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Encyclopedia > Côte d'Ivoire

Côte d'Ivoire (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. It borders Liberia, Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Ghana to the west, north, and east, and borders the Gulf of Guinea to its south. One of the most prosperous of the tropical West African states, its economic development has been undermined by political turmoil spawned by official corruption and refusal to adopt needed reforms. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Côte dIvoire (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... West Africa is the region of western Africa generally considered to include these countries: Benin Burkina Faso Cameroon Côte dIvoire (Ivory Coast) Equatorial Guinea Gabon The Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Republic of the Congo (Congo-Brazzaville) Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Chad, Mauritania, and... The gigantic Gulf of Guinea is the part of the Atlantic southwest of Africa. ...

République de Côte d'Ivoire
(Flag) (Coat of Arms)
Motto: (translation) Unity, Discipline and Labor
Anthem: L'Abidjanaise
Location of Côte d'Ivoire
Capital Yamoussoukro (official), Abidjan (de facto)
6°51′ N 5°18′ W (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=6_51_N_5_18_W_type:city)
Largest city Abidjan
Official languages French
Government
President
Prime Minister
Republic
Laurent Gbagbo
Seydou Diarra
Independence
 - Date
From France
August 7, 1960
Area
 • Total
 • Water (%)
 
322,460 km² (67th)
1.4%
Population
 • 2005 est.
 • 1975 census
 • Density
 
17,298,040 ¹ (57)
~6,700,000
54/km² (118th)
GDP (PPP)
 • Total
 • Per capita
2005 estimate
$28,460 million (98)
$1475 (162)
Currency CFA franc (XOF)
Time zone
 • Summer (DST)
GMT (UTC+0)
not observed (UTC+0)
Internet TLD .ci
Calling code +225
¹ Estimates for this country take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower population than would otherwise be expected.
Contents

8.1 History
8.2 Usage
General info: Large flag of Côte dIvoire Dimensions: 453x302 pixels Source: Image originally derived from the public domain License: Originally public domain, modifications under GFDL Most of the flags have had their colours improved and many have been resized to the proper ratios. ... Coat of Arms of Cote d Ivoire (from govt. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The flag of Côte dIvoire features three equal vertical bands of orange ( hoist side), white, and green. ... The Coat of Arms of Côte dIvoire in its current form was adopted in the year 2001. ... Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... This is a list of national anthems. ... LAbidjanaise (Song of Abidjan) is the national anthem of Côte dIvoire. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Yamoussoukro, a town of 100,000 inhabitants located 240 kilometers North of Abidjan, is the administrative capital of Côte dIvoire. ... Abidjan is the largest city and former capital of Côte dIvoire. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Demographics of Côte dIvoire, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... Abidjan is the largest city and former capital of Côte dIvoire. ... An official language is something that is given a unique status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office. ... The office of Prime Minister of Côte dIvoire was created in 1957. ... In a broad definition a republic is a state or country that is led by people who do not base their political power on any principle beyond the control of the people living in that state or country. ... Laurent Koudou Gbagbo (born May 31, 1945) is the president of Côte dIvoire (since 2000). ... Seydou Elimane Diarra (born November 23, 1933) is the Prime Minister of Côte dIvoire. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Here is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here surface areas between 100,000 km² and 1,000,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Here is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January January 1 - Watergate scandal: John N. Mitchell, H. R. Haldeman, John D. Ehrlichman are found guilty of the Watergate cover-up and are sentenced to 30 months to 8 years in jail on February 21 January 5 - The Tasman Bridge in Tasmania, Australia, is struck by the bulk... Population density can be used as a measurement of any tangible item. ... This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population. ... List of countries/dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The figures in the following table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers). ... In economics, purchasing power parity (PPP) is a method used to calculate an alternative exchange rate between the currencies of two countries. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of countries of the world sorted by their Gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... This is a list of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year, divided by the average population for the same year. ... The countries using the CFA franc The CFA franc (in French: franc CFA, or just franc in everyday conversation if no ambiguity is possible) is a currency used in 12 formerly French-ruled African countries, as well as in Guinea-Bissau (former Portuguese colony) and in Equatorial Guinea (former Spanish... ISO 4217 is an international standard describing three letter codes to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization or ISO. The first two letters of the code are the two letters of ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country codes (which are similar to those used... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Daylight saving time (also called DST, or Summer Time) is the portion of the year in which a regions local time is advanced by (usually) one hour from its standard official time. ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich mean time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich mean time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... The following is a list of currently existing Internet Top-level domains (TLDs). ... .ci is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Côte dIvoire. ... At a glance In depth Zone 1 – North American Numbering Plan Area (nanpa. ...

History

Main article: History of Côte d'Ivoire This is the history of Côte dIvoire. ...

Not much is known about Côte d'Ivoire prior to the arrival of European ships in the 1460s. The major ethnic groups came relatively recently from neighbouring areas: the Kru people migrated from Liberia around 1600; the Senoufo and Lobi moved southward from Burkina Faso and Mali. It wasn't until the 18th and 19th centuries that the Akan people, including the Baoulé, migrated from Ghana into the eastern area of the country and the Malinké migrated from Guinea into the northwest. The Kru are a tribe of people in inland Liberia. ... The Lobi are an ethnic group that originated in what is today Ghana. ... Akan is an ethnic group from western Africa. ... Baoule is a language spoken in Côte dIvoire. ... The Malinké are an African ethnic group. ...


Compared to neighbouring Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire suffered little from the slave trade. European slaving and merchant ships preferred other areas along the coast with better harbours. France took an interest in the 1840s, enticing local chiefs to grant French commercial traders a monopoly along the coast. Thereafter, the French built naval bases to keep out non-French traders and began a systematic conquest of the interior. They accomplished this only after a long war in the 1890s against Mandinka forces, mostly from Gambia. Guerilla warfare by the Baoulé and other eastern groups continued until 1917.


The French had one overriding goal: to stimulate the production of exports. Coffee, cocoa and palm oil crops were soon planted along the coast. Côte d'Ivoire stood out as the only West African country with a sizeable population of 'settlers'; elsewhere in West and Central Africa, the French and English were largely bureaucrats. As a result, a third of the cocoa, coffee and banana plantations were in the hands of French citizens and a hated forced-labour system became the backbone of the economy.


The son of a Baoulé chief, Félix Houphouët-Boigny was to become Côte d'Ivoire's father of independence. In 1944 he formed the country's first agricultural trade union for African cocoa farmers like himself. Annoyed that colonial policy favoured French plantation owners, they united to recruit migrant workers for their own farms. Houphouët-Boigny soon rose to prominence and within a year was elected to the French Parliament in Paris. A year later the French abolished forced labour. As Houphouët-Boigny grew fonder of money and power, and became more ingratiated with the French, he gradually dropped the more radical stance of his youth. France reciprocated by making him the first African to become a minister in a European government. Félix Houphouët-Boigny (fālēks´ oofwā´-bwä´nye) ( October 18, 1905 - December 7, 1993) was the first President of Côte dIvoire ( 1960 - 1993). ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


At the time of Côte d'Ivoire's independence in 1960, the country was easily French West Africa's most prosperous, contributing over 40% of the region's total exports. When Houphouët-Boigny became the country's first president, his government gave farmers good prices to further stimulate production. Coffee production increased significantly, catapulting Côte d'Ivoire into third place in total output behind Brazil and Colombia. Cocoa did the same; by 1979 the country was the world's leading producer. It also became Africa's leading exporter of pineapples and palm oil. Behind the scenes, it was French technicians who had masterminded the programme, which was often referred to as the 'Ivoirian miracle'. In the rest of Africa, Europeans were driven out following independence; in Côte d'Ivoire, they poured in. The French community grew from 10,000 to 50,000, most of them teachers and advisers. For 20 years, the economy maintained an annual growth rate of nearly 10% - the highest of Africa's non-oil exporting countries. 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Politically, Houphouët-Boigny ruled with an iron hand. The press wasn't free, and only one political party was tolerated. Houphouët-Boigny was also Africa's number one producer of 'show' projects. So many millions of dollars were spent transforming his village, Yamoussoukro, into the new capital that it became the butt of jokes. No one was laughing by the early 1980s though, when the world recession and a local drought sent shockwaves through the Ivoirian economy. Thanks also to the overcutting of timber and collapsing sugar prices, the country's external debt increased threefold. Rising crime in Abidjan made news in Europe. The miracle was over. Yamoussoukro, a town of 100,000 inhabitants located 240 kilometers North of Abidjan, is the administrative capital of Côte dIvoire. ...


In 1990, hundreds of civil servants went on strike, joined by students protesting institutional corruption. The unrest forced the government to support multiparty democracy. Houphouët-Boigny became increasingly feeble and died in 1993. His hand-picked successor was Henri Konan Bédié. 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Aimé Henri Konan Bédié (born May 5, 1934 in Dadiékro) was leader of the Democratic Party of Côte dIvoire and President of Côte dIvoire from 1993 to 1999. ...


In October 1995, Bédié overwhelmingly won re-election against a fragmented and disorganised opposition. He tightened his hold over political life, sending several hundred opposition supporters to jail. In contrast, the economic outlook improved, at least superficially, with decreasing inflation and an attempt to remove foreign debt. 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Unlike Houphouët-Boigny, who was very careful in avoiding any ethnic conflict and left access to Ivorian nationality wide-open to immigrants from neighbouring countries, Bedié emphasized the concept of "Ivority" (Ivoirité) to exclude his rival Alassane Ouattara, having only one parent of Ivory Coast nationality, to run for future presidential election. As people originating from Burkina Faso are a large part of the Ivorian population this policy resulted in the exclusion of many people from Ivorian nationality and relationship between various ethnic groups becane strained. Alassane Ouattara is a political leader in Côte dIvoire. ...


In parallel, Bédié excluded many potential opponents from the army. In late 1999, a group of dissatisfied officers staged a military coup putting General Robert Guéi in power, Bédié fled into exile in France. The coup had the effect of reducing crime and corruption, and the generals pressed for austerity and openly campaigned in the streets for a less wasteful society. 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Robert Guéï (March 16, 1941 - September 19, 2002) was the military ruler of the Côte dIvoire from December 24, 1999 to October 26, 2000. ...


An election was held in October 2000 in which Laurent Gbagbo vied with Robert Guéi for the presidency, but it was neither peaceful nor democratic. The lead up to the elections was marked by military and civil unrest. Guéi's attempt to fix the election led to a public uprising, resulting in around 180 deaths and his swift replacement by the elections' likely winner, Gbagbo. Alassane Ouattara, was disqualified by the country's Supreme Court, which based his ineligibility on his Burkinabé nationality. The disqualification sparked violent protests in which his supporters, mainly from the country's Muslim north, battled riot police in the capital, Yamoussoukro. Laurent Koudou Gbagbo (born May 31, 1945) is the president of Côte dIvoire (since 2000). ... Alassane Ouattara is a political leader in Côte dIvoire. ...


On September 19, 2002, troops mutinied and gained control of the north of the country. In Abidjan, the gendarmerie was seized by the rebels and former president Guéi was murdered with fifteen persons in his home. Alassane Ouattara took refuge in the French embassy. What exactly happened on the night of September 19 is confused; some report the events as a military coup attempt, but other sources report that opponents were executed by pro-Gbagbo death squads and that the rebellion was an unplanned reaction. September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A death squad is an extra-judicial group whose members execute or assassinate persons they believe to be politically unreliable or undesirable. ...


An early ceasefire with the rebels, who had the full backing of the northern populace (mostly of Burkinabé origins), proved short-lived and fighting over the prime cocoa-growing areas resumed. France sent in troops to maintain the cease-fire boundaries, and militias, including warlords and fighters from Liberia and Sierra Leone, took advantage of the crisis to seize parts of the west.


In January 2003, President Gbagbo and rebel leaders signed accords creating a 'government of national unity'. Curfews were lifted and French troops cleaned up the lawless western border of the country. But the central problems remained, and neither side achieved its goals. 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ...


Since then, the unity government has proven extremely unstable. In March 2004, 120 people were killed in an opposition rally. A later report concluded the killings were pre-planned. Though UN peacekeepers were deployed, relations between Gbagbo and the opposition continued to deteriorate. 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Côte d'Ivoire Côte dIvoire is a republic, with a multiparty presidential regime established in 1960. ...

The official capital since 1983 is Yamoussoukro; however, Abidjan remains the administrative center. Most countries maintain their embassies in Abidjan. The population continues to suffer because of an on-going civil war. International human rights organizations have noted problems with the treatment of captive non-combatants by both sides and the re-emergence of child slavery among workers in cocoa production. 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yamoussoukro, a town of 100,000 inhabitants located 240 kilometers North of Abidjan, is the administrative capital of Côte dIvoire. ... Abidjan is the largest city and former capital of Côte dIvoire. ...


See also: Civil war in Côte d'Ivoire The Civil war in Côte dIvoire began on September 19, 2002, and restarted in November 2004. ...


Départements

Main article: Départements of Côte d'Ivoire Côte dIvoire is divided into 58 départements: See also Politics of Côte dIvoire Categories: Lists of subnational entities | Côte dIvoire ...

Côte d'Ivoire is divided into 58 departments (départements). The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties and are now grouped into 22 metropolitan and four overseas régions. ...


Geography

Enlarge
Map Of Côte d'Ivoire

Main article: Geography of Côte d'Ivoire Map of Côte dIvoire. ... Map of Côte dIvoire. ... Côte dIvoire (the Ivory Coast) is a sub-Saharan nation in southern West Africa located at 8 00°N, 5 00°W. The country is shaped like a square and borders the Gulf of Guinea in the north Atlantic Ocean to the south (515km of coastline) and five...

Côte d'Ivoire is a country of western Sub-Saharan Africa. It borders Liberia and Guinea in the west, Mali and Burkina Faso in the north, Ghana in the east, and the Gulf of Guinea (Atlantic Ocean) in the south. Sub-Saharan Africa, Africa south of the Sahara Desert, is the term used to describe those countries of Africa that are not part of North Africa. ... The gigantic Gulf of Guinea is the part of the Atlantic southwest of Africa. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Côte d'Ivoire This article describes the Economy of Côte dIvoire The Ivorian economy is largely market based and depends heavily on the agricultural sector. ...

Maintaining close ties to France since independence in 1960, diversification of agriculture for export, and encouragement of foreign investment has made Côte d'Ivoire one of the most prosperous of the tropical African states. 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Côte d'Ivoire Demographics of Côte dIvoire, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ...

76% of the population are considered Ivorians. They belong to different peoples, which linguistically are summarized under the language groups of Kwa, Kru, Mande, and Gur.


Since Cote d'Ivoire has established itself as one of the most successful west African nations, about 20% of the population consists of workers from neighbouring Liberia, Burkina Faso and Guinea. This fact has created steadily increasing tension in recent years, especially since most of these workers are Muslims while the native-born population is largely Christian, primarily Roman Catholic, and animist. 4% of the population is of non-African ancestry. Many are French, British, and Spanish citizens, as well as Protestant missionaries of American and Canadian background. In November 2004, around 10,000 French and other foreign nationals evacuated Cote d'Ivoire due to attacks from pro-government youth militias. A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The term Christian means belonging to Christ and is derived from the Greek noun Χριστός Khristós which means anointed one, which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word Moshiach (Hebrew: משיח, also written Messiah), (and in Arabic it is pronounced Maseeh مسيح). ... The Catholic Church in Côte dIvoire is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Côte d'Ivoire The culture of Côte dIvoire is ethnically diverse. ...

See also: List of writers from Côte d'Ivoire, Art of Côte d'Ivoire Côte dIvoires capital, Abidjan, is perhaps the most influential city in recorded African music, with performers coming from across the continent to record their singles and albums. ... Alpha Blondy (born 1 January 1953) is a reggae singer, born Seydou Koné in Dimbokoro, Côte dIvoire. ... The gyil is a pentatonic percussion instrument, common to Ghana, Burkina Faso and Côte dIvoire. ... The Djun-Djun or Djum-Djum (pronounced dununs or dundun) is a cylindrical, double-headed bass drum carved from solid Dembu log and using cow skin membranes. ... Islam came to West Africa in three waves. ... African Writers (by country): This is a list of literary figures from the African continent, listed by country, including poets, novelists, childrens writers, essayists, and scholars, listed by country. ... Makonde carving c. ...


The name

History

The country was originally known in English as Ivory Coast, and corresponding translations in other languages: Elfenbeinküste in German, Costa de Marfil in Spanish, and so on. Because of the disorder this could allegedly produce in international settings, in October 1985 the government requested that the country be known as Côte d'Ivoire in every language. In fact, according to national law, the name of the country cannot be translated from French. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Usage

Despite the Ivorian government's ruling, "Ivory Coast" (sometimes "the Ivory Coast") is still the most commonly used name in English. Governments, however, use "Côte d'Ivoire" for diplomatic reasons. Journalistic Style guides usually (but not always) recommend "Ivory Coast": Style guides generally give guidance on language use. ...

  • The Guardian newspaper's Style Guide (http://www.guardian.co.uk/styleguide/page/0,5817,184827,00.html) says: "Ivory Coast, not "the Ivory Coast" or Côte D'Ivoire; its nationals are Ivorians"
  • The BBC usually uses "Ivory Coast".
  • The Economist newsmagazine's Style Guide (http://www.economist.com/research/styleGuide/index.cfm?page=805717) says "Côte d'Ivoire not Ivory Coast".
  • The United States Department of State uses "Côte d'Ivoire".

The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was formed in 1927 by means of a royal charter. ... Front cover, May 7, 2005 The Economist is a market liberal weekly news and international affairs publication of The Economist Newspaper Limited in London. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ...

Miscellaneous topics

  • Communications in Côte d'Ivoire
  • Transportation in Côte d'Ivoire
  • Military of Côte d'Ivoire
  • Foreign relations of Côte d'Ivoire
  • Civil war in Côte d'Ivoire
  • Category:Côte d'Ivoire music

Telephones - main lines in use: 182,000 (1998) Telephones - mobile cellular: more than 60,000 (December 1998) Telephone system: well-developed by African standards but operating well below capacity domestic: open-wire lines and microwave radio relay; 90% digitalized international: satellite earth stations - 2 Intelsat (1 Atlantic Ocean and 1... Railways total: 660 km narrow gauge: 660 km 1. ... The 17,000-man Ivorian Armed Forces (FANCI) include an army, navy, air force, and gendarmerie. ... Deterioration in the Ivory Coast`s relationship with France needs to be documented here. ... The Civil war in Côte dIvoire began on September 19, 2002, and restarted in November 2004. ...

References

  • Much of the material in these articles comes from the CIA World Factbook 2000 and the 2003 U.S. Department of State website.

World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ...

External links

  • Parti Ivoirien du Peuple (http://www.pipci.org/)
  • Lonely Planet country profile (http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations/africa/cote_divoire/)
  • BBC country profile (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/country_profiles/1043014.stm)
  • AfricaST country profile (http://www.africast.com/country.php?strCountry=Ivory%20Coast)
  • Cote d'Ivoire Civil War (http://globalsecurity.org/military/world/war/ivory-coast.htm)
  • French Soldiers Machine-gun Civilians on 'Ivory Coast'. (video, November 2004) (http://www.metafilter.com/mefi/37105)


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Countries in Africa

Algeria | Angola | Benin | Botswana | Burkina Faso | Burundi | Cameroon | Cape Verde | Central African Republic | Chad | Comoros | Democratic Republic of the Congo | Republic of the Congo | Côte d'Ivoire | Djibouti | Egypt | Equatorial Guinea | Eritrea | Ethiopia | Gabon | The Gambia | Ghana | Guinea | Guinea-Bissau | Kenya | Lesotho | Liberia | Libya | Madagascar | Malawi | Mali | Mauritania | Mauritius | Morocco | Mozambique | Namibia | Niger | Nigeria | Rwanda | São Tomé and Príncipe | Senegal | Seychelles | Sierra Leone | Somalia | Somaliland | South Africa | Sudan | Swaziland | Tanzania | Togo | Tunisia | Uganda | Zambia | Zimbabwe | Western Sahara This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... The Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe is a tiny two- island nation in the Gulf of Guinea, distanced 140 kilometers from one another, and situated about 250 and 225 kilometers, respectively, off the northwestern coast of Gabon. ... Somaliland (Somali: Soomaaliland) is a former British territory located in the northwest region of Somalia in the Horn of Africa. ...

Dependencies: Canary Islands | Ceuta and Melilla | Madeira Islands | Mayotte | Réunion | Saint Helena and dependencies

 
 

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