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Encyclopedia > CIA World Factbook
Download high resolution version (481x625, 73 KB)Cover of the World Factbook. This image is a map or flag taken and/or modified from the Central Intelligence Agencys World Factbook. Under United States copyright law, all information and images from the World Factbook are public domain. File history Legend...
Download high resolution version (481x625, 73 KB)Cover of the World Factbook. This image is a map or flag taken and/or modified from the Central Intelligence Agencys World Factbook. Under United States copyright law, all information and images from the World Factbook are public domain. File history Legend... Enlarge
World Factbook 2004 cover

The World Factbook is an annual publication by the This article is about the foreign intelligence service of the United States of America. For other uses of the term CIA, see CIA (disambiguation). The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the three American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals... Central Intelligence Agency of the This article is on the country in North America. For other uses, see United States may refer to: The United States of America, a country in North America. The SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. The USS United States, a never-built aircraft carrier. The United Mexican... United States with basic An almanac (sometimes spelled almanack) is an annual publication containing tabular information in a particular field or fields often arranged according to the calendar. Astronomical data and various statistics are also found in almanacs, such as the times of the rising and setting of the sun and moon, eclipses, hours... almanac-style information about the various Lists by country Topical country articles Alphabetical History Politics Subnational entities Culture: see in Culture Transportation Tourism: see in Tourism This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. In order to be listed here as a de... countries of the world. The factbook gives a two- to three-page summary of the Demography is the study of human population dynamics. It encompasses the study of the size, structure and distribution of populations, and how populations change over time due to births, deaths, migration and ageing. Demographic analysis can relate to whole societies or to groups defined by criteria such as education, nationality... demographics, location, Telecommunication is the extension of Communication is the process of exchanging information usually via a common system of symbols. Communication is the academic discipline which studies communication. Contents // 1 Forms of communication 2 Forms and components of human communication 3 Communication technology 4 Communication barriers 5 References 6 See also... telecommunications capacity, A government is an organization that has the power to make and enforce laws for a certain territory. There are several definitions on what exactly constitutes a government. Contents // 1 Definitions 2 Operations 2.1 Territory 2.2 Law enforcement 2.3 Subsidiaries 3 Scale 4 Other meanings 5 See... government, For other uses of this term, see Industry (disambiguation) An industry is an area of economic production which involves large amounts of upfront capital investment before any profit can be realized. The most successful industries in a given sector tend, to be either companies started with a great deal of... industry, Military (from Latin militarius, miles soldier) as an adjective describes anything related to soldiers and warfare, more specifically to do with land forces, the sea forces equivalent being naval. Used as a noun, it is equivalent to Armed force. See also Armed force Martial art Militaria Military history Military rule... military capability, etc, of all Diplomatic recognition is the act in which a states government is formally recognized by another state as being legitimate. In the vast majority of cases, it is not necessary to invoke such recognition. For example, in democratic countries, a government is always regarded as being legitimate when it comes... US-recognized countries and territories in the world.


As The World Factbook is prepared by the CIA for the use of The government of the United States, established by the Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. The national government consists of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The head of the executive branch is the President of the United States. The legislative branch... U.S. Government officials, the style, format, coverage, and content are designed to meet their specific requirements.

Contents

Sources

Information is provided by:

  • Antarctic Information Program ( The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency responsible for supporting basic science research mainly by providing research funding. It operates mainly through the establishment of research grants, particularly to universities or through individual grants (including to professors and graduate students). Contents // 1 History and mission... National Science Foundation),
  • The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. Its mission is defined in the population be enumerated at least once every ten years (through the U.S. Census), and the number of Representatives in Congress determined accordingly. It... Bureau of the Census ( Dept. of Commerce Established: February 14, 1903 Activated: February 18, 1903 Renamed: March 4, 1913 Secretary: Carlos M. Gutierrez Deputy Secretary: Theodore W. Kassinger Budget: $6.2 billion (2004) Employees: 36,000 (2004) Main entrance of U.S. Department of Commerce The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet... Department of Commerce),
  • The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is the unit of the United States Department of Labor which is the principal fact-finding agency for the U.S. government in the field of labor economics and statistics. Statistical reporting Indices and statistics produced by the BLS include: Consumer Price Index Inflation... Bureau of Labor Statistics ( Dept. of Labor Established: March 4, 1913 Activated: March 5, 1913 Secretary: Elaine L. Chao Deputy Secretary: Steven J. Law Budget: $59.7 billion (2004) Employees: 17,347 (2004) The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and... Department of Labor),
  • This article is about the foreign intelligence service of the United States of America. For other uses of the term CIA, see CIA (disambiguation). The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the three American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals... Central Intelligence Agency,
  • Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs,
  • Contents // 1 Overview 2 History 3 See also 4 External links Overview The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), designated in 1986 as a United States Department of Defense combat support intelligence agency was established in 1961. It has over 7,000 military and civilian employees worldwide and is a major producer... Defense Intelligence Agency ( Dept. of Defense Established: July 26, 1947 Activated: September 18, 1947 Renamed: August 10, 1949 Secretary: Donald Rumsfeld Deputy Secretary: Paul Wolfowitz Budget: $375.2 billion (2004) Employees: 700,000 civilian 2.3 million military (2004) The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the... Department of Defense),
  • Dept. of State Larger version Established: July 27, 1789 Renamed: September 15, 1789 Secretary: Condoleezza Rice Deputy Secretary: Robert Zoellick Budget: $9.96 billion (2004) Employees: 30,266 (2004) The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of... US Department of State,
  • The USFWS logo The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is a unit of the United States Department of the Interior that is dedicated to managing and preserving wildlife. It began as the U.S. Commission on Fish and Fisheries in the United States Department of Commerce and the Division... US Fish and Wildlife Service ( Dept. of the Interior Larger version Established: March 3, 1849 Activated: March 8, 1849 Secretary: Gale Norton Deputy Secretary: J. Steven Griles Budget: $10.7 billion (2004) Employees: 71,436 (2004) The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages... Department of the Interior),
  • US Maritime Administration ( Dept. of Transportation Established October 15, 1966 Activated April 1, 1967 Secretary Norman Mineta Deputy Secretary Kirk K. Van Tine (acting) Budget $58.0 billion (2004) Employees 58,622 (2004) The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. It... Department of Transportation),
  • The U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), before 2004 known as the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), was established October 1, 1996, by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency Act of 1996. The creation of NGA (NIMA) followed more than a year of study, debate and planning by... National Imagery and Mapping Agency ( Dept. of Defense Established: July 26, 1947 Activated: September 18, 1947 Renamed: August 10, 1949 Secretary: Donald Rumsfeld Deputy Secretary: Paul Wolfowitz Budget: $375.2 billion (2004) Employees: 700,000 civilian 2.3 million military (2004) The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the... Department of Defense),
  • Naval Facilities Engineering Command ( Dept. of Defense Established: July 26, 1947 Activated: September 18, 1947 Renamed: August 10, 1949 Secretary: Donald Rumsfeld Deputy Secretary: Paul Wolfowitz Budget: $375.2 billion (2004) Employees: 700,000 civilian 2.3 million military (2004) The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the... Department of Defense),
  • The Office of Insular Affairs is a unit of the United States Department of the Interior that manages several United States possessions. Currently, it has administrative responsibility for coordinating federal policy in the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana... Office of Insular Affairs ( Dept. of the Interior Larger version Established: March 3, 1849 Activated: March 8, 1849 Secretary: Gale Norton Deputy Secretary: J. Steven Griles Budget: $10.7 billion (2004) Employees: 71,436 (2004) The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages... Department of the Interior),
  • Office of Naval Intelligence ( Dept. of Defense Established: July 26, 1947 Activated: September 18, 1947 Renamed: August 10, 1949 Secretary: Donald Rumsfeld Deputy Secretary: Paul Wolfowitz Budget: $375.2 billion (2004) Employees: 700,000 civilian 2.3 million military (2004) The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the... Department of Defense),
  • The United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) is a US Federal body whose purpose is to establish and maintain uniform usage of geographic names throughout the Federal Government. The Board was created in 1890; its present form derives from a law of 1947. The Board has developed principles, policies... United States Board on Geographic Names ( Dept. of the Interior Larger version Established: March 3, 1849 Activated: March 8, 1849 Secretary: Gale Norton Deputy Secretary: J. Steven Griles Budget: $10.7 billion (2004) Employees: 71,436 (2004) The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages... Department of the Interior), and
  • other public and private sources.

Copyright

Enlarge
The World Factbook website as it appeared in February 2005

Because the Factbook is The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. (Proprietary interest is typically represented by a copyright or patent.) Such works and inventions are considered part of... public domain, i.e. not under The copyright symbol is used to give notice that a work is covered by copyright. A copyright is a form of intellectual property that grants its holder the sole legal right to copy their works of original expression, such as a literary work, movie, musical work or sound recording, painting... copyright, people are free not only to redistribute it, but also to modify it in any way they like, without permission of the CIA.


The official seal of the CIA, however, may NOT be copied without permission as required by the CIA Act of 1949 (50 U.S.C. section 403m). Misuse of the official seal of the CIA could result in civil and criminal penalties. Also, "Federal law prohibits use of the words "Central Intelligence Agency," the initials "CIA," the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency, or any colorable imitation of such words, initials, or seal in connection with any merchandise, impersonation, solicitation, or commercial activity in a manner reasonably calculated to convey the impression that such use is approved, endorsed, or authorized by the Central Intelligence Agency. [1] (http://www.cia.gov/)"


Many sites have used information and images from the CIA World Factbook, because of its public domain status, including this encyclopedia.


Besides the World Factbook, the CIA puts out a directory of The Chiefs of State and Cabinet Members of Foreign Governments is a weekly directory published by the CIA that lists four types of state officials: the head of state, the chief of the local central bank, the UN and American ambassadors from the country listed, and numerous officials who hold... Chiefs of State and Cabinet Members of Foreign Governments each week.


Oddities and controversies

Factual

Controversy about the Factbook arose in 1998 is a This is the calendar for any common year starting on Thursday (dominical letter D). (A common year is a year with 365 days -- in other words, not a leap year.) January February March Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa... 1998 when The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a This article describes a type of political entity. Country is also a short form for the Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. Such areas are distinct from more intensively settled... British journalists noticed it contained some glaring errors — most notably that "the The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a This article describes a type of political entity. Country is also a short form for the Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. Such areas are distinct from more intensively settled... United Kingdom gained its independence in Years: 1798 1799 1800 - 1801 - 1802 1803 1804 Decades: 1770s 1780s 1790s - 1800s - 1810s 1820s 1830s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1801 in art 1801 in literature 1801 in music 1801 in science 1801 in sports List of state leaders in 1801 List of religious leaders in 1801... 1801".


The maps of countries in the Factbook also appear to have strange anomalies. For example, the map of the United Kingdom lists the town of Grangemouth is a burgh in the region of Falkirk, Scotland, on the River Forth. It is known for its large petrochemical plant. Population 18,500. Twinned with La Porte, Indiana Categories: Stub ... Grangemouth in For other uses, see Scotland (disambiguation). Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. Scotland has a land boundary with England in the island of Great Britain and is otherwise bounded... Scotland, although it is only a small town and in no way a major city (this is perhaps due to its status as a major centre of the oil industry in Scotland).


Political

The U.S. does not recognize the renaming of Burma by its ruling military junta to The Union of Myanmar, also known as Burma, is a country in Southeast Asia. The country has been ruled by a military government since a coup in 1988. The country is a developing nation. It has a population of approximately forty-three million Pyidaungzu Myanmar Naingngandaw (In Detail) (Full size... Myanmar and thus keeps its entry for the country under "Burma."


Specific regions within a country or areas in dispute among countries, such as For other uses, see Kashmir (disambiguation). Map of Kashmir showing the Line of Control and disputed areas Market boats on Mar Canal, Srinigar by E. Molyneux, c. 1908 Kashmir is a region in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. The term Kashmir historically described the valley just to the... Kashmir and For other uses, see Kosovo or Kosova is a widely used place name in Slavic countries, stemming from the word kos, which means blackbird. Contents // 1 Kosovo 2 Kosova 3 Kos- Kosovo Kosovo is casual name for Kosovo and Metohija, an autonomous province of Serbia. Kosovo is a region in... Kosovo, are not covered, but other areas of the world whose status is disputed, such as the The Spratly Islands (Chinese: 南沙群島, in pinyin: Nānshā Qúndāo “Southern sands” (also Nansha Islands); Vietnamese: Trường Sa “Long Sands”; Filipino: Kalayaan Independence) are a disputed group of approximately 100 reefs and islets in the... Spratly Islands, have entries.


Maps depicting Kashmir have the India-Pakistan border drawn at the The line of control (LOC) is a line which demarcates the boundary between the territories controlled by two militaries or political entities, e.g. the ones in Western Kashmir and the Aksai Chin — where it is known as the Line of Actual Control (LAC). See also Demilitarized zone Green... Line of Control, but the region of Kashmir occupied by China drawn in hashmarks.


The occupied The Golan Heights, previously known as the Syrian Heights, is a plateau on the border of Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria. Israel captured the land from Syria during the Six-Day War and still occupies it. Neither the UN or any country has recognised this annexation and the United Nations... Golan Heights, Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. The Gaza Strip is a narrow strip of land just northeast of the Sinai Peninsula. At the end of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War it was occupied by the Egyptians, under which it remained until it was claimed by Israel during... Gaza Strip, the The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please help by reporting disputed passages and terms on the talk page. The West Bank is a territory in the Middle East constituting the area west of the Jordan River annexed by Jordan at the end of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. The... West Bank are not shown as part of Israel.


The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus(TRNC) {NOTE: the name is not accepted by UN} , in Turkish Kuzey Kıbrıs Türk Cumhuriyeti, is a self-proclaimed state occupying the northern third of the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean. Not counting Azerbaijans Nakhchivan Autonomous... Northern Cyprus is not given a separate entry or listed as part of Turkey because "territorial occupations/annexations not recognized by the United States Government are not shown on U.S. Government maps."


For the political entity commonly known as Taiwan, see Republic of China. Map of Taiwan The island of Taiwan (Traditional: 臺灣, Simplified: 台湾, Pinyin: Táiwān, Wade-Giles: Tai-wan, Taiwanese: Tâi-oân) is located off the coast of mainland China in the... Taiwan has a separate entry not listed under "T", but at the bottom of the list. The name " The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a state that currently administers the island groups of Taiwan, the Pescadores, Quemoy, and the... Republic of China" is not listed as Taiwan's "official name" under the "Government" section, perhaps due to U.S. recognition of Beijing's The One-China policy (Chinese: 一個中國) is the principle that there is one China and both mainland China and Taiwan are part of that China. The acknowlegement of this policy relates to the political status of Taiwan and has been an obstacle in relations between the People... One-China Policy according to which the Republic of China is a defunct entity having been replaced by the The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) comprises most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as This article is on the geographic and cultural entity. For other meanings, see ... China (disambiguation). ... ... The The Great Wall of China (TC: 長城; SC: 长城, Pinyin: Chángchéng), also... People's Republic of China. The name "Republic of China" was briefly added on January 27, 2005 but changed back to "none" on February 10, 2005.


On December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 15 days remaining. December Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... December 16, 2004 is a This is a calendar for any leap year starting on Thursday (dominical letter DC), e.g. 2004. January February March Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 1 2 3... 2004, the CIA added an entry for the The European Union or EU is an Intergovernmentalism is a method of decision-making in international organizations, where power is possessed by the member-states and decisions are made by unanimity. Independent appointees of the governments or elected representatives have solely advisory or implementational functions. Intergovernmentalism is used by most... European Union. According to the CIA, the European Union was added because the EU "continues to accrue more nation-like characteristics for itself".


See also

  • This is a list of abbreviations used in the CIA World Factbook. Many country articles are ported from the CIA World Factbook. Please dont disambiguate the abbreviations in this list, as its to serve as a help for disambiguating abbreviations in these articles. Current version: http://www.cia... Abbreviations used in CIA World Factbook

External links

  • World Factbook Website (http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/)
  • 2004 CIA World Factbook (http://www.memoware.com/?screen=doc_detail&doc_id=15510&back=main) for A Pocket PC is a computer in a handheld size that runs a variation of the operating system Windows CE. It has many capabilities of modern desktop PCs. Currently there are thousands of applications for Pocket PC, many free. Some of these devices, running Microsoft Windows Mobile 2003 Phone Edition... Pocket PC and Palm OS is an operating system made by PalmSource, Inc. for personal digital assistants (PDAs) manufactured by various licensees. Contents // 1 History 2 Built-in applications for Palm OS 2.1 Address 2.2 Calculator 2.3 Date Book 2.4 Expense 2.5 HotSync 2.6 Memo Pad 2... Palm OS devices
  • Nationmaster.com (http://www.nationmaster.com): statistics with bars, based on the Factbook
  • Authorama CIA World Factbook (http://www.authorama.com): The complete Factbook as XHTML1.0 (easily readable, no images, device-independent)

  Results from FactBites:
 
CIA World Factbook (hires, color, b&w and text only, 10 versions) eBook (443 words)
This edition of the CIA's World Factbook (updated 27 January 2005) is intended for monochrome lo-res PDA's with a screen resolution of 160x160 (e.g.
This edition of the CIA's World Factbook (updated 27 January 2005) is intended for hi-res PDA's with a screen resolution of 320x480 (e.g.
This edition of the CIA's World Factbook (updated 27 January 2005) is intended for lo-res color PDA's with a screen resolution of 160x160 (e.g.
The World Factbook Information (1338 words)
The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world.
As The World Factbook is prepared by the CIA for the use of U.S. government officials, the style, format, coverage and content are primarily designed to meet their specific requirements.
The Factbook's house style for spelling defers to the United States Board on Geographic Names and the CIA itself; as a consequence the head of Al-Qaeda is referred to as Bin Ladin [11] and the ruler of Libya is referred to as Qadhafi.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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