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Burgh (pronounced burruh) represents an autonomous corporate entity, usually a town, and has been in use in Scotland since the 12th century. Recognition of burgh status has now, however, little more than ceremonial value. Image File history File links Linlithgow_Burgh_sign. ... Image File history File links Linlithgow_Burgh_sign. ... Location within the British Isles Linlithgow town in the background, the Loch in the mid-ground with the Palace in the foreground Linlithgow (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Iucha, Lowland Scots Lithgae) is a town and Royal Burgh in Scotland. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


The titular head of a burgh is called a Provost. Most royal burghs retain the title for ceremonial purposes, with the notable exception of the Scottish cities. A provost (introduced into Scots from French) was the leader of a Scottish burgh council, the equivalent of a mayor in other parts of the English-speaking world. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ...


Burghs had rights to representation in the Parliament of Scotland. Under the Acts of Union of 1707 many became parliamentary burghs, represented in the Parliament of Great Britain. The parliament of Scotland, officially the Estates of Parliament, was the legislature of the independent Kingdom of Scotland. ... The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 1 May) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... A burgh constituency is a type of parliamentary constituency in Scotland. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


Under the Reform Acts of 1832, 32 years after the merger of the Parliament of Great Britain into the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the boundaries of burghs for parliamentary elections ceased to be necessarily their boundaries for other purposes. The Reform Act of 1832 (known also as the Great Reform Act and The Parliamentary Reform Act 1832) introduced wide-ranging changes to electoral franchise legislation in the United Kingdom. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ...


When Scottish county councils were created under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1889 burghs were already important in the local government of Scotland. County councils and burgh councils were both abolished under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, which created a new system of regions and districts and island council areas. In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1888 (52 & 53 Vict. ... The local government of Scotland is organised into 32 unitary authorities covering the mainland and islands of Scotland. ... The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (1973 c. ... The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... There were three island council areas of Scotland: Orkney Shetland Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) The island council areas date from 1975, but unitary council areas were not created throughout the rest of Scotland until 1996. ...

Contents


Types of Burgh

There are several types of burgh, including;

A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... A burgh of regality is a type of Scottish town (burgh). ... A burgh of barony is a type of Scottish town (burgh). ... A burgh constituency is a type of parliamentary constituency in Scotland. ... A police burgh was a Scottish burgh which had adopted a “police system” for governing the town. ...

Etymology

As used in this article, the word burgh is derived from Scots language and refers to corporate entities whose legality is peculiar to Scotland. (Scottish law was protected and preserved as distinct from laws of England under the Acts of Union of 1707.) Pronunciation is the same as for the English word borough, which is a near cognate of the Scots word. A word is a unit of language that carries meaning and consists of one or more morphemes which are linked more or less tightly together. ... Scots is an Anglic variety spoken in Scotland, where it is sometimes called Lowland Scots to distinguish it from Scottish Gaelic spoken by some in the Highlands and Islands (especially the Hebrides). ... See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... See also Portal:Law The stela of King Hammurabi depicts the god Shamash revealing a code of laws to the king. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi   - Water (%) Population... The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament passed in 1707 (taking effect on 1 May) by the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A borough is an administrative division used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The word has cognates, or near cognates, in other Germanic languages. For example, burg in German, and borg in both Danish and Swedish; the equivalent word is also to be found in Frisian, Dutch, Norwegian, and Icelandic. The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... -burg occurs on the end of many German placenames. ... The Borg or Borg Collective is a race of cybernetic organisms in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Frisian is a Germanic group of closely related languages, spoken by about half a million members of an ethnic group living on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany. ...


The Scots language burgh and the English language borough are derived from the Old English language word burh (whose dative singular and nominative/accusative plural form byrig sometimes underlies modern place-names, and which had dialectal variants including burg; it was also sometimes confused with beorh, beorg, 'mound, hill', on which see Hall 2001, 69-70). The Old English word was originally used for a fortified town or proto-castle (eg at Dover Castle or Burgh Castle) and was related to the verb beorgan (cf. Dutch and German bergen), meaning "to keep, save, make secure". In German Burg means castle, though so many towns grew up around castles that it almost came to mean city, and is incorporated into many placenames, such as Hamburg and Strasbourg), Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... -burg occurs on the end of many German placenames. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... A castle (from the Latin castellum) is a structure that is fortified for defence against an enemy and generally serves as a military headquarters dominating the surrounding countryside[1]. The term is most often applied to a small self-contained fortress, usually of the Middle Ages. ... Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... Burgh Castle is a village on the River Waveney, near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England within The Broads National Park. ... A castle (from the Latin castellum) is a structure that is fortified for defence against an enemy and generally serves as a military headquarters dominating the surrounding countryside[1]. The term is most often applied to a small self-contained fortress, usually of the Middle Ages. ... Night view of Taipei City. ... In geography and cartography, a toponym is a place name, a geographical name, a proper name of locality, region, or some other part of Earths surface or its natural or artificial feature. ... Hamburgs Motto: May the posterity endeavour with dignity to conserve the freedom, which the forefathers acquired. ... City flag City coat of arms Coordinates : , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Département Bas-Rhin (67) Région Alsace Mayor Fabienne Keller (UMP) (since 2001) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg City (commune) Characteristics Land Area 78. ...


A number of other European languages have cognate words which were borrowed from the Germanic languages during the Middle Ages, including brog in Irish, bwr or bwrc, meaning "wall, rampart" in Welsh, bourg in French, borgo in Italian, and burgo in Spanish (hence the place-name Burgos). World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... There is a quarter in Rome, see Borgo (quarter of Rome) There are communes that have the name Borgo in Italy: Borgo a Mozzano, in the province of Lucca Borgo dAle, in the province of Vercelli Borgo di Terzo, in the province of Bergamo Borgo Pace, in the province... The cathedral Our Lady of Burgos. ...


The most obviously derivative words are burgher in English and B├╝rger in German (both literally citizen, with connotations of middle-class in English and other Germanic languages). Also related are the words bourgeois and belfry (both from the French), and burglar; more distantly, it is related to words meaning hill or mountain in a number of languages (cf. the second element of iceberg). Burgher can refer to: A title. ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... The term Belfry has a variety of uses: For the architectural term see:Belfry (architecture) For the U.S. town in Montana see Belfry, Montana For the English golf club see The De Vere Belfry There is also a German Epic Metal band called Belfry. ... Burglary is a crime related to United States burglary is a felony and involves trespassing, or entering a building with intent to commit any crime, not necessarily a felony or theft. ... A hill in Hungary with a hillside vintage garden For the landform that extends less than 600 metres above the surrounding terrain and that is smaller than a mountain, see the mountain article. ... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska (USA) has the largest visible base-to-summit elevation difference on Earth. ... Look up Cf. ... An iceberg off Antarctica An iceberg (a partial loan translation, probably from Dutch ijsberg (literally: mountain of ice),[1] cognate to German Eisberg) is a large piece of ice that has broken off from a snow-formed glacier or ice shelf and is floating in open water. ...


Burgh as an element in placenames

Burgh is commonly used as a suffix in place names, in Scotland and other countries to which Scots emigrated: Look up affix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Emigration is the action and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ...

And as a placename on its own, in the West Germanic countries: Edinburgh (pronounced ; Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic) is Scotlands capital, and its second-largest city. ... Fraserburgh is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... Helensburgh (Baile Eilidh in Gaelic) is a Scottish town historically part of Dunbartonshire, but since local government reorganisation in 1995 in Argyll and Bute, on the north shore of the Firth of Clyde. ... Location within the British Isles Jedburgh (Referred to locally Jedart or Jethart) is a royal burgh in the Scottish Borders, lying on the Jed Water, a tributary of the River Teviot. ... The second largest village on Harris after Tarbert, Is best approached by bike or car via the west coast road, where you can experience the most beautiful beaches in the world. ... Fort William (Gaelic: An Gearasdan) is the largest town in the west highlands of Scotland. ... Musselburgh is a town in East Lothian, Scotland, on the coast of the Firth of Forth, six miles east of Edinburgh city centre. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Historically, the Royal Burgh of Roxburgh (Gaelic: Rosbrog), in the Scottish Borders, was an important trading burgh in the economy of Scotland. ... Williamsburgh is a place name, derived from the name William and the Scots language and Scottish English word burgh: Williamsburgh, Paisley, a residential area in Paisley, Scotland, originally a separate village outwith the boundary of the ancient Burgh of Paisley Williamsburg, Brooklyn, originally called Williamsburgh from 1802-1855 Rockville, Maryland... Kingsburgh is a resort town in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Steel City Location Location in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Coordinates , Government Country State County United States Pennsylvania Allegheny County Founded 1758 Mayor Bob OConnor (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 151. ... Alternative meanings at Dunedin (disambiguation) Edinburgh is a town located in Johnson County, Indiana. ... West Germanic is the largest branch of the Germanic family of languages, including such languages as English, Dutch, and German. ...

Burgh () is a town in the Dutch province of Zeeland. ... Schouwen-Duiveland is a municipality and an island in the southwestern Netherlands. ... Burgh is a village and civil parish in the Suffolk Coastal district of Suffolk, England. ... Burgh by Sands is a village and civil parish in the City of Carlisle district of Cumbria, England, situated near the Solway Firth. ... Burgh Castle is a village on the River Waveney, near Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England within The Broads National Park. ... Burgh le Marsh is a village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England, about 4 miles west of Skegness. ... Burgh on Bain is a village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. ... Burgh Island (, ) is a small tidal island off the south coast of Devon in England near to the small seaside village of Bigbury on Sea. ... Fleggburgh is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk, sometimes also known as Burgh St Margaret. ...

See also


A burgh (pronounced burruh) is the Scots language equivalent of the English language borough. ... English Regis Bere Regis Bognor Regis Grafton Regis Houghton Regis Lyme Regis Melcombe Regis Rowley Regis Wyke Regis Royal Royal Berkshire Royal Leamington Spa Royal Tunbridge Wells Royal Borough Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead Former Royal Borough... The Five Burghs or more usually The Five Boroughs or The Five Boroughs of the Danelaw were the five main towns of Danish Mercia. ... A borough is an administrative division used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ...

Country subdivisions
Administrative divisions - Political divisions - Census divisions - Electoral divisions
Bailiwick | Banner | Block | Borough | Burgh | Canton | Circle | Circuit | City | Commune | Community | Constituency | County | Council | Croft | Department | District | Division | Duchy | Governorate | Hamlet | Hundred | Municipality | Neighbourhood | Parish | Periphery | Prefecture | Province | Region | Republic | Shire | State | Subdistrict | Subprefecture | Territory | Town | Township | Village | Voivodship | Ward
Administrative: county
Autonomous: banner | city | community | county | district | prefecture | province | region | republic | ward
Capital: district | region | territory
Census: division | subdivision
City: council | district
Civil: parish | township
County: borough
Federal: capital | dependencies | capital district | capital territory
Local: administrative unit | council | Government Area
Metropolitan: borough | county | district
National: capital district | capital territory | territory
Imperial: circle | free city | province
(Native) Indian: reserve | reservation
Regional: municipality | county municipality | municipal district
Rural: council | district | municipality | sanitary district
Residential: community
Special: region | administrative region | capital district
Urban: area (US: Urbanized Area) | district | sanitary district
[edit] See also: List of terms for sub-national entities, List of subnational entities, Matrix of subnational entities

Country subdivision can be any type of subdividing the territory of a country. ... A political division is a geographic region accepted to be in the jurisdiction of a particular government entity. ... Outline map of Canadas Census Divisions in 2001 Note: This page refers only to subdivisions in Canada. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... A bailiwick is the area of jurisdiction of a bailiff. ... may refer to Banner (Inner Mongolia) Sanjak Categories: Government stubs | Subnational entities ... A block is a subnational entity in some South Asian countries. ... A borough is an administrative division used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ... A canton is a territorial subdivision of a country, e. ... Circle is an administrative country subdivision. ... // Circuits in the common law In law, a circuit is an appellate judicial district commonly seen in the court systems of many nations. ... Night view of Taipei City. ... A commune is an administrative subdivision of various European and African countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Poland, Romania, Senegal, and the Scandinavian countries. ... A community as subnational entity can be found in Belgium. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Council may refer to a Local government area in Australian English Categories: | ... A croft is a fenced or enclosed area of land, usually small and arable with a crofters dwelling thereon. ... A department is geographic area of a centralized country which functions as an administrative unit. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ... A division is a subnational entity. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... A governorate is a subnational entity. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ... A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. ... A municipality or general-purpose district (compare with: special-purpose district) is an administrative local area generally composed of a clearly defined territory and commonly referring to a city, town, or village government. ... Neighbourhood is a creative-euphoric musical project led by Fabian Szewczyk and Greg Ganczewski (UK/Poland). ... Parish Hall of St. ... Periphery is an administrative division in Greece. ... The term prefecture (from the Latin Praefectura) indicates the office, seat, territorial circonscription of a Prefect; consequentally, like that word, is its applied in English in relation to actual Prefects, whose title is just that (or the forms it takes in other, especially Romance, languages), in the broadest sense in... Province is a name for a subnational entity. ... Region can be used to mean either: any more or less well-defined geographical area of a country or continent, defined by geography, culture or history in political geography, an administrative subdivision of a country or of the European Union. ... In a broad definition a republic is a state or country that is led by people who do not base their political power on any principle beyond the control of the people of that state or country. ... A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain and Australia. ... Most countries with a federal constitution are made up of a number of entities called states. ... The Subdistrict is one of the smallest Political_divisions_of_China. ... Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ... Types of political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... The term township is used to denote a lower level territorial subdivision. ... A village is a human residential settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... A Voivodship (also voivodeship, Romanian: voievodat, Polish: województwo, Serbian: vojvodstvo or vojvodina) was a feudal state in medieval Romania, Hungary, Poland, Russia and Serbia (see Vojvodina), ruled by a Voivod (voivode). ... In Australia, Canada, Ireland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, a ward is an electoral area of a borough, city, council, county, district, parish, shire or town (Local Government Area). ... An administrative county is an administrative area in the British Isles. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... A banner (Mongolian: khoshuu, Chinese: 旗, pinyin: qí) is an administrative division of Inner Mongolia. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... Spains fifty provinces (provincias) are grouped into seventeen autonomous communities (comunidades aut nomas), in addition to two African autonomous cities (ciudades aut nomas) (Ceuta and Melilla). ... In the context of Political divisions of China, county is the standard English translation of 县 (xi  n). ... An autonomous region or autonomous district is a subnational region with special powers of self-rule. ... Prefecture, in the context of China, is used to refer to several unrelated political divisions in both ancient and modern China. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... An autonomous region or autonomous district is a subnational region with special powers of self-rule. ... A significant number of autonomous republics can be found within the successor states of the Soviet Union, but the majority are located within Russia. ... The Capital District is an imprecise regional definition (much like Upstate New York) that generally refers to the four counties surrounding Albany, the capital of New York: Schenectady County, Albany County, Saratoga County and Rensselaer County. ... Capital Region is a common term for the region or district surrounding a state, provincial or national capital city. ... A capital territory is normally a specially designated territory where a countrys seat of government is located. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Outline map of Canadas Census Divisions in 2001 Note: This page refers only to subdivisions in Canada. ... Night view of Taipei City. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... City district can be found as official designation for a country subdivision in Pakistan See also City Districts of Pakistan Category: ... In England a civil parish (usually just parish) is the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... A civil township is a widely-used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a county. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... ... The Federal Dependencies of Venezuela encompass all of Venezuelas off shore islands in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Venezuela. ... The Federal Capital Territory may refer to: the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria the former name for the Australian Capital Territory ... Local governments are administrative offices of an area smaller than a state. ... Generally, a local administrative unit (LAU) is an area of governmental administration below a province, region, state or other major national subdivision. ... A Local Council (LC, formerly Resistance Council -RC) is a form of local elected government within the districts of Uganda. ... Local Government Area (abbreviated LGA) is a term used in Australia (and especially by the Australian Bureau of Statistics) to refer to areas controlled by each individual Local Government. ... A Metropolitan Borough (or Metropolitan District) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... National Capital District may refer to National Capital District, Papua New Guinea ... National capital territories exists in many countries, such as Australia (Australian Capital Territory), Brazil (Federal District of Brazil), India (National Capital Territory of Delhi), Pakistan (Islamabad Capital Territory) and the United States (District of Columbia). ... National Territory is the translation of the Territorio nacional a term used for territories in Argentina. ... A map of the Imperial Circles as at the beginning of the 16th century. ... In the Holy Roman Empire, an imperial free city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... An imperial province was a Roman province where the Emperor had the sole right to appoint governors. ... In Canada, an Indian reserve is specified by the Indian Act as a tract of land, the legal title to which is vested in Her Majesty, that has been set apart by Her Majesty for the use and benefit of a band. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A regional municipality (or region) is a type of Canadian municipal government which works much like a county; the method of government depends on how it is defined. ... Following is a list of the regional county municipalites, territories, and newly amalgamated cities (villes) in the province of Quebec. ... Municipal Districts are Census subdivision used in Canada for the administration of rural areas including farmlands and unincorporated places such as hamlets. ... Rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... In local government on the British Isles, a rural district was a predominantly rural area used for local government. ... A rural municipality is a form of municipality in the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. ... Sanitary Districts were established in England and Wales in 1875 and in Ireland in 1878. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... A residential community is a community, usually a small town or city, that is composed mostly of residents, as opposed to commercial businesses and/or industrial facilities, all three of which are considered to be the three main types of occupants of the typical community. ... Look up special in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) (Simplified Chinese: 特别行政区; Traditional Chinese: 特別行政區; pinyin: tèbié xíngzhèngqÅ«; Cantonese IPA: /tɐk6piːt6 hɐŋ4tsɪŋ3kʰɵy1/; Jyutping: dak6bit6 hang4zing3keoi1; Yale: dahkbiht hàhngjingkeÅ«i) is a political subdivision of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Special capital district is an administrative country subdivision term used for the capital areas in some countries. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Urbanized area (or urban area) is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... Sanitary Districts were established in England and Wales in 1875 and in Ireland in 1878. ... English This is a list of English-language terms for sub-national entities. ... This is a list of current subnational entities, some of which may be states in the legal sense of the word, by country: See also: ISO 3166-2 country subdivision codes based on ISO 3166-1 country codes. ... The following is a matrix of the primary subnational entities. ...

References

  • Hall, Alaric, 'Old MacDonald had a Fyrm, eo, eo, y: Two Marginal Developments of < eo > in Old and Middle English', Quaestio: Selected Proceedings of the Cambridge Colloquium in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, 2 (2001), 60-90.

  Results from FactBites:
 
§3. Burgh. VIII. The English Chaucerians. Vol. 2. The End of the Middle Ages. The Cambridge History of English ... (448 words)
Burgh is said to have had his education at Oxford, and, probably, had his extraction from Essex, where he was, in 1440, made rector of Sandon.
His favourite metre is rime royal, which he manages with all the staggering irregularity common to English poets of the fifteenth century, and not fully explicable by the semi-animate condition of the final -e and some other things of the kind.
Burgh’s earlier equivalents for the so-called decasyllable vary numerically from seven syllables to fourteen: no principle of metrical equivalence and substitution being for the most part able to effect even a tolerable correspondence between their rhythm, which is constantly of the following kind:
Burgh - LoveToKnow 1911 (954 words)
His grandson and successor William, the 3rd earl (1326-1333), was the son of John de Burgh by Elizabeth, lady of Clare, sister and co-heir of the last Clare earl of Hertford (d.
She was married in childhood to Lionel, son of Edward III., who was recognized in her right as earl of Ulster, and their direct representative, the duke of York, ascended the throne in 1461 as Edward IV., since when the earldom of Ulster has been only held by members of the royal family.
The lords Burgh or Borough of Gainsborough (1487-1599) were a Lincolnshire family believed to be descended from a younger son of Hubert de Burgh.
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