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Encyclopedia > C. Northcote Parkinson

Cyril Northcote Parkinson (born July 30, 1909 in Barnard Castle, Durham County- died March 9, 1993 in Canterbury, Kent) was a naval historian and author of some sixty books, the most famous of which was his best seller Parkinson's Laws, which led him to be also considered as an important scholar in the field of public administration. July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Statistics Population: 5,326 (2001) [1] Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ047166 Administration District: Teesdale Shire county: County Durham Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: County Durham Historic county: County Durham Services Police force: Durham Constabulary Ambulance service: North East Post office... Durham County has several possible meanings: Durham County, North Carolina in the United States Durham County, Ontario in Canada County Durham in England For other meanings of Durham please see Durham (disambiguation) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (69th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ...

Contents

Early life and education

The youngest son of William Edward Parkinson (1871-1927), an art master at North East County School and from 1913 principal of York School of Arts and Crafts, and his wife, Rose Emily Mary Curnow (born 1877), the young Parkinson atended St. Peter's School, York, where in 1929 he won an exhibition for studying history at Emmanuel College at the University of Cambridge, where he was graduated in 1932. As an undergraduate, Parkinson developed an interest in naval history, which he pursued when the Pellew family gave him access to family papers at the recently establihsed National Maritime Museum, allowing him to write his first book, Edward Pellew, Viscount Exmouth, Admiral of the Red in 1934, then enrolled as a graduate student at King's College, London, where he wrote his thesis on War in the Eastern Seas, 1793-1815, which was awarded the Julian Corbett Prize in Naval History for 1935. Founded in the English City of York by St Paulinus of York in 627; and one of the oldest schools in the UK. An early headmaster Alcuin (Flaccus Albinus Alcuinus), went on to be Chancellor to the Emperor Charlemagne, and founded several of the earliest Universities and Schools in mainland... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College(s) Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location St Andrews Street Undergraduates 494 Postgraduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University... The University of Cambridge (usually abbreviated as Cantab. ... Naval warfare is combat in and on seas and oceans. ... The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich The National Maritime Museum (NMM) is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom, and one of the most important in the world. ... Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth (1757-1833) was a British naval officer. ... Kings College London (often abbreviated to KCL) in London is one of the largest colleges in the federal University of London, with 19,500 registered students. ... The Julian Corbett Prize in Modern Naval History was established by Mr. ...


Academic and military career

While still a graduate student in 1934, Parkinson joined the Territorial Army as a member of the 22nd London Regiment (The Queen's) and commanded an infantry company at the jubilee of King George V in 1935. In the same year, Emmanuel College, Cambridge elected him a research fellow. While at Cambridge, he commanded an infantry unity of the Cambridge University Officers' Training Corps. The Territorial Army (TA) is a part of the British Army, the land armed forces of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at the same rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ... King George V King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College(s) Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location St Andrews Street Undergraduates 494 Postgraduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University...


From 1938 to 1945, he held a succession of positions, first becoming senior history master at Blundell's School in Tiverton, Devon in 1938, then instructor at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1939. In 1940, he was commissioned an Army captain in the Queen's Royal Regiment, which led to a range of staff and military teaching positions in Britain. In 1943, he married, Ethelwyn Edith Graves (born 1915), a nurse tutor at Middlesex Hopsital, with whom he was to have two children. Blundells School is a British public school, located in Tiverton in the county of Devon. ... Tiverton is a town in the County of Devon, in England. ... Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, is the location of initial officer training in the Royal Navy, and is located on a hill overlooking the town of Dartmouth in the county of Devon, England. ...


Demobilized as an Army major in 1945, he was appointed lecturer in history at the University of Liverpool from 1946 to 1949. In 1950, he was appointed Raffles professor of history at the newly established University of Malaya in Singapore, and while there initiated an important series of historical monographs on the history of Malaya, publishing the very first of the series in 1960. A movement developed in the mid-1950s to establish two campuses, one in Kuala Lumpur and one in Singapore. Parkinson actively attempted to persuade the authorities to avoid dividing the university, but to maintain it to serve both Singapore and Malaya in Johor Bahru. His efforts were unsuccessful and the two campuses were established in 1959. The original Singapore campus, where Parkinson taught, later became the University of Singapore. The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... The University of Malaya (or Universiti Malaya in Malay; commonly abbreviated as UM) is the oldest university in Malaysia, and is situated on a 750 acre (3. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: JB, Bandar Raya Selatan (Southern City) Motto: Berkhidmat, Berbudaya, Berwawasan (English: Servicing, cultured, visionary) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: Country Malaysia State Johor Establishment 1855 Granted city status 1994 Government  - Mayor Latiff Yusof Area  - City 185 km²  (72. ... The National University of Singapores (Abbreviated NUS; Chinese: 新加坡国立大学; Abbreviated 国大) flagship Kent Ridge campus is located in the southwest of the Republic of Singapore at Kent Ridge, bounded by the Ayer Rajah Expressway (AYE), Clementi Road, Buona Vista Road and Kent Ridge Park, with an area of approximately 1. ...


Parkinson and his wife divorced in 1952 and he married the writer and journalist Ann Fry (1921-1983), with whom he had two sons and a daughter. In 1958, while still in Singapore, Parkinson published his most famous work Parkinson's Law, a book that expanded upon a humorous article that he had first published in the Economist magazine in November 1955, satirizing government bureauacracies. The 100-page book, first published in the United States and then in Britain, was illustrated by Osbert Lancaster and became an instant best seller. This collection of short studies explained the inevitability of bureaucratic expansion, arguing that 'work expands to fill the time available for its completion'. Typical of his satire and cynical humour, the book included his famous discourse on color of the bikeshed, a note on why driving on the left side of the road (see road transport) is natural, and suggested that the Royal Navy would eventually have more admirals than ships. After serving as visiting professor at Harvard University in 1958 and the University of Illinois and the University of California, Berkeley in 1959-60, he resigned his post in Singapore at the University of Malaya to become an independent writer and celebrity. To avoid high taxation in Britain, he moved to the Channel Islands and settled at St Martin's, Guernsey, where he purchased Les Caches Hall and later restored Annesville Manor. His writings from this period included a series of historical novels featuring a fictional naval officer from Guernsey, Richard Delancey, during the Napoleonic era. Parkinsons law states that work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion. ... Example of a Lancaster Pocket Cartoon Sir Osbert Lancaster (1908 - 1986) was an author, diplomat and art critic. ... The phrase color of the bikeshed is a proverbial phrase, referring to the apparent ease of which one can get approval for building a large and complex project such as a billion-dollar laboratory, while it is hard to get consensus to build something conceptually simple — because everyone involved wants... This article concerns rules of the road regarding land vehicles; for sea-going vehicles, see International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea. ... Disruptions in organized traffic flow can create delays lasting hours. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Founded in 1636,[2] Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning still operating in the United States. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of Malaya (or Universiti Malaya in Malay; commonly abbreviated as UM) is the oldest university in Malaysia, and is situated on a 750 acre (3. ... This article is about the British dependencies. ... This is a map of Guernsey. ... The Napoleonic Era is a period in the History of France and Europe. ...


After the death of his second wife in 1984, he married again in the following year to Iris Hilda Waters (d. 1994) and moved to the Isle of Man. After two years there, they moved to Canterbury, Kent, where Parkinson died in March 1993 at the age of 83. He was buried in Canterbury. St Peters St, Canterbury, from the West Gate, 1993 Canterbury (Latin: Duroverum) is a cathedral city in the county of Kent in southeast England. ...


Published works

Naval Novel Series The Richard Delancey series Richard Delancey is the hero of a series of novels by historian C. Northcote Parkinson. ...

Other Nautical Fiction The Devil to Pay is one of a series of nautical novels by C. Northcote Parkinson. ... The Fireship is one of a series of nautical novels by C. Northcote Parkinson. ...

  • Manhunt (1990)

Other Fiction

  • Ponies Plot (1965)

Biographies of Fictional Characters

  • The Life and Times of Horatio Hornblower (1970)
  • Jeeves: A Gentleman's Personal Gentleman (1981)

Naval History Horatio Hornblower, 1st Viscount Hornblower,AKA Cpl Mitch Vallentine GCB (4 July 1776 - 12 January 1857) is a fictional character, an officer in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, originally the protagonist of a series of novels by C. S. Forester, and later the subject of films and...

  • Edward Pellew, Viscount Exmouth (1934)
  • The Trade Winds, Trade in the French Wars 1793-1815 (1948)
  • Samuel Walters, Lieut. RN (1949)
  • Trade in the Eastern Seas (1955)
  • British Intervention in Malaya, 1867-1877 (1960)
  • East and West (1963)
  • Britannia Rules (1977)
  • A Short History of the British Navy, 1776-1816
  • Portsmouth Point, The Navy in Fiction, 1793-1815 (1948)

Other Non-Fiction Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth (April 9, 1757 – January 23, 1833) was a British naval officer. ...

  • Parkinson's Law (1957)
  • The Evolution of Political Thought (1958)
  • The Law and the Profits (1960)
  • In-Laws and Outlaws (1962)
  • Parkinsanities (1965)
  • Left Luggage (1967)
  • Mrs. Parkinson's Law (1968)
  • The Law of Delay (1970)
  • The fur-lined mousetrap (1972)
  • The Defenders, Script for a "Son et Lumiere" in Guernsey (1975)
  • Gunpowder, Treason and Plot (1978)

Audio Recordings Parkinsons law states that work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion. ...

  • Discusses Political Science with Julian H. Franklin (10 LPs) (1959)

Sources

  • C Northcote Parkinson on Fantastic Fiction
  • C.M. Turnbull, 'Parkinson, Cyril Northcote (1909-1993)' in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004)
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
C. Northcote Parkinson

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Encyclopedia: C. Northcote Parkinson (199 words)
Cyril Northcote Parkinson (July 30, 1909 - March 9, 1993) was a British historian and author of some sixty books.
This is a collection of short studies explaining the inevitability of bureaucratic expansion, and includes a note on why driving on the left side of the road (see road transport) is natural.
As early as the 1930s Parkinson had successfully predicted that the Royal Navy would eventually have more admirals than ships.
Parkinson's law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (214 words)
Northcote Parkinson in the book Parkinson's Law: The Pursuit of Progress, (London, John Murray, 1958) based on extensive experience in the British Civil Service.
"Parkinson's law" is also used to refer to a derivative of the original relating to computers: "Data expands to fill the space available for storage"; buying more memory encourages the use of more memory-intensive techniques.
Parkinson's Law, or The Pursuit of Progress, C. Northcote Parkinson, 1957.
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