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Encyclopedia > Cab Calloway
Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933

Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States' most popular African American big bands from the start of the 1930s through the late 1940s. Calloway's Orchestra featured performers that included trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Adolphus "Doc" Cheatham, saxophonists Ben Webster and Leon "Chu" Berry, New Orleans guitar ace Danny Barker, and bassist Milt Hinton. Calloway continued to perform right up until his death in 1994 at the age of 86. Cab Calloway photographed by Carl Van Vechten, January 12, 1933 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Cab Calloway photographed by Carl Van Vechten, January 12, 1933 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Photographic self-portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Scat singing is vocalizing either wordlessly or with nonsense words and syllables (e. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from 1935 until the late 1940s. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Adolphus Anthony Cheatham, much better known as Doc Cheatham (13 June 1905 - 2 June 1997) was a jazz trumpeter, singer, and bandleader. ... Benjamin Francis Webster (March 27, 1909–September 20, 1973) was an influential American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Leon Chu Berry (1908 - 1941) was an American jazz saxophonist born on September 13, 1908 in Wheeling, West Virginia. ... Danny Barker (1909 - 1994) was a jazz guitarist and banjoist from New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Milt Hinton (born Milton John Hilton in Vicksburg, Mississippi, June 23, 1910; d. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Cab Calloway was born Cabell Calloway III in a middle-class family in Rochester, New York, and raised primarily in Baltimore, Maryland. His father, Cabell Calloway II, was a lawyer, and his mother Martha Eulalia Reed was a teacher and church organist. His parents recognized their son's musical talent, and he began private voice lessons in 1922. He continued to study music and voice throughout his formal schooling. Despite his parents' and vocal teachers' disapproval of jazz, Calloway began frequenting and eventually performing in many of Baltimore's jazz clubs, where he was mentored by drummer Chick Webb and pianist Johnny Jones. Nickname: Motto: Rochester: Made for Living Location of Rochester in New York State Country United States State New York County Monroe Government  - Mayor Robert Duffy Area  - City  37. ... Nickname: Motto: The Greatest City in America,[3] Get in on it. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... William Henry Webb, usually known as Chick Webb (February 10, 1909–June 16, 1939) was a jazz and swing music drummer as well as a band leader. ...


After graduating from high school Cab joined his older sister, Blanche, in a touring production of the popular black musical revue Plantation Days (Blanche Calloway herself would become an accomplished bandleader before her brother did, and Cab would often credit his inspiration to enter show business to her). Cab attended Lincoln University, PA , and left in 1930 without graduating. Jazz singer, bandleader, and composer Blanche Calloway (February 9, 1904 - December 16, 1978) is not as well known as her younger brother Cab Calloway, but she may have been the first woman to lead an all male orchestra. ... Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is a four-year university on 350 acres in southern Chester County and a Center for Graduate Studies in Philadelphia. ...


When the tour ended in Chicago in the fall, Cab decided to remain in Chicago with his sister, who had an established career as a jazz singer in that city. His parents had hopes of their son becoming a lawyer like his father, so Calloway enrolled in Crane College. The Crane School of Music is located in Potsdam, New York, and is one of three schools which make up the State University of New York (SUNY) at Potsdam. ...


His main interest, however, was in singing and entertaining, and he spent most of his nights at the Dreamland Cafe and the Sunset Cafe, performing as a drummer, singer and emcee. A Master of Ceremonies or MC is the host of a staged event or other performance. ...


At the Sunset Cafe he met and performed with Louis Armstrong who taught him to sing in the "scat" style. Louis Daniel Armstrong (4 August 1901[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo, for satchel-mouth, and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ...


Success

The Cotton Club was the premier jazz venue in the country, and Cab Calloway and his Orchestra were hired as a replacement for the Duke Ellington Orchestra while they were touring. (There is some speculation that Mafia pressure was responsible for Cab's hiring.) Calloway quickly proved so popular that his band became the "co-house" band with Ellington's, and Cab and his group began touring nationwide when not playing the Cotton Club. Their popularity was greatly enhanced by the twice-weekly live national radio broadcasts on NBC at the Cotton Club. Calloway also appeared on Walter Winchell's radio program and with Bing Crosby in his show at the Paramount Theatre. As a result of these appearances, Calloway, together with Ellington, broke the major broadcast network color barrier. For the 1984 film of the same name, see The Cotton Club The Cotton Club was a famous night club in New York City that operated during and after Prohibition. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899, Washington, D.C.; d. ... The Mafia (also referred to as Cosa Nostra or the Mob), is a criminal secret society which first developed in the mid-19th century in Sicily. ... NBC (an acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


Unlike many other bands of comparable commercial success, Calloway's gave ample soloing space to its lead members, and, through the varied arrangements of Walter 'Foots' Thomas, provided much more in the way of musical interest. Walter Foots Thomas (b. ...


In 1931, he recorded his most famous song, "Minnie the Moocher". That song, "St. James Infirmary Blues", and "The Old Man Of The Mountain" were performed for the Betty Boop animated shorts Minnie the Moocher, Snow White and The Old Man of the Mountain, respectively. Through the magic of rotoscoping, Cab not only gave his voice to these cartoons but his dance steps as well. Cab took advantage of this and timed his concerts in some communities with the release of the films in order to make the most of the attention. As a result of the success of "Minnie the Moocher" he became identified with its chorus, gaining the nickname "The Hi De Ho Man." In 1943 he appeared in the high-profile 20th Century Fox musical film, Stormy Weather. Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, from the opening credits of Max Fleischers Minnie the Moocher, which included a recording of the titular Calloway song. ... St. ... Betty Boop from the opening title sequence of the earliest entries in the Betty Boop Cartoons Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character appearing in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop series of films produced by Max Fleischer and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Snow White is a 1933 animated short film in the Betty Boop series from Fleischer Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures. ... The Old Man of the Mountain is a 1933 Fleischer Studios animated short starring Betty Boop and Cab Calloway. ... Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the major American film studios. ... Stormy Weather is the title of an American musical motion picture produced and released by 20th Century Fox in 1943. ...


In 1941 Cab Calloway fired Dizzy Gillespie from his Orchestra after an onstage fracas erupted when Calloway was hit with spitballs. He wrongly accused Gillespie, who stabbed Calloway with a surreptitious knife. John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ...


In 1944, The New Cab Calloway's Hepsters Dictionary: Language of Jive was published, an update of an earlier book in which Cab set about translating jive for fans who might not know, for example, that "kicking the gong around" was a reference to smoking opium. Look up Jive in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Jive is Swing music, or a type of quick-paced and energetic jazz. ...


Later years

In the 1950s, Calloway moved his family from Long Island, NY, to Greenburgh, NY to raise the three youngest of his five daughters. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Greenburgh is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ...


In his later career, Calloway became a popular personality, appearing in a number of films and stage productions that utilized both his acting and singing talents. In 1952, he played the prominent role of "Sportin' Life" in a production of the Gershwin opera Porgy and Bess with William Warfield and Leontyne Price as the title characters. Another notable role was "Yeller" in The Cincinnati Kid (1965), with Steve McQueen, Ann-Margret and Edward G. Robinson. George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ... The New Opera in Oslo, Norway The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... Portrait of William Warfield by Carl Van Vechten, Feb. ... Legendary Leontyne Price by Jack Mitchell, 1981 Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American opera singer (soprano). ... The Cincinnati Kid is a 1965 movie directed by Norman Jewison. ... Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Edward Goldenberg Robinson (born Emanuel Goldenberg, Yiddish: עמנואל גולדנברג; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin. ...


In 1967 Calloway co-starred as Horace Vandergelder in an all-black revival of Hello, Dolly! (even though the original production was still running!) starring Pearl Bailey. This was a major success and led to a cast recording released by RCA. In 1973-1974 he was featured in an unsuccessful Broadway revival of The Pajama Game alongside Hal Linden and Barbara McNair. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1994 Cast Recording Hello, Dolly! is one of the most popular Broadway musicals ever written. ... Pearl Bailey in “St. ... RCAs logo as seen today on many products. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Pajama Game is a musical based on the novel 7-1/2 Cents by Richard Bissell. ... Hal Linden (born Harold Lipshitz March 20, 1931) is an American actor and television director, best known for his portrayal of the title character in the television series Barney Miller (1975-1982). ...


1976 saw the release of his autobiography, Of Minnie The Moocher And Me (Crowell). It included his complete Hepsters Dictionary as an appendix.


Calloway attracted renewed interest in 1980 when he appeared as a supporting character in the film The Blues Brothers, performing "Minnie The Moocher", and again when he sang "The Jumpin' Jive" with the Two-Headed Monster on Sesame Street. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The Blues Brothers is a 1980 musical comedy directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as Joliet Jake and Elwood Blues, characters developed from a Saturday Night Live musical sketch. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ...


Calloway helped establish the Cab Calloway Museum at Coppin State College (Baltimore, Maryland) in the 1980s and Bill Cosby helped establish a scholarship in Cab Calloway's name at the New School of Social Research New York City. In 1994, a creative and performing arts school Cab Calloway School of the Arts was dedicated in his name in Wilmington, Delaware. The 1980s refers to the years of and between 1980 and 1989. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ...


In 1986, Calloway appeared at World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE)'s WrestleMania 2 as a guest judge for a boxing match between Rowdy Roddy Piper and Mr. T that took place Nassau Coliseum and in 1990 made a cameo in Janet Jackson's video for "Alright". In the United Kingdom he also appeard in several commericals for the Hula Hoops snack, both as himself and as a voice for a cartoon (in one of these commericals he sang his hit "Minnie The Moocher"). He also made an appearance at the Apollo Theater. World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... WrestleMania 2 was the second annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation (although the first WrestleMania was only on pay-per-view in select areas). ... Roderick George Toombs (born on April 17, 1954 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan), best known by his stage name of Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler of Scottish descent. ... For the animated series, see Mister T (TV series). ... Nassau Coliseum, officially known as Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum (though colloquially referred to simply as The Coliseum), is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Uniondale, New York, half an hour from New York City. ... Janet Damita Jo Jackson (born May 16, 1966) is a Grammy Award-winning, and Academy Award-nominated American singer, songwriter, composer, actress, dancer, choreographer, record producer, and activist. ... Alright was the fourth single by R&B diva Janet Jackson from the album Rhythm Nation 1814. ... Hula Hoops are a potato-based snack product, in the shape of short, hollow cylinders. ...


Death

On November 18, 1994, Calloway died after having suffered a major stroke six months previously. November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... A stroke is a rapidly developing loss of part of brain function or loss of conciousness due to an interruption in the blood supply to all or part of the brain [1]. That is, a stroke involves the sudden loss of neuronal function due to disturbance in cerebral perfusion. ...


In 1998, The Cab Calloway Orchestra (directed by Cab's grandson Christopher Brooks) was formed to "honor" Cab Calloway's legacy on the national and international levels.


Stage appearances

The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1994 Cast Recording Hello, Dolly! is one of the most popular Broadway musicals ever written. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The Pajama Game is a musical based on the novel 7-1/2 Cents by Richard Bissell. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Filmography

Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, from the opening credits of Max Fleischers Minnie the Moocher, which included a recording of the titular Calloway song. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The Big Broadcast is a 1932 film directed by Frank Tuttle, and is the first in the series of Big Broadcast movies. ... Snow White is a 1933 animated short film in the Betty Boop series from Fleischer Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... International House was a comedy film released in 1933, directed by A. Edward Sutherland. ... The Old Man of the Mountain is a 1933 Fleischer Studios animated short starring Betty Boop and Cab Calloway. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Stormy Weather is the title of an American musical motion picture produced and released by 20th Century Fox in 1943. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... The Cincinnati Kid is a 1965 movie directed by Norman Jewison. ... The Blues Brothers is a 1980 musical comedy directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as Joliet Jake and Elwood Blues, characters developed from a Saturday Night Live musical sketch. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Alright was the fourth single by R&B diva Janet Jackson from the album Rhythm Nation 1814. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cab Calloway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1096 words)
Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader.
Calloway was a master of energetic scat singing and led one of the United States' most popular African American big bands from the start of the 1930s through the late 1940s.
Cab Calloway was born Cabell Calloway III in a middle-class family in Rochester, New York, and raised primarily in Baltimore, Maryland.
Cab Calloway Orchestra, directed by C. Calloway Brooks - Official Home (917 words)
Cab Calloway Orchestra appears with famed vocal groups The Ink Spots and the Mills Brothers in Phoenix Az.
The Cab Calloway Orchestra, directed by Cab's grandson, "The Prince of Hi De Ho", C. Calloway Brooks, comes from the Big Band Swing Jazz Orchestra tradition that came bursting out of the Cotton Club, and the Savoy Ballroom, in the Harlem Renaissance during the golden age of radio in the 1930's and 1940's.
The Calloway magic touched many of the greatest Jazz musicians like Dizzy Gillespie, Milton Hinton, The Nicholas Brothers, Illinois Jaquet, Jonah Jones, Cozy Cole, Doc Cheatham, and Ben Webster all of whom emerged from Cab Calloway stints, and went on to redefine Jazz music with spectacular musical careers of their own.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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