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Encyclopedia > Córdoba, Spain

See Córdoba for other places with the same name. Córdoba most commonly means Córdoba, Spain, a famous city in Spain inhabited since the time of ancient Rome, and the seat of the Emir of Córdoba and the Caliph of Córdoba. ...


Córdoba is a city in Andalusia, southern Spain, and the capital of the province of Córdoba. Located at 37.88° North, 4.77° West, on the Guadalquivir river, it was founded in ancient Roman times as Corduba by Claudius Marcellus. Its population is about 306,000 as of 2004. A city is an urban area, differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Motto: Dominator Hercules Fundator Andalucía por sí, para España y la humanidad (Andalusia for herself, for Spain, and for humanity) Capital Seville Area  – Total  – % of Spain Ranked 2nd  87 268 km²  17,2% Population  – Total (2003)  – % of Spain  – Density Ranked 1st  7 478 432  17,9%  85,70/km² Demonym... Cordoba province Córdoba is a province of southern Spain, in the north-central part of the autonomous community of Andalusia. ... Guadalquivir is the second longest river of Spain. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Enlarge
Córdoba, the Roman bridge and the Mosque-Cathedral
View across the old Roman bridge towards the Mezquita

Today a moderately sized modern city, the old town contains many impressive architectural reminders of when Córdoba was the thriving capital of the Caliphate of Cordoba that governed all Andalusia. Download high resolution version (999x461, 66 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (999x461, 66 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... Córdoba, Spain: View across old Roman bridge to Mesquita. ... Córdoba, Spain: View across old Roman bridge to Mesquita. ... This article is about the edifice. ... Interior of the Mezquita Mezquita, (from Arabic Masjid), is Spanish for mosque. This article deals with the one in Cordoba, Spain. ... The Caliph of Cordoba ruled Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus) and North Africa from the city of Cordoba, from 929 to 1031. ... Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ...


Córdoba was the birthplace of three famous philosophers: the Roman Stoic, Seneca, the Muslim Averroes, and the Jewish Maimonides. Córdoba was also the birthplace of the Roman poet, Lucan and (more recently) of several flamenco artists including Paco Peña, Vicente Amigo and Joaquín Cortes. Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca, or Seneca the Younger) (c. ... Averroes Averroes (Ibn Rushd) (1126 - December 10, 1198) was an Andalusian philosopher and physician, a master of philosophy and Islamic law, mathematics and medicine. ... Rambam Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (Hebrew: רבי משה בן מיימון; Arabic: Mussa bin Maimun ibn Abdallah al-Kurtubi al-Israili; March 30, 1135—December 13, 1204), commonly known by his Greek name Maimonides, was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher. ... There is also a town named Lucan in Ireland Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39 - April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... Flamenco dancer Belen Maya, photograph taken by Gilles Larrain at his studio, 2001 Flamenco is a song, music and dance style which is strongly influenced by the Gitanos, but which has its deeper roots in Moorish musical traditions. ... Paco Peña (1942 - ) is a Flamenco guitarist. ... Vicente Amigo is a Flamenco guitarist from Córdoba. ...

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History of Córdoba

Roman Córdoba in Hispania Baetica

In Roman times, the city had more cultural buildings than Rome. It was the capital of the province of Hispania Baetica. Remains of the Roman Temple built by Claudius Marcellus, the Roman Bridge (illustration, right) and other Roman remains can still be seen around the city. Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 AD In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ... The numbers and architecture of Roman temples reflect the citys receptivity to all the religions of the world. ...

Interior court of the Mezquita

Interior courtyard of the Mezquita, Cordoba. ... Interior courtyard of the Mezquita, Cordoba. ... Interior of the Mezquita Mezquita, (from Arabic Masjid), is Spanish for mosque. This article deals with the one in Cordoba, Spain. ...

Caliphate of Córdoba

Córdoba (Arabic قرطبه Qurṭubah) was conquered by the Moors in 711, and Moorish influence can still be felt in the city. During the time of Islamic rule, Córdoba was the largest city and embodied the most sophisticated culture and the most developed bureaucracy in Europe. When the Umayyad Caliphs were deposed in Damascus in 750, the dynasty relocated to Córdoba, ruling an emirate there until 929. When Abd-ar-rahman III submitted a rival claim to the title of Caliph, then held by the Abbasids in Baghdad, he assumed the title Caliph of Cordoba and transformed his kingdom from an emirate or sultanate into a caliphate. Arabic (العربية) is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Moors is used in this article to describe the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including the present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb, whose culture is often called Moorish. Origins of the Name Juba II king of Mauretania The name derives from the ancient Berber... See also: phone number 711. ... Islam (Arabic al-islām الإسلام,  listen) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith and the worlds second-largest religion. ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Caliph is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... Damascus by night, the green spots are minarets Damascus (Arabic officially دمشق Dimashq, colloqially ash-Sham الشام) is the capital city of Syria and one of the worlds oldest cities. ... Events Last Umayyad caliph Marwan II (744-750) overthrown by first Abbasid caliph, Abu al-Abbas al-Saffah Categories: 750 | 750s ... Events Emir Abd-ar-rahman III of Cordoba declares himself caliph. ... Abd-ar-Rahman III, Emir and Caliph of Cordoba (912 - 961) was the greatest and the most successful of the princes of the Ummayad dynasty in Spain. ... Abbasid provinces during the caliphate of Harun al-Rashid Abbasid was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Muslim empire, that overthrew the Umayyid caliphs. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... The Caliph of Cordoba ruled Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus) and North Africa from the city of Cordoba, from 929 to 1031. ... Generally speaking, an emirate (Arabic imarah, plural imarat) is a territory that is administered by an emir, although in Arabic the term can be generalized to mean any province of a country that is administered by a member of the ruling class. ... A sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic monarch ruling under the terms of shariah. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ...


Córdoba reached its peak in the 10th century, under three great rulers: the first Caliph, Abd-ar-rahman III ("al-Nasir," 912–61), his son al-Hakam II (961–76) and the brilliant adventurer Al-Mansur Ibn Abi Aamir, more familiar as Almansor, "the Victorious," (981–1002). The 10th century Caliphate of Córdoba was the largest, culturally the most sophisticated polity in all Europe. Contemporary chroniclers, all of them Arabic, like the geographer Ibn Hawkal in 948, marveled, "The amount of coins in circulation! The variety of crops grown! The people!" — Córdoba may have had a quarter of a million people — "the textiles! the gardens! the mosques!" — there were more than 1,000 mosques and 600 public baths. Al-Hakam II was Caliph of Cordoba, in Al-Andalus, and son of Abd_ar_rahman III (al_Nasir). ... Abu Aamir Muhammad Ibn Abdullah Ibn Abi Aamir, Al-Hajib Al-Mansur أبو عامر محمد بن عبد الله بن أبي عامر الحاجب المنصور (c. ...


The German Emperor Otto I sent his emissaries to the Caliph; it never occurred to send anyone to the Kingdom of Leon, which lay to the north. The city of León was founded by the Roman Seventh Legion (for unknown reasons always written as Legio Septima Gemina, or twin seventh legion). It was the headquarters of that legion in the late empire and was a center for trade in gold which was mined at Las Médulas nearby. ...


But in the 1020s and 1030s the whole imposing political structure collapsed, fissioning into more than a dozen successor statelets, known to historians as (the reinos de taifas) such as Seville, Badajoz, Toledo, Saragossa, Albarracín, Valencia, Almería and Granada. Heirs to the wealth of the Caliphate, their instability and endemic hostilities among themselves, made them vulnerable to attacks from the Christian north. The history of Córdoba after the mid 11th century shrinks to the story of the city and its immediate hinterland. The term taifa in the history of Iberia refers to an Islamic independent city-state with its supporting surrounding region, an emirate or petty kingdom, of which a number formed in Al-Andalus after the final collapse of the Umayyad caliphate of Córdoba in 1031. ... The Giralda Tower Seville (Spanish: Sevilla) is the artistic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain, crossed by the river Guadalquivir. ... Badajoz, the capital of the Spanish province of Badajoz in the autonomous community of Extremadura, is situated close to the Portuguese frontier, on the left bank of the river Guadiana, and the Madrid-Lisbon railway. ... The façade of Toledo cathedral The largest Toledo in the world is Toledo, Ohio. ... For alternative meanings, see Zaragoza (disambiguation). ... The Hemispheric at the Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències by Santiago Calatrava, Valencia, Spain. ... Almería (2003 pop. ... The City of Granada Alhambra, Courtyard of the Lions Granada is a city and the capital of the province of Granada, in Spain. ...


The most important monument in the city is the former Mosque (the 3rd largest mosque in the world), known as the Mezquita. After the conquest, the Christians built a cathedral in the middle of this large complex, so it is two temples in one. A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Interior of the Mezquita Mezquita, (from Arabic Masjid), is Spanish for mosque. This article deals with the one in Cordoba, Spain. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ...


Another splendid monument is the city (in ruins) Madinat Al-Zahira. Other important monuments are the Alcazar, where in 1492, Christopher Columbus got permission to travel to the "Indies". The califal baths and its churchs and typical streets of the Jewish quarter Judería. This article is about Spanish Alcazars. ... Events January 2 - Boabdil, the last Moorish King of Granada, surrenders his city to the army of Ferdinand and Isabella after a lengthy siege. ... Christopher Columbus For information about the director, see the article on Chris Columbus. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and Southeast Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, and... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific ethnic background or united in a given culture or religion live as a group, voluntarily or involuntarily, in milder or stricter seclusion. ...


Christian Córdoba

Córdoba was invaded by Christian forces as part of the Reconquista in 1236, and became a centre of activity against the remaining Islamic population. Christianity is an Abrahamic religion based on the life, teachings, death by crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth as described in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Reconquista (Disambiguation). ... Events May 6 - Roger of Wendover, Benedictine monk and chronicler of St Albanss Abbey dies. ...


Surviving Renaissance monuments in Córdoba include the Palacio de Viana, the city's Ducal Palace. By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance -French Renaissance -German Renaissance -English Renaissance The Renaissance was an influential cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ...


It is currently the only major Spanish city with a Communist mayor. Categories: Communist parties | Political parties in Spain ...


External links

  • http://www.cordoba24.info/english Attractions, hotels, restaurants, activities
  • http://www.castillosnet.org/cordoba/index1.shtml

 
 

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