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Encyclopedia > Butler University
Butler University

Motto: Education, Research, Service
Established 1855
Type: Private coeducational liberal arts
Endowment: $139.6 million[1]
President: Bobby Fong
Staff: 280
Students: 4,437
Undergraduates: 3,939
Postgraduates: 498
Location: Indianapolis, IN, USA
Campus: Urban: 290 acres (1.2 km²)
Athletics:
19 Division I NCAA teams,
called Bulldogs
Colors: Blue/White
Website: www.butler.edu

Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. It was founded by abolitionist and attorney Ovid Butler in 1855. It serves over 4,000 undergraduate and graduate students in 60 degree programs through five colleges: Business Administration, Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Pharmacy and Health Sciences, and the Jordan College of Fine Arts. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NCAA redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


North Western Christian University was the name when the school opened on November 1, 1855, at what is now 13th and College, with no president, 2 professors, and 20 students. In 1875, the university moved to a 25-acre campus in Irvington. It was there that the school was renamed Butler University "in recognition of Ovid Butler's inspirational vision, determined leadership, and financial support." In 1922, they purchased Fairview Park, and in 1928, moved their campus to the current Fairview location. The campus consists of 31 buildings covering an area of 290 acres (1.2 km²). Irvington is a former incorporated town (1870), annexed by Indianapolis, Indiana in 1902, that occupies a region of east central Marion County. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ...

Contents

Academics

Bobby Fong is the president of Butler. National guides give Butler high marks for academic quality with an emphasis on the liberal arts and sciences[weasel words]. Butler ranks 4th in the US News & World Report's America's Best Colleges 2008 for Top Midwestern Master's Universities.[1] The university places high emphasis on practicality of knowledge. Butler University offers a maximum amount of individual attention to its students with its small class size and no teaching assistants. Butler University has increased its focus on research with the Butler Summer Institute, a 10 week program where Butler students are granted funding to perform independent research with a faculty member. Their tuition ranks amongst the highest with an annual rate of $38,398


Radio and broadcast television

From 1950 until 1993 Butler University owned and operated, what was at one point, the largest student-run radio station, WAJC. It had a classical format, and existed on 91.9fm, then moved to 104.5fm in 1956. In 1993 Butler sold the station and used part of the seven million dollars earned through the sale to upgrade the Telecommunications major and improve a donated building on Illinois Street to support the program. The School started WTBU, a PBS affiliate, on channel 69. Though Butler has schools for dance, music, and theater, it never developed or showed its own original content on channel 69. After competing for years with WFYI for PBS audiences, in 1999 then president Geoffrey Bannister then signed agreement to operate under a joint operating agreement, which eventually saw WFYI absorb control of the station, leaving Butler to run the academics. In 2001 New Butler President Bobby Fong opened the Telecommunications building on Butler's campus, and almost simultaneously announced the sale of the traditional broadcast station to Telemundo, moving WTBU to a cable-based campus-only broadcaster. The Telecommunications Arts program was renamed "Media Arts" in 2004 although the focus stayed on broadcast skills, including audio production. WTBU(640 AM, 89. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... WFYI channel 20 is the local PBS member station for Indianapolis, Indiana and surrounding areas since it first signed on October 4, 1970. ... WFYI channel 20 is the local PBS member station for Indianapolis, Indiana and surrounding areas since it first signed on October 4, 1970. ... Telemundo is an American television network based in Hialeah, Florida. ...


Theater

Butler's Department of Theatre is known for producing works not commonly seen elsewhere. Focusing on physical and International theatre, Butler has staged experimental interpretations of Samuel Beckett, a complete season of Caryl Churchill works, St. Joan as a montage performance piece and productions incorporating music, dance and media projection in collaboration with the other three departments of the Jordan College of Fine Arts. Each summer a professional artist is invited to present a two-week intensive course on a topic not covered in the usual academic text. This has included work with Italian and Russian directors, an Indian classical dancer, Australian installation artists and a multi-national montage performance group. Butler Theater's web page is: [2] Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Caryl Churchill (born September 3, 1938) is an English writer of stage plays known for her use of non-realistic techniques and feminist themes. ...


Athletics

An interior panorama of Butler University's Hinkle Fieldhouse, constructed in 1928, during a game between the Bulldogs and the University of Wisconsin Green Bay.
An interior panorama of Butler University's Hinkle Fieldhouse, constructed in 1928, during a game between the Bulldogs and the University of Wisconsin Green Bay.

Butler University's athletic teams, known as the Bulldogs, compete in the NCAA Division I Horizon League. Butler's basketball arena, Hinkle Fieldhouse, was the largest basketball arena in the US for several decades. It is considered a Hoosier Hysteria icon: from its opening in 1928 until 1971, it was the site of the final rounds of the Indiana state high school basketball tournament. Butler holds two national championships in men's basketball; one from 1924, and one from 1929. [3] Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ... The Butler Bulldogs are the teams that represent Butler University in U.S. NCAA Division I athletic competition. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


In 1954, Butler hosted the historic final when Milan High School (enrollment 161) defeated Muncie High School [now Muncie Central] (enrollment over 1,600) to win the state title. The state final depicted in the 1986 movie Hoosiers, loosely based on the Milan Miracle story, was shot in Hinkle Fieldhouse. A renovation of the Butler Bowl (football stadium) is now finished and includes field turf, which allows the Butler Bowl to host football, soccer, and other events. Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Milan is a town in Ripley County, Indiana, United States. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ... Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ...


The 2006-2007 men's Butler basketball team won the NIT Season Tip-Off, which in part helped them to be named one of the top 12 underdog sports stories of 2006 by ESPN. [4]For the third time in six years, the Bulldogs won their first ten games. Butler finished the regular season ranked No. 19 in both the latest ESPN/USA Today Coaches and AP Top 25 Polls. [5] [6] The Butler program has traditionally been one of the best of the so-called "mid-major" basketball programs over the last decade, having won at least 20 games and reached postseason play eight of the last ten seasons, including five NCAA Tournaments.[7] The now-unique style of team play that many have said harkens back to the Hoosier glory days, as well as being called the way the game should be played, has been dubbed "The Butler Way" by the Bulldog program. [8][9] During the 06-07 season, Butler junior guard AJ Graves was named a Wooden Award National Player of the Year finalist in men's college basketball, while Head Coach Todd Lickliter was also awarded the 2006-07 mid-season Jim Phelan National Coach of the Year[10] and the National Association of Basketball Coaches National Coach of the Year honors. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The NIT Season Tip-Off is an annual college basketball tournament that takes place in November of each year, around the beginning of the season. ... Mid Major is a term mainly used in American college basketball and to a lesser extent college football to describe schools not affiliated with a BCS or other major conference. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... The John R. Wooden Award is an award given annually to outstanding mens and womens college basketball players. ... Todd Lickliter (born April 17, 1955) is the head coach of the University of Iowa Hawkeyes mens basketball team. ... Jim Phelan (born March 19, 1929 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA) was a collegiate basketball coach. ... The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri was founded in 1927 by Phog Allen, the University of Kansas basketball coach. ...


In the 2007 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament Butler earned a 5th seed, the highest seed in the school's history. It's previous highest seed was 10th in 2001. Butler was ranked in the AP Top 25 throughout the 2006-2007 season, and as high as No. 9, another school record. In the first round of the Midwest Regional, Butler defeated 12th seeded Old Dominion University 57-46. In round two of the Midwest Regional, Butler defeated the 4th seeded Maryland by a score of 62 to 59, earning a trip to the Sweet Sixteen in St. Louis, MO to play #1 seed University of Florida. This marked the second time in five years and the third time in the school's history that Butler has reached the Sweet Sixteen. The 2007 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 NCAA schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public research university located in Norfolk, Virginia, U.S. It was established in 1930 as the Norfolk Division of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... Sweet Sixteen can mean: sweet sixteen (birthday), a party thrown in honor of a girls sixteenth birthday in USA Sweet Sixteen (album), an album by The Huntingtons Sweet Sixteen (Royal Trux album), a 1997 album by Royal Trux Sweet Sixteen (Billy Idol song) A song by Feeder, famed as... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Sweet Sixteen can mean: sweet sixteen (birthday), a party thrown in honor of a girls sixteenth birthday in USA Sweet Sixteen (album), an album by The Huntingtons Sweet Sixteen (Royal Trux album), a 1997 album by Royal Trux Sweet Sixteen (Billy Idol song) A song by Feeder, famed as...


Butler reached the Sweet Sixteen as a No. 12 seed in the 2003 NCAA Tournament by defeating No. 5 Mississippi State and No. 4 Louisville, becoming that year's Cinderella. Butler also defeated Wake Forest, 79-63, in the first round of the 2001 NCAA Tournament as a No. 10 seed, while their heartbreaking 69-68 overtime loss to eventual national runner-up Florida in the 2000 tournament as a No. 12 seed has seen regular rotation on TV over the years as an ESPN "Classic." Butler's exclusion as a 25-5 team from the 2002 tournament was also considered by many as the biggest NCAA selection "snub" in several years. [11][12][13] Sweet Sixteen can mean: sweet sixteen (birthday), a party thrown in honor of a girls sixteenth birthday in USA Sweet Sixteen (album), an album by The Huntingtons Sweet Sixteen (Royal Trux album), a 1997 album by Royal Trux Sweet Sixteen (Billy Idol song) A song by Feeder, famed as... The 2003 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... Drill Field on the Mississippi State University campus Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, in the town of Starkville. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... In American and Canadian sports, a Cinderella refers to a team or player who advances much further in a tournament than expected. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... The 2001 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... The 2000 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


Of note, Butler has the best winning percentage and most wins of all D-I men's basketball programs in the state of Indiana over the last decade (21.6 wins per year through 2006), while having won the last six meetings with in-state rival Notre Dame and two of the last four against Indiana University.[14][15] Butler defeated both Notre Dame and Indiana during the 2006-07 regular season, while also defeating in-state rival Purdue to move to 2-0 against the Boilermakers this decade. Butler has also been the defending champion of the Hoosier Classic men's basketball tournament since the 2001-02 season,[16][17] and has advanced to postseason play eight of the last ten years (5 NCAA's, 3 NIT's). Butler has been to six NCAA Tournaments since 1997. [18] For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ...


Butler also has a strong history in soccer. The Bulldogs reached the NCAA Tournaments round of 16 in the sport in both 1995 and 1998. Butler has won the Horizon League (formerly MCC) tournament title in 1995, 1997, 1998, and 2001. The 1998 squad enjoyed national rankings as high as No. 8 in the country.


Some of Butler's most notable athletic accomplishments have come in Cross Country. Butler has won nine straight Horizon League Championships in Men's Cross Country and five straight Women's Championships. The Men's team has placed as high as 4th in the nation in recent years, earning a team trophy at the NCAA Division I championships in 2004. Both teams have frequently qualified for nationals in recent years, placing individuals as high as 3rd (Mark Tucker, 2003). All-Americans from the Butler Cross Country Team include Julius Mwangi, Justin Young, Fraser Thompson (A Rhodes Scholar), Mark Tucker, and Olly Laws. Coach Joe Franklin was named NCAA Division I Coach of the Year for leading the Bulldogs to their 2004 4th place finish.


Fight Song

Butler War Song
We'll sing the Butler war song,
We'll give a fighting cry;
We'll fight the Butler battle--
Bulldogs ever do or die.
And in the glow of the victory firelight,
Hist'ry cannot deny
To add a page or two
For Butler's fighting crew
Beneath the Hoosier sky.

  • Audio Version

Notable alumni

  • Kurt Vonnegut, attended & honorary degree
  • Marguerite Young (author of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and criticism)
  • David Starr Jordan (PhD, President of Indiana University and first president of Stanford University)
  • Bobby Plump (Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame Inductee, and hero of the 1954 Milan High School Championship Basketball Team.)
  • Ed Carpenter (IndyCar Series Driver)
  • Michael Lynn Miles (Walgreens' first pharmacist)
  • George Ryan (former Illinois Governor)
  • Howard Caldwell (long-time Indianapolis TV news anchor)
  • Peter Lupus (actor and bodybuilder)
  • Lance McAllister (Cincinnati talk show host)
  • Corey McPherrin (sportscaster)
  • Thad Matta (Ohio State Men's Basketball Head Coach)
  • Todd Lickliter (University of Iowa Men's Basketball Head Coach)
  • Jim Jones (minister, founder, cult leader People's Temple)
  • John Minko (WFAN update anchor, play-by-play announcer for Army football)
  • Pat Neshek (MLB - Minnesota Twins Pitcher)
  • Johann Sebastian Paetsch (musician and cellist)
  • Robert Marshall (attended; international speed skater)
  • Lawrence Trissel (pharmacist and author of Trissel's Tables)
  • Sarah Fisher (attended; IndyCar Series Driver)
  • Thaddeus Davis (Notable choreographer of contemporary ballet)
  • Dave Calabro,(Current track announcer for Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Sports Director/Anchor for WTHR in Indianapolis)
  • Arthur C. Cope (deceased), American Chemist and originator of the Cope elimination and Cope rearrangement

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Marguerite Vivian Young (August 28, 1908 - November 17, 1995) was an American author of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and criticism. ... David Starr Jordan David Starr Jordan, Ph. ... Ed Carpenter is an Indy Racing League driver born March 3, 1981. ... George Ryan George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ... Peter Lupus as Willy Armitage in Mission:Impossible Peter Lupus is an American bodybuilder and actor, born in Indianapolis, Indiana on June 17, 1932. ... Thad Matta Thad Matta (pronounced MAH-tuh) (born July 11, 1967 in Hoopeston, Illinois) is the current head coach of the Ohio State University mens basketball team. ... Todd Lickliter (born April 17, 1955) is the head coach of the University of Iowa Hawkeyes mens basketball team. ... This article is about the cult leader. ... Brochure of the Peoples Temple portraying cult leader Jim Jones as the loving father of the Rainbow Family. The Peoples Temple was a cult that is best known for a mass suicide at Jonestown, Guyana, on November 18, 1978. ... John Minko is a 20/20 sports anchors on radio station WFAN in New York and has worked there since its inception in 1987. ... Patrick J. Neshek (born September 4, 1980 in Madison, Wisconsin) is a Major League Baseball relief pitcher for the Minnesota Twins. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... Born in Colorado Springs USA on April 11, 1964 of musical parents, Johann Sebastian Paetsch began cello studies with his father Günther Paetsch at the age of 5, giving his first recital when only 6. ... Bob Marshall was a founding member of the Wilderness Society and the first Adirondack 46er. ... Sarah Marie Fisher (born October 4, 1980 (age 26)) is an American auto racing driver competing in the Indy Racing League (IRL) IndyCar Series for Dreyer & Reinbold Racing originally from Commercial Point, Ohio. ... Arthur C. Cope (1909-1966) was a highly successful and influential organic chemist and member of the National Academy of Sciences. ... The Cope reaction or Cope elimination is an elimination reaction of an amine oxide to form an alkene and a hydroxyl amine. ... It has been suggested that Cope reaction be merged into this article or section. ...

Notable faculty

  • Dan Barden, author of John Wayne: A Novel
  • John Beversluis, author of C.S. Lewis and the Search for Rational Religion and Cross Examining Socrates
  • Joe Franklin, 2004 NCAA Division I Cross Country Coach of the Year
  • Jerry Farrell, mathematics professor best-known for designing some famous New York Times crossword puzzles, such as 1996 "Election Day"
  • Paul D. "Tony" Hinkle, developed the orange basketball
  • James Mulholland, prolific composer of choral and instrumental music
  • Arkady Orlovsky, principal cellist of Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra
  • Lauren Smith, actress
  • Dr. Jon Sorenson, mathematician and head of the computer science department
  • Dean Michael Zimmerman, biologist and anti-creationist activist.
  • Rosanna Ruffo, Former dancer with the Mariinski theatre.
  • Jim Phillippe (deceased), Former track announcer for Indianapolis Motor Speedway and recipient of Butler Medal of Honor
  • Gordon Clark (deceased), American philosopher and Calvinist theologian

Joseph Fortgang (born March 9, 1926) is an American radio and television personality who uses the stage name Joe Franklin. ... Jeremiah (Jerry) Farrell (b. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Paul D. Tony Hinkle (December 19, 1899 - September 22, 1992) was an American college basketball coach at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra is an American orchestra based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Jonathan Jon Sorenson, born 1964 in Valparaiso, Indiana is an American academic, the chair of the computer science department and interim chair of the mathematics department at Butler University. ... Michael Zimmerman is an American biologist and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of Biology at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Gordon Haddon Clark (August 31, 1902-April 9, 1985) was an American philosopher and Calvinist theologian. ...

Greek organizations

Fraternities

Sororities Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ...

Honorary Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ...

  • Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity, Alpha Beta Chapter
  • Sigma Rho Delta, National Dance Fraternity/Sorority, Alpha Chapter
  • Tau Beta Sigma, National Honorary Band Sorority, Epsilon Chapter

Professional Fraternites Kappa Kappa Psi is a national honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Tau Beta Sigma is a co-educational national honorary band sorority dedicated to serving college and university bands. ...

Phi Delta Chi (ΦΔΧ) Pharmacy Fraternity was founded on 2 November 1883 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor by 11 men, led by Dean Albert B. Prescott. ... Kappa Psi (ΚΨ) is the oldest and largest professional pharmaceutical fraternity in the world. ...

Points of interest

Holcomb Gardens (20 acres) are located on the Butler University campus at 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Hinkle Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis/Indiana. ... Minoru Yamasaki (December 1, 1912 – February 6, 1986) was an American architect best known for his design of the World Trade Center. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Admission website
  • student bloggers and forums
  • Official athletics website
  • Campus map
  • Butler University Libraries website
  • www.ButlerHoops.com - Mature and intelligent Butler Athletics Discussion

References

  1. 1 endowment  America's Best Colleges 2006. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2006-01-24.
Arcadia University is a private liberal arts university located in Glenside, Pennsylvania, on the outskirts of Philadelphia. ... Belmont University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts university located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. ... Drury University is a private liberal arts college in Springfield, Missouri. ... Elon University is a private, liberal arts university located in Elon, North Carolina. ... Hamline University was founded in 1854 in Red Wing, Minnesota, USA, as the first institution of higher education in the state. ... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. ... Ithaca College is a private institution of higher education located on the South Hill of Ithaca, New York. ... North Central College is a private, 4-year comprehensive liberal arts college located in Naperville, Illinois. ... The university is located near Tacoma, Washington Pacific Lutheran University is located in the Parkland suburb of Tacoma, Washington. ... Quinnipiac University is a private four-year university in Hamden, Connecticut, located on about 500 acres (2 km²), just north of New Haven. ... Simmons College is a liberal arts womens college in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Susquehanna University is a national liberal arts college in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 50 miles north of the state capital, Harrisburg. ... The Sage Colleges are three educational institutions in New York founded by Russell Sage. ... The University of Redlands is a private liberal arts and sciences university located in Redlands, California. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ... Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso, Indiana. ... Wagner College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located on Staten Island in New York City. ... Westminster College, Salt Lake City, or simply Westminster College is a four year accredited liberal arts college located in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It also offers four graduate programs. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
butler: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (954 words)
Butlers used to always be attired in a special uniform, distinct from the livery of junior servants, but today a butler is more likely to wear a business suit or business casual clothing and appear in uniform only on special occasions.
The earliest literary mention of a butler is probably that of the man whose release from prison was predicted by Joseph in the biblical account of Joseph's interpretation of the dreams of the Pharaoh's servants.
Butlers may provide comic relief with wry comments, clues as to the perpetrators of various crimes and are represented and as at least as intelligent and moral, or even more so, than their “betters”.
Butler University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (503 words)
Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana (USA), founded by abolitionist and attorney Ovid Butler in 1855.
It was there that the school was renamed Butler University "in recognition of Ovid Butler's inspirational vision, determined leadership, and financial support." In 1922, they purchased Fairview Park, and in 1928, moved their campus to the current Fairview location.
Butler University offers value in education: high standards and expectations for students are paired with a maximum amount of individual attention.
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