FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bursa (Anatomy)
Bursae visible top right and bottom right
Bursae visible top right and bottom right

A bursa (plural bursae or bursas; Latin: Bursa synovialis) is a small fluid-filled sac located at the point where a muscle or tendon slides across bone. Bursae serve to reduce friction between the two moving surfaces. There are hundreds of them throughout the body. Bursa is Latin for purse, which is what a bursa resembles. Image File history File links Gray350. ... Image File history File links Gray350. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle (from Latin musculus little mouse [1]) is contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. ... A tendon (or fatty) is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone, or muscle to muscle and is designed to withstand tension. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ...


Infection or irritation of a bursa leads to bursitis (inflammation of a bursa). The general term for disease of bursae is "bursopathy". Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae, or small sacs of synovial fluid, in the body. ...


See also

In birds, the bone marrow is the site of hematopoiesis and the bursa of Fabricius (Latin: Bursa cloacalis or Bursa fabricii) is a specialized organ that, as first demonstrated by Bruce Glick and later by Max Cooper and Robert Good, is necessary for B cell development. ... “Aves” redirects here. ... A bursa is a small sac filled with synovial fluid that cushions adjacent structures and reduces friction. ... The bursae near the knee-joint are the following: In front there are four bursæ: a large one is interposed between the patella and the skin, a small one between the upper part of the tibia and the ligamentum patellæ, a third between the lower part of the tuberosity of...

External links

JOHN IS A fAG GPnotebook is a British medical database for general practitioners (GPs. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (609x1165, 138 KB) Plastische Anatomie des menschlichen Körpers für Künstler und freunde der kunst von Dr. Julius Kollmann o. ... The musculoskeletal system is an organ system that gives animals the ability to physically move, by using the muscles and skeletal system. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bursa (anatomy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (115 words)
A bursa (plural bursae or bursas; Latin: Bursa synovialis) is a small fluid-filled sac located at the point where a muscle or tendon slides across bone.
Infection of a bursa leads to bursitis (inflammation of a bursa).
Bursa of Fabricius (a lymphatic organ in birds)
XI. Splanchnology. 2e. The Abdomen. Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. (5475 words)
Formerly the main portion of the cavity was described as the greater, and the omental bursa as the lesser sac.
(b) Omental Bursa (bursa omentalis; lesser peritoneal sac).—On the posterior abdominal wall the peritoneum of the general cavity is continuous with that of the omental bursa in front of the inferior vena cava.
Starting from here, the bursa may be traced across the aorta and over the medial part of the front of the left kidney and diaphragm to the hilus of the spleen as the anterior layer of the phrenicolienal ligament.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m