FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "C" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


EncyclopediaC > 1882-R1
Look up C, c in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
C
Basic Latin alphabet
  Aa Bb Cc Dd  
Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj
Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp
Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv
  Ww Xx Yy Zz  
C in copyright mark
C in copyright mark
This article is about the letter. For other uses, see C (disambiguation).
For technical reasons, C# redirects here. For the programming language, see C Sharp

C is the third letter in the Latin alphabet. Its name in English is spelled cee or occasionally ce (IPA: /siː/).[1] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Image File history File links Latin_alphabet_Cc. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... For other uses of A, see A (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see D (disambiguation). ... Look up E, e in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up F, f in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see G (disambiguation). ... Look up H, h in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up I, i in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see J (disambiguation). ... Look up K, k in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see L (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see M (disambiguation). ... Look up N, n in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up O, o in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Latin alphabet letter. ... Look up Q, q in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up R, r in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up S, s in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see T (disambiguation). ... For other uses of U, see U (disambiguation). ... Look up V, v in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up W, w in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see X (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Z, z in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Copyright. ... Image File history File links Copyright. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ... Look up C, c in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... A Specimen of typeset fonts and languages, by William Caslon, letter founder; from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Contents

History

Hebrew
gimel
Phoenician
gimel
Classical Greek
Gamma
Early Latin
C
Late Latin
C
Phoenician gimel Classical Greek Gamma Early Latin

C comes from the same letter as G or g. The Semites named it gimel. The sign is possibly adapted from an Egyptian hieroglyph for a staff sling, which may have been the meaning of the name gimel. Another possibility is that it depicted a camel, the Semitic name for which was gamal. Image File history File links Gimel. ... Image File history File links Phoenician_G.svg Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Classical Greek: Gamma Drawn by User:Munchkinguy after drawings in Groiler Multimedia Encyclopedia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Capital_C.svg A capital letter C. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Semitic is an adjective which in common parlance mistakenly refers specifically to Jewish things, while the term actually refers to things originating among speakers of Semitic languages or people descended from them, and in a linguistic context to the northeastern subfamily of Afro-Asiatic. ... Gimel is the third letter of many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew , Syriac and Arabic (in abjadi order; 5th in higai order). ... A section of the Papyrus of Ani showing cursive hieroglyphs. ... Home-made sling. ...


In the Etruscan language, plosive consonants had no contrastive voicing, so the Greek Γ (Gamma) was adopted into the Etruscan alphabet to represent the /k/ phoneme. Already in the Western Greek alphabet, Gamma first took a form in Early Etruscan, then in Classical Etruscan. In Early Latin it took a form then C in Classical Latin. Early Latin used C for both /k/ and /g/, but during the 3rd century BC, a modified character, was introduced for /g/, and C itself retained for /k/. Hence, in the classical period and after, G was treated as the phonetic representative of "gamma", and C as the equivalent of "kappa", in the transliteration of Greek words into Roman spelling, as in "KA∆MOΣ, KYPOΣ, ΦΩKIΣ," in Roman letters "CADMVS, CYRVS, PHOCIS". It is also possible but uncertain that C represented only /g/ at a very early time, while K might have been used for /k/. Languages in Iron Age Italy, 6th century BC Etruscan was a language spoken and written in the ancient region of Etruria (current Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of what are now Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls), in Italy. ... A stop or plosive or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... In phonetics, phonation is the use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... Gamma (uppercase Γ, lowercase γ) is the third letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Old Italic refers to a number of related historical alphabets used on the Italian peninsula which were used for some non-Indo-European languages (Etruscan and probably North Picene), various Indo-European languages belonging to the Italic branch (Faliscan and members of the Sabellian group, including Oscan, Umbrian, and South... It has been suggested that Cumae alphabet be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Early_Etruscan_C.gif‎ Early Etruscan c drawn by Primetime. ... Image File history File links Classical_Etruscan_C.gif Summary Classical Etruscan c drawn by Primetime. ... Phonetic (pho-NET-ic) is a nationwide voicemail-to-text messaging service available for most digital mobile phones in which a subscriber is provided a custom voice mailbox for the purpose of receiving all incoming voice messages as actual transcribed text for reading via short messaging (also known as SMS... Look up K, k in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Other alphabets have letters identical to C in form but not in use and derivation, in particular the Cyrillic letter Es which derives from one form of the Greek letter sigma, known as the "lunate sigma" from its resemblance to a crescent moon. The Cyrillic alphabet (pronounced also called azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is actually a family of alphabets, subsets of which are used by certain Slavic languages — Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian—as well as many other languages of the former Soviet Union... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Sigma (upper case Σ, lower case σ, alternative ς) is the 18th letter of the Greek alphabet. ...


Later use

When the Roman alphabet was introduced into Britain, C represented only /k/ and this value of the letter has been retained in loanwords to all the insular Celtic languages: in Welsh, Irish, Gaelic, C, c, is still only /k/. The Old English or "Anglo-Saxon" writing was learned from the Celts, apparently of Ireland; hence C, c, in Old English, also originally represented /k/: the words kin, break, broken, thick, seek, were in Old English written cyn, brecan, brocen, Þicc, séoc. But during the course of the Old English period, /k/ before front vowels (/e/ and /i/) was palatalized, having, by the 10th century, advanced nearly or quite to the sound of /tʃ/, though still written c, as in cir(i)ce, wrecc(e)a. On the continent, meanwhile, a similar phonetic change had also been going on (for example, in Italian). The Insular Celtic hypothesis concerns the origin of the Celtic languages. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Palatalization means pronouncing a sound nearer to the hard palate, making it more like a palatal consonant; this is towards the front of the mouth for a velar or uvular consonant, but towards the back of the mouth for a front (e. ...


Original Latin /k/ before front vowels had palatalized in Italy to the sound of /tʃ/, and in France and the Iberian peninsula to that of /ts/. Yet for these new sounds the old character C, c, was still retained before e and i, the letter thus represented two distinct values. Moreover the Latin phoneme /kʷ/ (represented by QV, or qu) de-labialized to /k/ meaning that the various Romance languages had /k/ before front vowels. In addition, Norman French used the Greek letter K, so that the sound /k/ could be represented by either k or c, the latter of which could represent either /k/ or /ts/. These French inconsistencies as to C and K were, after the Norman Conquest, applied to the writing of English, which caused a considerable re-spelling of the Old English words. Thus while Old English candel, clif, corn, crop, cú, remained unchanged, Cent, cæ´ Image:Insular G.GIF (cé´ Image:Insular G.GIF), cyng, brece, séoce, were now (without any change of sound) spelt Kent, keȝ, kyng, breke, seoke; even cniht was subsequently spelt kniht, knight, and þic, þicc, became thik, thikk, thick. The Old English cw- was also at length (very unnecessarily) displaced by the French qw, qu, so that the Old English cwén, cwic, became Middle English qwen, quen, qwik, quik, now queen, quick. The sound /tʃ/ to which Old English palatalized c had advanced, also occurred in French, chiefly (in Central French) from Latin c before a. In French it was represented by ch, as in champ, cher:–Latin camp-um, caōr-um; and this spelling was now introduced into English: the Hatton Gospels, written about 1160, have in Matt. i-iii, child, chyld, riche, mychel, for the cild, rice, mycel, of the Old English version whence they were copied. In these cases, the Old English c gave place to k, qu, ch; but, on the other hand, c in its new value of /ts/ came in largely in French words like processiun, emperice, grace, and was also substituted for ts in a few Old English words, as miltse, bletsien, in early Middle English milce, blecien. By the end of the 13th century both in France and England, this sound /ts/ de-affricated to /s/; and from that date c before front vowels has been, phonetically, a duplicate or subsidiary letter to s; used either for etymological reasons, as in lance, cent, or (in defiance of etymology) to avoid the ambiguity due to the "etymological" use of s for /z/, as in ace, mice, once, pence, defence. The Norman language is a Romance language, one of the Oïl languages. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Image File history File links Insular_G.GIF Summary An insular g drawn by Primetime. ... Image File history File links Insular_G.GIF Summary An insular g drawn by Primetime. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ...


Thus, to show the etymology, English spelling has advise, devise, instead of advize, devize, which while advice, device, dice, ice, mice, twice, etc., do not reflect etymology; example has extended this to hence, pence, defence, etc., where there is no etymological necessity for c. Former generations also wrote sence for sense.


Hence, today the Romance languages and English have a common feature inherited from Vulgar Latin where C takes on either a "hard" or "soft" value depending on the following vowel. In English and French, C takes the "hard" value /k/ finally and before A, O, and U, and the "soft" value /s/ before Æ, E, I, Œ or Y. However, as with everything else regarding English spelling, there are a couple of exceptions: "soccer" and "Celt" are words that have a k sound in the "wrong" place. The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Vulgar Latin, as in this political graffito at Pompeii, was the speech of ordinary people of the Roman Empire — different from the classical Latin used by the Roman elite. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The pronunciation of the words Celt and Celtic in their various meanings has been surrounded by some confusion: the initial, <c> can be realised either as /k/ or as /s/. Both can be justified philologically and both are correct in terms of English prescriptive usage. ...


Romance languages obey similar rules, but the soft value is different in several languages, such as a voiceless dental fricative /θ/ in Castilian Spanish and /ʧ/ in Italian and Romanian. The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... The voiceless dental non-sibilant fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. ...


Other languages use C with different values, such as /ð/ in Fijian; /ʕ/ in Somali; the click /ǀ/ in Xhosa and Zulu; /ʤ/ in Turkish, Tatar, and Azeri; /ʧ/ in Indonesian, Malay, and a number of African languages such as Hausa, Fula, and Manding; /ʦ/ in all Balto-Slavic languages that use the Latin alphabet, as well as Albanian, Esperanto, Hungarian, Ido, and Interlingua; and /ʦʰ/ in Romanized Chinese. It is also used as a transliteration of the Cyrillic "Ц" in the Latinic forms of Serbian, Macedonian, and Ukrainian. For the Xhosa people, see Xhosa. ... Zulu (called isiZulu in Zulu), is a language of the Zulu people with about 10 million speakers, the vast majority (over 95%) of whom live in South Africa. ... The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça, Татар теле, Татарча) is a Turkic language spoken by the Tatars. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ... Hausa is the Chadic language with the largest number of speakers, spoken as a first language by about 24 million people, and as a second language by about 15 million more. ... The Fula language is a language of West Africa, spoken by the Fula people from Senegal to Cameroon and Sudan. ... Mande (or Manding) is the name of a group of languages which are spoken in several countries in West Africa, including Mandinka and Bambara. ... The hypothetical Balto-Slavic language group consists of the Baltic and Slavic language subgroups of the Indo-European family. ... This article is about the language. ... Ido (pronounced ) is a constructed language created with the goal of becoming a universal second language for speakers of different linguistic backgrounds as a language easier to learn than ethnic languages. ... This article is about the auxiliary language created by the International Auxiliary Language Association. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... The Serbian language is one of the standard versions of the Å tokavian dialect (former standard was known as Serbo-Croatian language). ...


There are several common digraphs with C, the most common being CH, which in some languages such as German is far more common than C alone. In English, CH most commonly takes the value /ʧ/ (which it invariably has in Spanish), but can take the value /k/ or /ʃ/; some dialects of English also have /x/ in words like loch where other speakers pronounce the final sound as /k/. CH takes various values in other languages, such as /x/ in all Slavic languages using the Latin alphabet;/ç/, /k/, or /x/ in German; /x/ or silent in Dutch; /ʃ/ in French and Portuguese; /k/ in Interlingua and Italian, /ʈʂʰ/ in Mandarin Chinese; and so forth. CK, with the value /k/, is often used after short vowels in Germanic languages such as English, German and Swedish (but some other Germanic languages use KK instead, such as Dutch and Norwegian). The digraph CZ is found in Polish and CS in Hungarian, both representing /ʧ/. In Old English, Italian, and a few languages related to Italian, sc represents /ʃ/ (however in Italian and related languages this only happens before e or i, otherwise it represents /sk/). Ch is a digraph in the Roman alphabet. ... This article is on all of the Northern Chinese dialects. ... The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ...


As a phonetic symbol, lowercase c is the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and X-SAMPA symbol for the voiceless palatal plosive, and capital C is the X-SAMPA symbol for the voiceless palatal fricative. Phonetic (pho-NET-ic) is a nationwide voicemail-to-text messaging service available for most digital mobile phones in which a subscriber is provided a custom voice mailbox for the purpose of receiving all incoming voice messages as actual transcribed text for reading via short messaging (also known as SMS... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The voiceless palatal fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ...


Various codes for computing

In Unicode the capital C is codepoint U+0043 and the lowercase c is U+0063. FAA radiotelephony phonetic alphabet and Morse code chart. ... 1922 Chart of the Morse Code Letters and Numerals Morse code is a method for transmitting telegraphic information, using standardized sequences of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a message. ... Image File history File links ICS_Charlie. ... Image File history File links Semaphore_Charlie. ... Image File history File links Sign_language_C.svg‎ Sign language – letter C. Based on the Gallaudet font. ... Image File history File links Braille_C3. ... The system of international maritime signal flags is a way of representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Sign Language Alphabet is a manual alphabet that augments the vocabulary of American Sign Language when spelling individual letters of a word is the preferred or only option, such as with proper names or the titles of works. ... Braille code where the word (, French for first) can be read. ... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... Majuscules or capital letters (in the Roman alphabet: A, B, C, ...) are one type of case in a writing system. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Letter case. ...


The ASCII code for capital C is 67 and for lowercase c is 99; or in binary 01000011 and 01100011, respectively. Image:ASCII fullsvg There are 95 printable ASCII characters, numbered 32 to 126. ... The binary numeral system, or base-2 number system, is a numeral system that represents numeric values using two symbols, usually 0 and 1. ...


The EBCDIC code for capital C is 195 and for lowercase c is 131. EBCDIC (Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code) is an 8-bit character encoding (code page) used on IBM mainframe operating systems, like z/OS, OS/390, VM and VSE, as well as IBM minicomputer operating systems like OS/400 and i5/OS. It is also employed on various non-IBM...


The numeric character references in HTML and XML are "&#67;" and "&#99;" for upper and lower case respectively. A numeric character reference (NCR) is a common markup construct used in SGML and other SGML-based markup languages such as HTML and XML. It consists of a short sequence of characters that, in turn, represent a single character from the Universal Character Set (UCS) of Unicode. ... HTML, short for Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ...


Meanings of C

See C (disambiguation).

Look up C, c in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • ¢ (cent)
  • Ç (cedilla)
  • Ĉ (C circumflex)
  • Č (C caron)
  • Ć (C acute)
  • Cyrillic C
  • Ċ (C dot above)
  • Ƈ (C hook)
  • ʗ (stretched C)
  • (C acute cedilla)
  • (colon currency symbol)
  • (cruzeiro currency symbol)
  • (double-struck C)
  • ℃ (degree Celsius)
  • (Gothic C)
  • (Roman number C)
The ISO basic Latin alphabet
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
Letter C with diacritics
ĆćĈĉČčĊċÇçḈḉȻȼƇƈɕ
Two-letter combinations
Ca Cb Cc Cd Ce Cf Cg Ch Ci Cj Ck Cl Cm Cn Co Cp Cq Cr Cs Ct Cu Cv Cw Cx Cy Cz
CA CB CC CD CE CF CG CH CI CJ CK CL CM CN CO CP CQ CR CS CT CU CV CW CX CY CZ
Letter-digit & Digit-letter combinations
                C0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9
                0C 1C 2C 3C 4C 5C 6C 7C 8C 9C
historypalaeographyderivationsdiacriticspunctuationnumeralsUnicodelist of letters

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... A cedilla is a hook (¸) added under certain consonant letters as a diacritic mark to modify their pronunciation. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... ÄŒ in upper- and lowercase ÄŒ is the fourth letter of the Bosnian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak and Slovenian alphabet and the fifth letter of the Lithuanian and Latvian alphabet. ... The acute accent ( Â´ ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin script. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... When used as a diacritic mark, the term dot is usually reserved for the middle dot ·, or to the glyphs combining dot above ̇ and combining dot below Ì£ which may be combined with some letters of the extended Latin alphabets in use in Eastern European languages and Vietnamese. ... (minuscule: ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from C with the addition of a hook. ... Stretched C () is a letter of the Latin alphabet used to represent a kind of click consonant. ... The colón is the currency of two Central American nations: Costa Rica (ISO 4217 three-letter currency code: CRC); see Costa Rican colón El Salvador (ISO 4217: SVC) – since 2001 used in parallel with the United States dollar; see dollarization, El Salvadoran colón The Costa Rican col... The cruzeiro (Cr$) was the monetary unit of Brazil from 1942 to 1986 and again between 1990 and 1993. ... In mathematics, a complex number is an expression of the form a + bi, where a and b are real numbers, and i stands for the square root of minus one (−1), which cannot be represented by any real number. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Due to technical limitations, C# redirects here. ... 100 (one hundred) (the Roman numeral is C for centum) is the natural number following 99 and preceding 101. ... ISO 646 is an ISO standard that specifies a 7-bit character code from which several national standards are derived, the best known of which is ASCII. Since the portion of ISO 646 shared by all countries specified only the letters used in the English alphabet, other countries using the... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... For other uses of A, see A (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see D (disambiguation). ... Look up E, e in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up F, f in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see G (disambiguation). ... Look up H, h in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up I, i in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see J (disambiguation). ... Look up K, k in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see L (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see M (disambiguation). ... Look up N, n in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up O, o in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Latin alphabet letter. ... Look up Q, q in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up R, r in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up S, s in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see T (disambiguation). ... For other uses of U, see U (disambiguation). ... Look up V, v in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up W, w in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see X (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Z, z in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ... The acute accent ( Â´ ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin script. ... Ĉ or ĉ (C circumflex) is a consonant in Esperanto orthography, representing a voiceless postalveolar affricate (either palato-alveolar or retroflex), and is equivalent to or in the IPA. Esperanto orthography uses a diacritic for all four of its postalveolar consonants, as do the Latin-based Slavic alphabets. ... ÄŒ in upper- and lowercase ÄŒ is the fourth letter of the Bosnian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak and Slovenian alphabet and the fifth letter of the Lithuanian and Latvian alphabet. ... When used as a diacritic mark, the term dot is usually reserved for the middle dot ·, or to the glyphs combining dot above ̇ and combining dot below Ì£ which may be combined with some letters of the extended Latin alphabets in use in Eastern European languages and Vietnamese. ... A cedilla is a hook (¸) added under certain consonant letters as a diacritic mark to modify their pronunciation. ... The letter (minuscule: ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet based on the cent sign. ... (minuscule: ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from C with the addition of a hook. ... The voiceless alveolo-palatal fricative or laminal postalveolar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... CA or ca may stand for: C&A stores calcium (Ca): symbol for the chemical element California: State of, United States Canada (ISO country code) Catalan language (ISO 639 alpha-2) Cellular automata Central America Certificate authority Channel America: Defunct US television network Chartered accountant Chemical Abstract Citizens Alliance: Political... CB (or derivative) may be: Cowboy Bebop, an anime and manga popular in Japan and also widely popular in the United States, often credited with significantly broadening the popularity of anime in the United States. ... Creative Commons mark The lowercase variant cc can refer to: C compiler, a compiler that translates the C programming language into a machine-readable instruction set on UNIX based operating systems, such as Linux or FreeBSD. compiler-compiler, aka parser generator, also on UNIX based operating systems carbon copy, in... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... CE is an abbreviation which can have the following meanings: Capillary electrophoresis the CE mark is a stylized CE placed on products to signify conformance with European Union regulations. ... // Cf or CF may stand for: cf. ... CG or Cg may stand for: computer graphics center of gravity CG artwork, digitally made artwork, digital effects, or simply hand drawn art saved on a computer Cg programming language, developed by NVIDIA Chappe et Gessalin, a French automobile maker Character generator, broadcast graphic systems Coast guard Confused Gamer Conceptual... CH can mean: Cargo helicopter (U.S. military helicopter alpha-numeric prefix) Companion of Honour, a member of the Order of the Companions of Honour, which is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... CI can mean: Cayman Islands Certificate of Identity of colonial Hong Kong certificate of insurance Chile, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram China Airlines, the IATA airline designator Christmas Island, an external territory of Australia Cocos Island, off the Republic of Costa Rica Cocos (Keeling) Islands, an external... CJ may stand for: Cayman Islands, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cessna 525 Citation Jet -- also CJ1, CJ1+, CJ2, CJ2+, CJ3, and CJ4 business jets by Cessna Aircraft Company. ... CK can mean: Calvin Klein Con Kolivas, the Linux Kernel patcher. ... CL or Cl or cl may be: The Mercedes-Benz CL, an automobile Camp Lazlo Car Lift CAS Latency cathodoluminescence centilitre (cl) Central League (Japanese baseball) Champions League Chile (ISO country code) chlorine (Cl), chemical element cl. ... // CM, cM, Cm or cm may stand for: CM Apollo Command/Service Module (command module is one half) Cameroon, ISO and FIPS country code category management Catholic Memorial center of mass Championship Manager, a series of association football computer games Chelmsford British post code region CM Chessmaster Chief Minister of... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: CN, cn CN or cn may stand for: Calcineurin (CN) Canadian National Railway (AAR reporting mark CN) and the CN Tower Canadian Northern Railway Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee Cartoon Network Chief of Navy China (Peoples Republic), ISO 3166-1... CO can stand for: Carbon monoxide, molecular formula Central office, in telecommunications and telephony Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Colombia, in various country codes Colorado, U.S. postal abbreviation Commanding officer, military Conscientious objector, military Continental Airlines, IATA airline designator Collaborative Browsing Chinese Orchestra Correctional Officer, Correctional Officer Co can stand... Cp, CP, cp, cP may be: // In chemistry, the cyclopentadienyl ligand. ... CQ can stand for several different things: CQ is a code used by wireless telegraphy and voice operators to make a general call, invitating other operators listening on that channel to respond. ... For information on cleanup resources in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia Cleanup Resources CR can mean: Caloric restriction Carriage return Castle Rock, the name of several towns Challenge Rating, a term representing difficulty in Dungeons & Dragons Change Request, in industry programming terminology Channel Representative Cocoa Roach (Carracho X) College Republicans Comfort Room... // CS, Cs or cs may have meaning in the following areas: Counter-scanning Cesium, the chemical element (Cs) CS gas, 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile, used as a riot control agent Cable select, an ATA (or IDE) device setting for automatic drive master / slave configuration Cerulean Studios LLC, creators of the Trillian chat... Look up CT, Ct, ct in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... CU may stand for: Cervecerias Unidas, SA, NYSE ticker symbol Champaign-Urbana Metropolitan Area Christian Union, a political party in the Netherlands College University, an animated Internet-based comedy series Control unit credit union CU (Powerline), a HVDC-powerline in the USA Cuba, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and... // CV, cv, Cv or cV can stand for: CV Aircraft carrier, United States Navys hull classification symbol Cape Verde, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cardiovascular, in medicine Cargolux, IATA airline designator Central Vermont Railway reporting mark Coefficient of variation, in mathematics Combat Vehicle 90... CW may stand for: The CW Television Network (colloquially The CW), a television network which launched in September 2006 as a merger of both the UPN and The WB networks. ... CX or Cx may stand for: Cx, the letter in the Esperanto alphabet Cross-examination debate Categorical exclusion (U.S. government) the IATA code for Cathay Pacific Airways Fuji Television - A Japanese TV network in Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan - JOCX-TV, JOCX-DTV Christmas Island (ISO 3166-1 alpha-2) Circumflex... CY may be: A male given name Calendar year Common Year Container yard Cubic yard, although the more frequent abbreviation is cu yd Cy or Cyclones, the athletic mascot of Iowa State University Cyprus, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cyprus Airways, the IATA airline designator... CZ (and variants) is an abbreviation that can mean: Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup CZ Cubic zirconia, a common simulation diamond  Czech Republic, ISO 3166 and obsolete NATO digram ÄŒeskoslovenská Statni Zbrojovka Brno, a Czechoslovak firearms manufacturer and state arsenal ÄŒeská Zbrojovka Uhersky Brod (ÄŒZUB), a Czech firearms manufacturer ÄŒeská Zbrojovka Strakonice... CA or ca may stand for: C&A stores calcium (Ca): symbol for the chemical element California: State of, United States Canada (ISO country code) Catalan language (ISO 639 alpha-2) Cellular automata Central America Certificate authority Channel America: Defunct US television network Chartered accountant Chemical Abstract Citizens Alliance: Political... CB (or derivative) may be: Cowboy Bebop, an anime and manga popular in Japan and also widely popular in the United States, often credited with significantly broadening the popularity of anime in the United States. ... Creative Commons mark The lowercase variant cc can refer to: C compiler, a compiler that translates the C programming language into a machine-readable instruction set on UNIX based operating systems, such as Linux or FreeBSD. compiler-compiler, aka parser generator, also on UNIX based operating systems carbon copy, in... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... CE is an abbreviation which can have the following meanings: Capillary electrophoresis the CE mark is a stylized CE placed on products to signify conformance with European Union regulations. ... // Cf or CF may stand for: cf. ... CG or Cg may stand for: computer graphics center of gravity CG artwork, digitally made artwork, digital effects, or simply hand drawn art saved on a computer Cg programming language, developed by NVIDIA Chappe et Gessalin, a French automobile maker Character generator, broadcast graphic systems Coast guard Confused Gamer Conceptual... CH can mean: Cargo helicopter (U.S. military helicopter alpha-numeric prefix) Companion of Honour, a member of the Order of the Companions of Honour, which is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... CI can mean: Cayman Islands Certificate of Identity of colonial Hong Kong certificate of insurance Chile, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram China Airlines, the IATA airline designator Christmas Island, an external territory of Australia Cocos Island, off the Republic of Costa Rica Cocos (Keeling) Islands, an external... CJ may stand for: Cayman Islands, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cessna 525 Citation Jet -- also CJ1, CJ1+, CJ2, CJ2+, CJ3, and CJ4 business jets by Cessna Aircraft Company. ... CK can mean: Calvin Klein Con Kolivas, the Linux Kernel patcher. ... CL or Cl or cl may be: The Mercedes-Benz CL, an automobile Camp Lazlo Car Lift CAS Latency cathodoluminescence centilitre (cl) Central League (Japanese baseball) Champions League Chile (ISO country code) chlorine (Cl), chemical element cl. ... // CM, cM, Cm or cm may stand for: CM Apollo Command/Service Module (command module is one half) Cameroon, ISO and FIPS country code category management Catholic Memorial center of mass Championship Manager, a series of association football computer games Chelmsford British post code region CM Chessmaster Chief Minister of... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: CN, cn CN or cn may stand for: Calcineurin (CN) Canadian National Railway (AAR reporting mark CN) and the CN Tower Canadian Northern Railway Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee Cartoon Network Chief of Navy China (Peoples Republic), ISO 3166-1... CO can stand for: Carbon monoxide, molecular formula Central office, in telecommunications and telephony Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Colombia, in various country codes Colorado, U.S. postal abbreviation Commanding officer, military Conscientious objector, military Continental Airlines, IATA airline designator Collaborative Browsing Chinese Orchestra Correctional Officer, Correctional Officer Co can stand... Cp, CP, cp, cP may be: // In chemistry, the cyclopentadienyl ligand. ... CQ can stand for several different things: CQ is a code used by wireless telegraphy and voice operators to make a general call, invitating other operators listening on that channel to respond. ... For information on cleanup resources in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia Cleanup Resources CR can mean: Caloric restriction Carriage return Castle Rock, the name of several towns Challenge Rating, a term representing difficulty in Dungeons & Dragons Change Request, in industry programming terminology Channel Representative Cocoa Roach (Carracho X) College Republicans Comfort Room... // CS, Cs or cs may have meaning in the following areas: Counter-scanning Cesium, the chemical element (Cs) CS gas, 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile, used as a riot control agent Cable select, an ATA (or IDE) device setting for automatic drive master / slave configuration Cerulean Studios LLC, creators of the Trillian chat... Look up CT, Ct, ct in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... CU may stand for: Cervecerias Unidas, SA, NYSE ticker symbol Champaign-Urbana Metropolitan Area Christian Union, a political party in the Netherlands College University, an animated Internet-based comedy series Control unit credit union CU (Powerline), a HVDC-powerline in the USA Cuba, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and... // CV, cv, Cv or cV can stand for: CV Aircraft carrier, United States Navys hull classification symbol Cape Verde, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cardiovascular, in medicine Cargolux, IATA airline designator Central Vermont Railway reporting mark Coefficient of variation, in mathematics Combat Vehicle 90... CW may stand for: The CW Television Network (colloquially The CW), a television network which launched in September 2006 as a merger of both the UPN and The WB networks. ... CX or Cx may stand for: Cx, the letter in the Esperanto alphabet Cross-examination debate Categorical exclusion (U.S. government) the IATA code for Cathay Pacific Airways Fuji Television - A Japanese TV network in Odaiba, Tokyo, Japan - JOCX-TV, JOCX-DTV Christmas Island (ISO 3166-1 alpha-2) Circumflex... CY may be: A male given name Calendar year Common Year Container yard Cubic yard, although the more frequent abbreviation is cu yd Cy or Cyclones, the athletic mascot of Iowa State University Cyprus, ISO 3166, FIPS Pub 10-4 and obsolete NATO digram Cyprus Airways, the IATA airline designator... CZ (and variants) is an abbreviation that can mean: Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup CZ Cubic zirconia, a common simulation diamond  Czech Republic, ISO 3166 and obsolete NATO digram ÄŒeskoslovenská Statni Zbrojovka Brno, a Czechoslovak firearms manufacturer and state arsenal ÄŒeská Zbrojovka Uhersky Brod (ÄŒZUB), a Czech firearms manufacturer ÄŒeská Zbrojovka Strakonice... The C0 and C1 control code sets define control codes for use in text. ... C1 or C-1 may refer to: In vehicles BMW C1, a security scooter with a roof Citroën C1, a small car Ford C1 platform, the Ford Motor Companys global compact car automobile platform Hawker-Siddeley C1 Andover transport aircraft Kawasaki C-1, an indigeneous transport aircraft of... C2 may refer to: Citroën C2, a car produced by Citroën in 2004 Vitamin C2, a name sometimes used for Choline C2 (protocol), a file transfer protocol C2 (radio), a Welsh language music show on BBC Radio Cymru C2 explosive, a form of plastic explosive C2 Educational Center... C3 or C-3 can refer to: C3 (complement), a component of the blood clotting control system C3 carbon fixation in plants C-3 Martin, a U.S. military transport aircraft HMS C3, a British C class submarine USS C-3 (SS-14), a U.S. C class submarine USS... C4 or C-4 may refer to: C-4 (explosive), a type of plastic explosive In biology: C4 carbon fixation, a pathway for carbon fixation in photosynthesis Fourth cervical vertebra or C4 spinal nerve, in human anatomy Complement component 4 In vehicles: USS C-4 (SS-15), a United States... C5 or C-5 may refer to: An inactive complement protein of the complement system. ... C6 or C-6 may refer to: C6, the IATA code for CanJet. ... C7 or C-7 may refer to: The Diemaco C7, a rifle. ... C8 or C-8 may refer to: The Diemaco C8, a rifle. ... C9 or C-9 may refer to: Hi-Point Models C9 and C9 Comp handguns. ... The First Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources (1C) refers to the catalogue listed in the article Ryle M, Smith F G & Elsmore B (1950) MNRAS vol 110 pp508-523 A Preliminary Survey of Radio Stars in the Northern Hemisphere. [1] The 1C catalogue listed about 50 radio sources, detected at... The Second Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources (2C) was published in 1955 by J R Shakeshaft and colleagues. ... 3C may refer to the digital radio station of the same name The Third Cambridge Catalog of Radio Sources (3C) is an astronomical catalogue of celestial radio sources as measured at 159-MHz. ... 4C stands for Community Coordinated Care for Children. ... The Fifth Cambridge Catalog of Radio Sources (5C) is an astronomical catalogue of celestial radio sources as measured at 408-MHz and 1407-MHz. ... The 6C Survey of radio sources (6C) is an astronomical catalogue of celestial radio sources as measured at 151-MHz. ... The Seventh Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources (7C) See also Cambridge Radio Surveys: 1C - 2C - 3C - 4C - 5C - 6C - 7C - 8C - 9C 3CR Categories: | | | ... The Eighth Cambridge Survey (8C) is an astronomical catalogue of celestial radio sources as measured at 38-MHz. ... The Nineth Cambridge Catalog of Radio Sources (9C) is an astronomical catalogue of celestial radio sources as measured at 15-GHz. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Palaeography (British) or paleography (American) (from the Greek palaiós, old and graphein, to write) is the study of ancient handwriting, independent of the language (Koine Greek, Classical Latin, Medieval Latin, Old English, etc. ... Variants of the Latin alphabet are used by the writing systems of many languages throughout the world. ... Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ... The term punctuation has two different linguistic meanings: in general, the act and the effect of punctuating, i. ... Roman numerals are a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... Unicode as of version 5. ... List of Latin letters. ...

calcium gluconate chemical structure

I'm having trouble putting together the chemical structure of calcium gluconate. I've tried using the BKchem molecular editor or similar programs to lay it out but i've completely forgotten how to do so. If this was all still fresh in my mind from my school years, I'd have no problem. Wikipedia shows a good bit of information about calcium gluconate, but in particular I need to see in diagram form the chemical structure of said supplement. Again, I've completely forgotten how to put these things together. [1]


Vascular infection

I work in a hospital and one day I went to get a blood sample from a patient and her left arm had lines on it like someone had drawn thin veins on her with a ball-point pen. She said ti was an infection but does anyone have any idea what this is? ~~Christopher


  Results from FactBites:
 
NBC11.com - Health Encyclopedia - Vitamin C (695 words)
Vitamin C is required for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body.
Vitamin C is essential for the healing of wounds, and for the repair and maintenance of cartilage, bones, and teeth.
All fruits and vegetables contain some amount of vitamin C. Foods that tend to be the highest sources of vitamin C include green peppers, citrus fruits and juices, strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, turnip greens and other leafy greens, sweet and white potatoes, and cantaloupe.
HEPATITIS C INFO CENTER - Updated Daily (1937 words)
Infection due to Hepatitis C accounts for 20% of all cases of acute hepatitis, an estimated 26,000 new acute infections, and 10,000-12,000 deaths each year in the United States.
HCV Genotypes: It is much easier to talk of the Hepatitis C virus as if it is a single organism but in fact it is a range of viruses, similar enough to be called Hepatitis C virus, yet different enough to be classified into subgroups.
Hepatitis C Patient's Bulletin Board: This Bulletin Board is for discussions on hepatitis, treatments, etc. Please participate in any of the discussions listed on the left or post your own new discussion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m