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Encyclopedia > Buzkashi
Game of Buzkashi in Mazari Sharif, Afghanistan

Buzkashi, Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis (Persian: بزکشی buzkashī: goat grabbing) (Uzbek, Tatar, Turkmen: kökbörü, kök "blue" + börü "wolf", Kazakh: көкпар, Kyrgyz: улак) is a traditional Central Asian team sport played on horseback. The steppes' people were skilled riders who could grab a goat or calf from the ground while riding a horse at full gallop. The goal of a player is to grab the carcass of a headless goat or calf, and then get it clear of the other players and pitch it across a goal line or into a target circle or vat. Image File history File links Afghan_Game_Buzkashi. ... Image File history File links Afghan_Game_Buzkashi. ... Mazari Sharif, also known as Mazar-i Sharif or Mazār-e SharÄ«f (Persian: ‎ ), is the fourth largest city of Afghanistan, with population of 300,600 people (2006 official estimate). ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... Kazakh, also Kazak, Qazaq, Khazakh, Kosach, and Kaisak (Қазақ тілі in Cyrillic, Qazaq tili in the Latin alphabet, and قازاق تءىلءي in the Arabic alphabet) is a Western Turkic language closely related to Kyrgyz, Nogai and Karakalpak. ... Kyrgyz or Kirghiz (Кыргыз тили) is a Northwestern Turkic language, and, together with Russian, an official language of Kyrgyzstan. ... The steppe of Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, steppe (from Slavic step) is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally reckoned as being dominated by tall grasses, while short grasses are said... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Cattle calf A Calf (plural calves) is the young of an animal. ...


The game is known as Buzkashi in Afghanistan and among Persian-speaking populations of Central Asia. While Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan refer to the game as Kok-boru or Oglak Tartis.[1] It is a National sport in Afghanistan and Kyrgyzstan. Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ...

Contents

Sport of Central Asia

Even though it is known as a popular Afghan sport, Buzkashi began as a sport of the steppes. It is a popular game among the south Central Asian nomads such as the Hazaras, Tajiks, Uzbeks, Kyrgyz, Kazakhs, and Turkmens. The Turkic name of the game is Kökbörü. Kök = "blue", börü = "wolf", denoting the grey wolf - the holy symbol of the Turkic people. Other Turkic names of the game are Ulak Tartish, Kup Kari, Kök Berü, Ulak Tyrtysh. Kökbörü is the most popular national sport of Kyrgyzstan. In the west, the game is also played by Kyrgyz Turks who migrated to Ulupamir village in Van district of Turkey from the Pamir region. A steppe in Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, a steppe (Russian: - , Ukrainian: - , Kazakh: - ), pronounced in English as , is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally considered as being dominated by tall grasses... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers. ... Kyrgyz (also spelled Kirghiz) are a Turkic ethnic group found primarily in Kyrgyzstan. ... Located in Central Asia, the Pamir Mountains are formed by the junction of the worlds greatest mountain ranges, a geologic structural knot from which the great Tian Shan, Karakoram, Kunlun, and Hindu Kush mountain systems radiate. ...


Competition is typically fierce, as other players may use any force short of tripping the horse in order to thwart scoring attempts. Riders usually wear heavy clothing and head protection to protect themselves against other players' whips and boots. Games can last for several days, and the winning team receives a prize, not necessarily money, as a reward for their win.


The game consists of two main forms: Tudabarai and Qarajai. Tudabarai is considered to be the simpler form of the game. In this version, the goal is simply to grab the calf and move in any direction until clear of the other players. In Qarajai, players must carry the carcass around a flag or marker at one end of the field, then throw it into a scoring circle (the "Circle of Justice") at the other end. The riders will carry a whip, often in their teeth, to fend off opposing horses and riders.


Buzkashi is often compared to polo. The similarities and differences are both fairly obvious: both games are played between people on horseback, both involve propelling an object toward a goal, and both get fairly rough. However, polo is played with a ball, rather than a headless animal; and mallets are used to propel the ball. Moreover, polo requires more teamwork, whereas buzkashi, although contested by teams, is more of a free-for-all contest. Polo matches are played for fixed periods totaling about an hour; traditional buzkashi may continue for days, but in its more regulated tournament version also has a limited match time. A game of polo. ...


The calf in a Buzkashi game is normally beheaded and disemboweled and has its limbs cut off at the knees. It is then soaked in cold water for 24 hours before play to toughen it. Occasionally sand is packed into the carcass to give it extra weight. Players may not strap the calf to their bodies or saddles. Though a goat is used when no calf is available, a calf is less likely to disintegrate during the game. Tack is any of the various accessories worn by horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. ...


Serious Buzkashi players train intensively for years, and many of the masters (called chapandaz) are over forty years old. Playing well also requires specially trained horses that know to stop still when a rider is thrown and to gallop forcefully when their rider gets hold of the calf. These horses can sell today for as much as US$ 10,000 to 15,000. ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


In fiction and popular culture

A game of Buzkashi, played in Afghanistan, is featured in an early scene of Rambo III. Rambo III, the third film in the Rambo series and the sequel to Rambo: First Blood Part II, is an American action film released on May 25, 1988. ...


Buzkashi is described at length in Episode 2, "The Harvest of the Seasons," of The Ascent of Man documentary by Jacob Bronowski. It is put in the context of the development, by the Mongols, of warfare using the horse and its effect on agricultural settlements. The film includes several scenes from a game in Afghanistan. The Ascent of Man (1973) was a groundbreaking BBC documentary series, produced in association with Time-Life Films, written and presented by Jacob Bronowski. ... Jacob Bronowski (January 18, 1908, Łódź, Poland - August 22, 1974, East Hampton, New York, USA) was the presenter of the BBC television documentary series, The Ascent of Man which inspired Carl Sagans Cosmos series. ... The name Mongols (Mongolian: Mongol) specifies one or several ethnic groups. ...


The opening scenes of the Indian film Khuda Gawah, which was filmed in Afghanistan and India, show Amitabh and Sridevi engaged in the game. Amitabh Bachchan (born October 11, 1942, Allahabad, India) also known as Big B, is an Indian actor. ... Sridevi was born on August 13, 1963 in Sivakasi, Tamil Nadu) is an Indian Superstar actress. ...


The game is the core and subject of a novel by French novelist Joseph Kessel titled Les Cavaliers (aka Horsemen) as well as of the film of the same title featuring Omar Sharif, who is a drunk retard that eats kids and has an AK-47, which he uses to kill the kids he eats. Once, he was caught raping a pig with an Almanac Joseph Kessel (February 10, 1898 - July 23, 1979) was a French journalist and novelist of Russian origins. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For Pakistani actor of same name see Umer Sharif. ...



The game is also a key element in the book Caravans by James Michener and the film of the same name starring Anthony Quinn. A scene from the film featuring the king of Afghanistan watching a game included the real-life king at the time, Mohammed Zahir Shah. The whole sequence of the game being witnessed by the king was filmed on the Kabul Golf Course, where the national championships were played at the time the film was made. Caravans comprise land-based trading convoys, often utilising the camel as a beast of burden, and generally associated with crossing deserts in Asia or Africa. ... James Albert Michener (February 3, 1907? - October 16, 1997) was the American author of such books as Tales of the South Pacific (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948), Hawaii, The Drifters, Centennial, The Source, The Fires of Spring, Chesapeake, Caribbean, Caravans, Alaska, Texas and Poland. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... // The Shah was born into the Persian speaking Pashtun Barakzai dynasty of Afghanistan. ...


Buzkashi also featured briefly in John Huston's film The Man Who Would Be King. John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The Man Who Would Be King is a 1975 film adapted from the Rudyard Kipling story of the same title. ...


The 1983 Tom Selleck film High Road to China features a spirited game of buzkashi. Thomas William Selleck (born January 29, 1945 in Detroit, Michigan) is a Golden Globe and Emmy Award winning American actor, screenwriter and film producer, best known for his starring role on the long-running television show Magnum P.I.. // Born in Detroit to a Rusyn father from Slovakia and Scottish... Movie poster for High Road to China High Road to China is a 1983 adventure-comedy film, set in the 1920s, starring Tom Selleck as a hard-drinking biplane pilot hired by society heiress Bess Armstrong to find her father Wilford Brimley, The supporting cast includes Robert Morley and Brian...


Buzkashi is briefly mentioned in the Khaled Hosseini book The Kite Runner, wherein the main protagonist, Amir, witnesses an accident at a Buzkashi game where a chapandaz is trampled to death. Khaled Hosseini (b. ... This article is about the novel. ...


The game is shown briefly in the movie Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story during advertisements for the fictional ESPN 8 (El Ocho) television channel.


It is also shown briefly in the December 2006 Bollywood Movie "Kabul Express"


References

  1. ^ The traditional Oglak Tartis among the Kirghiz of the Pamirs
  • G. Whitney Azoy (2003), "Buzkash:i Game and Power in Afghanistan," 2nd ed. Waveland Press.
  • "Ancient Kyrgyz game may captivate Europe," The Times of Central Asia, 9 Nov. 2006 (www.timesca.com)
  • V. Kadyrov, "Kyrgyzstan: Traditions of Nomads," Rarity Ltd., Bishkek, 2005 ISBN 9967-424-42-7

See also

Pato (sometimes called horseball) is an game played on horseback that combines elements from polo and basketball. ... A game played on horseback where a ball is handled and points are scored by shooting it through a high net. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Buzkashi - definition of Buzkashi in Encyclopedia (359 words)
Buzkashi is a traditional Afghan sport, played from horseback.
The goal of a Buzkashi player is to grab the carcass of a calf, and then get it clear of the other players, or pitch it across a goal line.
Serious Buzkashi players train intensively for years, and many of the masters (called chapandaz) are over forty years old.
NodeWorks - Sports: Equestrian: Buzkashi (170 words)
Buzkashi, or goat grabbing, is the national sport of Afghanistan.
The game starts with a headless goat carcass placed in the center of a circle and surrounded by the players of two opposing teams.
Buzkashi is divided into two versions, Tudabarai and Qarajai.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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