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Encyclopedia > Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970). 1991 paperback edition published by Vintage. 487 pages
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970). 1991 paperback edition published by Vintage. 487 pages
"Bury my heart at Wounded Knee" is also the title of a song by Buffy Sainte-Marie.

Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, first published in 1970, is a history of Native Americans in the American West in the late nineteenth century, and their displacement and slaughter by the United States. Image File history File links Bury_my. ... Image File history File links Bury_my. ... 7 Buffy Sainte-Marie Buffy Sainte-Marie (born February 20, 1941) is a Canadian First Nations musician, composer, visual artist, educator and social activist. ... Dee Brown (February 29, 1908---December 12, 2002) was an American novelist and historian. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... HIStory: Past, Present and Future – Book I is a two-disc album by Michael Jackson released in 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc (HIStory Begins) is a fifteen-track greatest hits (later released as Greatest Hits - HIStory Volume I), while the second disc (HIStory... An Aani (Atsina) named Assiniboin Boy. ...


"Bury my heart at Wounded Knee" is the final phrase of a 19th-century poem titled "American Names" by Stephen Vincent Benet. (The poem was not actually about the Indian wars.) The full quotation, "I shall not be here/I shall rise and pass/Bury my heart at Wounded Knee," appears at the beginning of Brown's book. Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898–March 13, 1943) was a United States author, poet, short story writer and novelist, best known for his narrative poem of the American Civil War, John Browns Body, published in 1928. ...


Chapter by chapter, this book moves from tribe to tribe of Native Americans, and outlines the relations of the tribes to the United States federal government during the years 1860-1890. It begins with the Navajos, the Apaches, and the other tribes of the Southwest who were displaced as California and the surrounding states were settled. Brown chronicles the changing and sometimes conflicting attitudes both of American authorities such as General Custer and Indian chiefs, particularly Geronimo, Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, and Crazy Horse, and their different attempts to save their peoples, by peace, war, or retreat. The later part of the book focuses primarily on the Sioux and Cheyenne tribes of the plains, who were among the last to be moved onto reservations, under perhaps the most violent circumstances. It culminates with the Battle of the Little Bighorn, the murders of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, and the slaughter of Sioux prisoners at Wounded Knee, South Dakota that is generally considered the end of the Indian Wars. The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... The Navajo (also Navaho) people of the southwestern United States call themselves the Diné (pronounced ), which roughly means the people. They speak the Navajo language, and many are members of the Navajo Nation, an independent government structure which manages the Navajo reservation in the Four Corners area of the United... It has been suggested that Traditional Apache scout be merged into this article or section. ... George Armstrong Custer George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was an American cavalry commander in the Civil War and the Indian Wars who is best remembered for his defeat and death at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against a coalition of Native American tribes, led by... Geronimo Geronimo (Chiricahua Goyaałé One Who Yawns; often spelled Goyathlay in English) (June 16, 1829–February 17, 1909) was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who warred against the encroachment of the United States on his tribal lands and people for over 25 years. ... Red Cloud Red Cloud Red Cloud (Lakota: Makhpyia-luta), (1822 – December 10, 1909) was a war leader of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). ... Portrait of Sitting Bull taken in 1885 by D. F. Barry Sitting Bull (Sioux: Tatanka Iyotake or Tatanka Iyotanka or Ta-Tanka I-Yotank, first named Hunkesni, Slow), (c. ... Crazy Horse (Lakota: T‘ašunka Witko, pronounced tkhashúnka witkó), (c. ... The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also called Custers Last Stand, was an engagement between a Lakota-Cheyenne combined force and the 7th Cavalry of the United States Army that took place on June 25, 1876 near the Little Bighorn River in the eastern Montana Territory. ... Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 153 killed 50 wounded 150 missing 25 killed 39 wounded The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict between the Lakota Sioux and the United States, subsequently described... Wounded Knee is a census-designated place located in Shannon County, South Dakota. ... Combatants Native Americans Various (see text) Indian Wars is the name used by historians in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the United States and Native American peoples (Indians) of North America. ...

Contents

Impact of the Book

It is difficult to overstate the impact of the book. Prior to its publication in 1970, the dominant images of the period were of noble settlers threatened by savage Indians and defended by the 7th Cavalry. The book brought to the public's attention the other side of the story: that the original owners of the land were systematically massacred, betrayed and forced onto only those scraps of land that the more numerous and technologically superior conquerors disdained. Distinctive Unit Insignia, US 7th Cavalry The United States 7th Cavalry Regiment is a United States Army cavalry regiment, whose lineage traces back to the mid-19th century. ...


One strength of the book is its strong documentation to original sources. Its message may not have been a welcome one, but it came loaded with facts. The other strength is that each chapter forms a story, compelling as any fiction and far more interesting than academic treatises.


Chapters

  1. "Their Manners are Decorous and Praiseworthy"
  2. The Long Walk of the Navahos
  3. Little Crow's War
  4. War Comes to the Cheyennes
  5. Powder River Invasion
  6. Red Cloud's War
  7. "The Only Good Indian is a Dead Indian"
  8. The Rise and Fall of Donehogawa
  9. Cochise and the Apache Guerrillas
  10. The Ordeal of Captain Jack
  11. The War to Save the Buffalo
  12. The War for the Black Hills
  13. The Flight of Nez Perc├ęs
  14. Cheyenne Exodus
  15. Standing Bear Becomes a Person
  16. "The Utes Must Go!"
  17. The Last of the Apache Chiefs
  18. Dance of the Ghosts
  19. Wounded Knee

The Navajo (also Navaho) people of the southwestern United States call themselves the Diné (pronounced ), which roughly means the people. They speak the Navajo language, and many are members of the Navajo Nation, an independent government structure which manages the Navajo reservation in the Four Corners area of the United... Taoyateduta, known as Little Crow Taoyateduta (1810?–July 3, 1863) was a chief of the Mdewakanton Sioux tribe. ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 The Cheyenne are a Native American nation of the Great Plains, closely allied with the Arapaho and loosely allied with the Lakota (Sioux). ... Red Cloud Red Cloud Red Cloud (Lakota: Makhpyia-luta), (1822 – December 10, 1909) was a war leader of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux). ... Ely S. Parker Ely Samuel Parker (1828 - August 31, 1895), Hasanoanda, was an Iroquois of the Seneca tribe born at Indian Falls, New York (then part of the Tonawanda Reservation). ... Dragoon Mountains where Cochise hid with his warriors Cochise (A-da-tli-chi = hardwood, also Cheis) (c. ... It has been suggested that Traditional Apache scout be merged into this article or section. ... For the music group, see Captain Jack (music). ... The Nez Perce or Nez Percé (pronounced , or as in French) are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited the Pacific Northwest region of the United States at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... Standing Bear Standing Bear (1834(?) - 1908) was a Ponca Native American Indian chief who successfully argued in U.S. District Court in 1879 that American Indians are persons within the meaning of the law and have the rights of citizenship. ... The Utes (/juːts/; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... The Ghost Dance by the Ogalala Lakota at Pine Ridge Noted in historical accounts as the Ghost Dance of 1890, the Ghost Dance was a religious ritual incorporated into numerous Native American belief systems beginning in 1889. ... Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 153 killed 50 wounded 150 missing 25 killed 39 wounded The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict between the Lakota Sioux and the United States, subsequently described...

See also

Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 153 killed 50 wounded 150 missing 25 killed 39 wounded The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict between the Lakota Sioux and the United States, subsequently described...

External links

  • Summary and author biography on Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

  Results from FactBites:
 
PlanetPapers - Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (793 words)
Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a fully documented account of the annihilation of the American Indian in the late 1800s ending at the Battle of Wounded Knee.
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a work of non-fiction, attempts to tell the story of the American West from the perspective of the indigenous population, The American Indian.
Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a wonderfully written and insightful piece of American literature.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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