspired by rock and roll music. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Drag queens Luc DArcy and Jerry Cyr and friend at Montreals 2003 Divers/Cité pride parade. ... For the baseball player Bert Campaneris, see Bert Campaneris For the prestigious bicycle component manufacturer, see Campagnolo The current version of this article or section is written in an informal style and with a personally invested tone. ... LGBT (or GLBT) is an acronym used as a collective term to refer to lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people. ...


Cabaret is currently undergoing a renaissance of sorts in the United States as new generations of performers reinterpret the old forms in both music (see Dark Cabaret below) and theatre. Dark cabaret is a music genre that can be traced back to the 1970s and is still played today. ...


In early 2005 a group of New York City-based musicians and performers, including the actor Ian Buchanan, the rock singer Melissa Auf Der Maur and singer and model Karen Elson launched a series of cabaret performances under the name The Citizens Band. Performing sporadically in downtown Manhattan and in Los Angeles they claim to have political motivation and describe themselves on their website as "a sexy, raucous collaborative cabaret troupe." [1] The Citizens Band received media coverage from the likes of The New Yorker and The New York Times as well as many fashion magazines who trumpeted the return of "cabaret cool" in lush photo spreads. [2] Ian Buchanan, in a still from the opening sequence of All My Children. ... Melissa Gaboriau Auf der Maur (born March 17, 1972) is a Canadian rock musician of Franco-Swiss ancestry, who currently resides in Montreal, Quebec. ... Photograph of the once famous model Dovima A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... Karen Elson (born 14 January 1979 in Bolton, England) is a British supermodel. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...


The Boston band the Dresden Dolls describes their genre of music as "Brechtian Punk" Cabaret. The Dresden Dolls are a two-piece band from Boston that formed mid-2000, made up of singer/pianist Amanda Palmer and drummer (and occasional guitarist) Brian Viglione. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For information on the German author, please see Bertolt Brecht. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ...


Famous cabarets

For other uses, see Moulin Rouge (disambiguation). ... Lapin Agile is a famous Montmartre cabaret, at 22 Rue des Saules, Paris, France. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Cabaret Voltaire was the name of a nightclub in Zürich, Switzerland. ... View of the inner city with the four main churches visible, and the Albis in the backdrop Zürich (German: , Zürich German: Züri , French: , in English generally Zurich, Italian: ) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and conform with our NPOV policy, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Nickname: (Spanish) City of Columns Position of Havana in Cuba Coordinates: Country Cuba Province Ciudad de La Habana Administrative Divisions 15 Founded 1515a Government  - President of the Peoples Power Provincial Assembly Juan Contino Aslán Area  - City 721. ... Blue Angel might be used to refer to several different things: three movies based on Heinrich Manns novel Professor Unrat (1905), about the downfall of a teacher, obsessed with love: The Blue Angel (1930 movie), (in English) starring Marlene Dietrich as Lola, featuring the song Falling in Love Again... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...

See also


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Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance.
Cabaret in Germany was hit badly: In 1935 Werner Finck was briefly imprisoned and sent to a concentration camp; at the end of that year Kurt Tucholsky committed suicide; and nearly all German-speaking cabaret artists fled into exile in Switzerland, France, Scandinavia, or the USA.
Cabaret in the United States began to disappear in the sixties, due to the rising popularity of rock concert shows and television variety shows.
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