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Encyclopedia > Bunjevci
Bunjevci
Total population 80,000 approx. (many declare as Croats, Yugoslavs, and even as Hungarians)
Regions with significant populations Serbia:
20,000 (2002 census)

Hungary:
about 1,500 (2001 census) Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav (Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic: Југословени, Latin: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Republic  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica  - President Boris Tadić Establishment    - Formation 814   - First Serbian Uprising 1804   - Internationally recognized July 13, 1878   - Kingdom of SCS created December 1, 1918   - SCG dissolved...

Language Bunjevac language - Ikavian Shtokavian (Note: In 2002 census in Serbia, some of them declared to speak Bunjevac, while others declared to speak Serbian or Croatian) [1]
Religion Roman Catholic Christian.
Related ethnic groups other Slavic peoples, especially Croats
The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik
The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik

Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunye'vtzi and Bunye'vatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (Bács-Kiskun county, particularly in the Baja region). They are Roman Catholic by faith although not all practicing. Ethnically, they register themselves either as a separate Bunjevci ethnic group or as Croats and Yugoslavs, while some also register as Serbs or Magyars. Bunjevac language or Bunjevac dialect (Bunjevački jezik or Bunjevački dijalekat) is a language/dialect spoken by Bunjevac ethnic group in Vojvodina province of Serbia and Montenegro. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shtokavian (Štokavian, štokavski) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... Countries inhabited predominantly by Slavic peoples The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Eastern Europe. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Author:Sors bona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bunjevci Stari Žednik Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Author:Sors bona File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bunjevci Stari Žednik Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Stari Žednik Stari Žednik (Стари Жедник) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Bunjevac language or Bunjevac dialect (Bunjevački jezik or Bunjevački dijalekat) is a language/dialect spoken by Bunjevac ethnic group in Vojvodina province of Serbia and Montenegro. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in black) Distribution of Slavic peoples by language The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) The Dinaric Alps or Dinarides (Italian: Alpi Dinariche; Croatian and Serbian: Dinaridi or Dinarsko gorje/Динариди or Динарско горје; Slovenian: Dinarsko gorstvo) form a mountain chain in... Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Republic  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica  - President Boris Tadić Establishment    - Formation 814   - First Serbian Uprising 1804   - Internationally recognized July 13, 1878   - Kingdom of SCS created December 1, 1918   - SCG dissolved... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Bács-Kiskun is a county (megye in Hungarian) located in southern Hungary. ... Baja is a city in southern Hungary, located about 150 km south of Budapest, on the river Danube. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav (Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic: Југословени, Latin: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Etymology

There are several explanations for their name, although none of them is certain.


The most common explanation is that the name comes from the river Buna in central Herzegovina, their supposed original homeland before their migrations. This etymology was first proposed by fr. Marijan Lanosović and supported by Vuk Karadžić, Rudolf Horvat, Ivan Ivanić, Ivan Antonović, Istvan Ivanyi, and Mijo Mandić. The Buna is a short river in Bosnia and Herzegovina, left tributary of the Neretva. ... Herzegovina (natively Hercegovina/Херцеговина) is a historical region in the Dinaric Alps that composes the southern part of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Vuk Stefanović Karadžić (Вук Стефановић Караџић) (November 7, 1787 - February 7, 1864) was a Serb linguist and major reformer of the Serbian language. ...


The most credible explanation is based on the common notion of name being given by a population living side by side with them. This would be consistent with the other sub-ethnonyms like Šijaci, Šokci, etc. Another characteristic of such a name is that it was meant as a slur. This etymology was supported by Ivan Kukuljević, fr. Antun Zorica, Đuro Popović, Vaso Glušac, Ivo Milić and Jovan Erdeljanović. In his classical study "On the Origins of Bunjevci" (O poreklu Bunjevaca, Belgrade, 1930), the ethnographer Jovan Erdeljanović proposed that the name was given by the population of Orthodox Serbs who use the verb "bunjati" for speaking indistinguishably (compare with common verb "buncati" with the same meaning). The verb refers not to the population of Bunjevci but to their Catholic priests who served services in Latin unlike the Orthodox priests that used Serbian. It should be noted that the name lost any negative connotation over time, and is no longer used offensively. Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of... Slur could mean: A Slur (music) is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played legato (smoothly). ... Ivan Kukuljević (1816-1889) was a Croatian historian, politician, and patriot. ...


Another explanation is that it comes from the word "bunja", a type of a round house. This was proposed by Bogoslav Kosović. However, this type of house is very rare and is not widely known in inland of Dalmatia or Herzegovina; most of the Bunjevci in these regions never lived in these houses.


History

According to one theory, Bunjevci settled in the city of Subotica and its surroundings in 1526. [1] According to another theory, they migrated into Bačka from their previous location in several groups in 1682, 1686 (when they are noted as the majority of the local Roman Catholic population), and 1687. Bunjevci also live in present-day Lika, western Herzegovina as well as the Dalmatian hinterland (in the region of the mountains of Dinara and Svilaja), but there they do not register as an ethnic group and rather foster a devout sense of Croatdom. Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... Events The League of Augsburg is founded. ... Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... Lika is a mountainous region in central Croatia, roughly bound by the Velebit mountain from the southwest and the PljeÅ¡evica mountain from the northeast. ... Herzegovina (natively Hercegovina/Херцеговина) is a historical region in the Dinaric Alps that composes the southern part of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Map of Dalmatia, in present day Croatia highlighted Dalmatia (Croatian: Dalmacija, French: Dalmatie, German: Dalmatien, Italian: Dalmazia, Serbian Cyrillic: Далмација, Turkish: Dalmaçya, Hungarian: Dalmácia) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Rab in the northwest and the... Dinara is one of the more prominent mountains located on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


Historic documents refer to Bunjevci with various names, some less accurate than others: Catholic Rascians or Rác Catholics, Dalmatians, Bosnians, Catholic Serbs, Vallachs-Catholics, etc. Raci (Раци, Rác, Ratzen, Ratzians, Rasciani) was a name used to designate Serbs and Bunjevci. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Vlachs (also called Wallachians, Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs or Ulahs) is a blanket term covering several modern Latin peoples descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ...


In 1788 the first Austrian population census was conducted - it called Bunjevci Illyrians and their language the Illyrian langage. It listed 17,043 Illyrians in Subotica. In 1850 the Austrian census listed them under Dalmatians and counted 13,894 Dalmatians in the city. Despite this, they traditionally called themselves Bunjevci. The Austro-Hungarian censuses from 1869 onward to 1910 numbered the Bunjevci distinctly. They were referred to as "bunyevácok", "dalmátok" or "Serbs" (in the 1890 census). In 1880 the Austro-Hungarian authorities listed in Subotica a total of 26,637 Bunjevci and Serbs and 31,824 in 1892. In 1910 in the Subotica municipality were registered 33,390 "others" (mainly Bunjevci) a. k. a. 35.29% of the Subotica population. In 1921 Bunjevci were registered by the Royal Serbo-Croat-Slovene authorities as "Serbo-Croats". Subotica municipality had 60,699 Serbo-Croats or 66.73% of the total Subotica population. Allegedly, 44,999 or 49.47% were Bunjevci. In the 1931 population census of the Royal Yugoslav authorities, 43,832 or 44.29% of the total Subotica population were Bunjevci.

The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Bikovo
The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Bikovo

The 19th century brought on a period of nationalism, including Magyarization and the Croatian romantic nationalism. Some Bunjevci developed a Croat national identity in the 20th century. Magyarization seems to have more effective than Croatization since the census of 1910 recorded many citizens of Hungarian mother tongue in parts of Bačka-Bodrog inhabited by the Bunjevci. It is estimated that a few tens of thousands of Bunjevci were Magyarized. However, Croatian identity remained strong among segments of the clergy, notable, the bishop of Subotica Ivan Antunović (18151888) supported the notion of calling Bunjevci and Šokci with the name Croats. Image File history File linksMetadata Bikovo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bikovo. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Bikovo Bikovo (Биково) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Magyarization or Magyarisation is the common name given to a number of forced assimilation policies applied by the Hungarian authorities at different times in history. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Croatisation (Croatization or Croatian: Hrvatizacija) is a term used to describe a cultural change in which somebody ethnically non-Croat is made to become Croat. ... Bács-Bodrog (Hungarian, in Serbian: Bačka-Bodrog) is the name of a historic administrative county (comitatus) of the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Ivan Antunović (June 19, 1815 – January 13, 1888) was the bishop of Kalocsa in Hungary, Croatian writer and one of the most prominent people among the Bunjevci and Å okci of his time. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of...


1880 saw the founding of the Bunjevačka stranka ("the Bunjevac party"), an indigenous political party. During this time, opinions varied on whether the Bunjevci should try to assert themselves as an independent ethnic group, or side with either the Serbs or the Croats. 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In October 1918, Bunjevci held a national convention in Subotica and decided to secede Vojvodina from Hungary and join Serbia. This was confirmed at the Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs in Novi Sad, which proclaimed unification with the Kingdom of Serbia in November of 1918. In 1918 the Bunjevci identified themselves as being the distinctive people. There were also other opinions, for example, on 10 November 1918 at the Great Bunjevci-Serbian national council Blaško Rajić declared that Serbs and Bunjevci are one nation. The subsequent creation of the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Yugoslavia in 1929) brought most of the Bačka Bunjevci in the same country with the Croats (with some remaining in Hungary). Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Republic  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica  - President Boris Tadić Establishment    - Formation 814   - First Serbian Uprising 1804   - Internationally recognized July 13, 1878   - Kingdom of SCS created December 1, 1918   - SCG dissolved... Nickname: Serbian Athens Motto: Град по мери грађана City of the citizens (in English) Location of Novi Sad within Serbia Coordinates: Country  Serbia Province Vojvodina District South Bačka Established 1694 City status February 1, 1748 Politics    - Mayor Maja Gojković (SRS)  - City assembly SRS, DSS and SPS  - Municipalities 2 (Novi Sad and Petrovaradin) Area... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...


During the late World War II, Partisan General Božidar Maslarić spoke on the national councils in Sombor and Subotica on 6 November 1944 and General Ivan Rukavina on Christmas in Tavankut in the name of the Communist Party about the Croatdom of the Bunjevci. After 1945, in Communist Yugoslavia the census of 1948 did not officially recognize the Bunjevci (nor Šokci), and instead merged their data with the Croats. The Communist Yugoslav regime and the Catholic Clergy decided to incorporate Bunjevci (and Šokci) into the Croatian national corpus. On 8 May 1945 Tito said: Uzimamo naprimjer Vojvodinu. Mi gradimo jedinstvo i bratstvo, ali srpski šovinisti u Vojvodini neće da priznaju Hrvatu da je Hrvat, već ga zovu Bunjevac ("We should see example in Vojvodina. We want to build brotherhood and unity, but the Serb shovinists in Vojvodina do not want to recognize that Croat is a Croat. Instead of this, they call him Bunjevac.").   Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian Macedonian Slovenian Government Federation of socialist republics Last President Stjepan Mesić Last Prime Minister Ante Marković Historical era Cold War  - Proclamation November 29 1943  - UN membership October 24, 1945  - Constitution 21 February 1974  - formation of FRY April 28 1992 Area  - July 1989 255,800... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Nevertheless, the Bunjevac schools in Vojvodina taught the Serbian version of the unified language (rather than the Croatian version). Proponents of a distinct Bunjevac ethnicity regard this time as another dark period of encroachment on their identity, while others feel that this naming assimilation did not help in the preservation of their language. The censuses of 1953 and 1961 also listed all declared Bunjevci as Croats. The 1971 population census listed the Bunjevci separately under the municipal census in Subotica upon the personal request of the organization of Bunjevci in Subotica. It listed 14,892 Bunjevci or 10.15% of the population of Subotica. Despite this, the Province and Federal authorities listed the Bunjevci as Croats, together with the Šokci and considered them that way officially at all occasions. In 1981 the Bunjevci made a similar request - it showed 8,895 Bunjevci, or 5.7% of the total population of Subotica.

Street detail in the Bunjevac village of Mala Bosna
Street detail in the Bunjevac village of Mala Bosna

Following the breakup of Yugoslavia in the 1990s, the renewed Bunjevac national movement was officially recognized as a minority group in Serbia in 1990. The community, however, has been divided around the issue of the name: in the 1991 census, in terms of ethnicity, around 21,434 inhabitants of Vojvodina declared themselves Bunjevci (17,527 in Subotica alone - or 11.7%) whereas some 74,808 declared themselves Croats; in 2002, there were 19,766 Bunjevci (16,254 in Subotica - or 10.95%) and around 56,546 Croats in Vojvodina. Note that not all of the Croats in Vojvodina necessarily have Bunjevac roots. Many Bunjevci also declared themselves as Yugoslavs. Image File history File linksMetadata Kisbosznia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kisbosznia. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Mala Bosna Mala Bosna (Мала Босна) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Yugoslav (Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic: Југословени, Latin: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...


In the Subotica region, there were 17,439 Bunjevci and 16,369 Croats in 1991. The historically Bunjevac village of Donji Tavankut had 989 Bunjevci, 877 Croats, and 600 Yugoslavs, the latter probably being a reaction to national ambiguity and pressures at the time. A 1996 survey by the local government in Subotica found that in the community, there are many people who declare as Croats and consider themselves Bunjevci, but also some people who declare as Bunjevci but consider themselves part of the wider Croatian nation. The same survey found that the delineation between the pro-Croat and pro-Bunjevac positions correlated with the delineation between the people who were more supportive towards the then ruling regime in Serbia that did not favor special rights for national minorities, and conversely those who were against the then government and more interested in minority rights and connections with their second homeland. Tavankut Donji Tavankut (Serbian: Donji Tavankut or Доњи Таванкут, also known simply as Tavankut or Таванкут) is a village located some 16 km west of Subotica, Serbia. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Today, both major parts of the community (the pro-independent Bunjevac one and the pro-Croatian one) continue to consider themselves ethnologically as Bunjevci, although each subscribing to its interpretation of the term. Ethnology (greek ethnos: (non-greek, barbarian) people) is a genre of anthropological study, involving the systematic comparison of the folklore, beliefs and practices of different societies. ...


In early 2005, the Bunjevac issue was again popularized when the Vojvodina government decided to allow the official use of "bunjevački language with elements of national culture" in schools in the following school year — the štokavian-ikavian dialect. This was protested by the Croatian Bunjevac community as an attempt of the government to widen the rift between the two Bunjevac communities. They favour integration, regardless of whether some people declared themselves distinct, because minority rights (such as the right to use a minority language) are applied based on the number of members of the minority. Subsequently, it may happen that schools would teach the same dialect but in two separate classes, one named bunjevački jezik, one hrvatski jezik, based solely on the preference of the parents. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has... A minority language is a language spoken by a minority of the population of a country. ...


In Hungary, Bunjevci are not officially recognized as a minority, government simply consider them Croats. In April 2006 a Bunjevci group began collecting subscriptions to register Bunjevci as a distinct minority group. The legal process was going on in August 2006. In Hungary, 1,000 valid subscriptions are needed to register an ethnic minority with historical presence. By the end of the given 60 days period the initiative gained over 2,000 subscriptions of which cca. 1,700 were declared valid by national vote office and Budapest parliament has a deadline of January 9th 2007 to solve the sitation by approving or refusing the proposal. No other such initiative has reached that level ever since minority bill passed in 1992. [2]


Bunjevac settlements

Ethnic map of the Subotica municipality showing the location of Bunjevac villages
Ethnic map of the Subotica municipality showing the location of Bunjevac villages

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (756x618, 67 KB)Ethnic map of Subotica municipality (self made) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (756x618, 67 KB)Ethnic map of Subotica municipality (self made) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Serbia

The villages in Serbia with Bunjevac majority are:

All villages are located in the Subotica municipality. According to the 2002 census, Bunjevac population in all of these villages was divided about their ethnic identification, since part of the Bunjevac population declared themselves as Bunjevci, and another part as Croats. However, only in the village of Ljutovo, the number of Bunjevci who declared themselves as such is larger than the number of those who declared themselves as Croats. map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Ljutovo Ljutovo (Љутово) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Bikovo Bikovo (Биково) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Gornji Tavankut Gornji Tavankut (Горњи Таванкут) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Tavankut Donji Tavankut (Serbian: Donji Tavankut or Доњи Таванкут, also known simply as Tavankut or Таванкут) is a village located some 16 km west of Subotica, Serbia. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Đurđin Đurđin (Ђурђин) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Mala Bosna Mala Bosna (Мала Босна) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Stari Žednik Stari Žednik (Стари Жедник) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ...


Bunjevci also live in other settlements in northern and western Bačka, in which they do not form the majority of population. These settlements are mostly concentrated in the municipalities of Subotica and Sombor. The largest concentration of Bunjevci in Serbia (10,870) is in the ethnically mixed city of Subotica, which is their cultural and political centre. Other settlements with large Bunjevac concentration include Sombor (2,222) and Bajmok (1,266). Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Location in Serbia-Montenegro [[Image:|150px|center|Map of Serbia-Montenegro highlighting the City of {{{common_name}}}]] General Information Mayor Dr. Jovan Slavković Land area  ? Population (2002 census) 50,950 (96,669 municipality) Population density (2002)  ? Coordinates [1] Area code +381 25 Subdivisions 16 settlements in the municipality License plate code... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Location in Serbia-Montenegro [[Image:|150px|center|Map of Serbia-Montenegro highlighting the City of {{{common_name}}}]] General Information Mayor Dr. Jovan Slavković Land area  ? Population (2002 census) 50,950 (96,669 municipality) Population density (2002)  ? Coordinates [1] Area code +381 25 Subdivisions 16 settlements in the municipality License plate code... The Catholic church, and bell-tower of the Orthodox church in Bajmok map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Bajmok Bajmok (Бајмок) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ...


Hungary

Towns and villages in Hungary with a significant Bunjevac population are:

  • Baja (263 from 37,916)
  • Gara (201 from 2,683)
  • Kaćmar/Katymár (136 from 2,359)

Villages partially populated by Bunjevci in the past (today fewer than 70 people): Baja (pronounced in Hungarian as ) is a city in southern Hungary. ... Gara (We are in Basque) is a bilingual (Basque/Spanish) Spanish newspaper published in the city of Donostia (San Sebastián in Spanish) in the Basque Country. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in Hungary Katymár is a village in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of southern Hungary. ...

  • Čavolj/Csávoly
  • Gornji Sentivan/Felsőszentiván
  • Aljmaš/Bácsalmás
  • Čikerija/Csikéria
  • Bikić/Bácsbokod
  • Matević/Mátételke
  • Baškut/Vaskút

Csávoly (Bunjevac, Croatian, and Serbian: Čavolj / Чавољ) is a village in Bács-Kiskun county, Hungary. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in the Southern Great Plain region Felsőszentiván is a village and municipality in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of southern Hungary. ... Bácsalmás (Croatian, Serbian, and Bunjevac: Aljmaš / Аљмаш, German: Almasch) is a small town in southern Hungary in the region of Bácska (Bács-Kiskun County), with a population of 7,694 people. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in Hungary Csikéria is a village in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of Hungary. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in Hungary Bácsbokod is a large village and municipality in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of southern Hungary. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in Hungary Mátételke is a village in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of southern Hungary. ... Location of Bács-Kiskun county in the Southern Great Plain region Vaskút is a large village and municipality in Bács-Kiskun county, in the Southern Great Plain region of southern Hungary. ...

Culture

Traditionally, Bunjevci are associated with land and farming. Large, usually isolated farms in Northern Bačka are called salaši, and historically most of Bunjevci people are associated with them. Most of their customs celebrate the land, and their most important feasts (other than Christmas and weddings) are:

  • Dužijanca — celebration of harvest end, and the most famous festival as well as a tourist attraction. It consists of several events held in Bunjevci-populated places (Bajmok, Tavankut), with the central celebration held in Subotica. Dužijanca includes religious celebrations devoted to harvest, street procession and performing of Bunjevci folklore and music.
  • Krsno ime — a celebration of a patron saint of the family. Because this custom is specific to the Serbs, who call it slava, it is assumed that Bunjevci who practice it were once Orthodox Serbs who converted to Catholicism.
  • Kraljice — ceremonial processions held on Pentecost.
  • Divan — a meeting of young boys and girls for singing and dancing in a place afar from their parents. The custom has been forbidden by church authorities already in mid-19th century.

Bunjevačke novine (Bunjevac newspaper) are the main newspaper in Bunjevac language/dialect, published in Subotica. The Catholic church, and bell-tower of the Orthodox church in Bajmok map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Bajmok Bajmok (Бајмок) is a village located in the Subotica municipality, in the North Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... map of Subotica municipality, showing the location of Donji Tavankut Donji Tavankut (Serbian: Donji Tavankut or Доњи Таванкут, also known simply as Tavankut or Таванкут, Croatian: Donji Tavankut, Hungarian: Alsó-Tavankút) is a village located some 16 km west of Subotica, Serbia. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Former the 60s progressive rock band, Procession, see Procession, Sixties band Funeral Procession, illustrated in a manuscript of the Hours of the Virgin. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Slava (Cyrillic: Слава) is the Orthodox Christian custom of celebrating a family patron saint. ... Pentecost (symbolically related to the Jewish festival of Shavuot) is a feast on the Christian liturgical calendar that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, and the followers (men and women) of Jesus, fifty days (seven weeks) after Easter, and ten days after Ascension Thursday. ... Bunjevačke novine (lit. ... Subotica city hall Subotica (Serbian: Суботица or Subotica, Hungarian: Szabadka, Croatian: Subotica, German: Maria-Theresiopel or Theresiopel, Slovak: Subotica, Rusin: Суботица, Romanian: Subotica or Subotita) is a city and municipality in northern Serbia and Montenegro, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ...


Distinguished Bunjevci

Musician Zvonko Bogdan is the best known Bunjevac, and his songs (composed or traditional) have popularized Bunjevac culture and tradition across Serbia and the rest of former Yugoslavia. Zvonko Bogdan (born January 5, 1942 in Sombor, Serbia) is a singer of traditional folk songs from Vojvodina, especially Bačka. ...


Blaško Rajić was a Serbian patriot in the late 19th century; leader of the movement to unite Serbia in the early 20th century and president of the Great Serbo-Bunjevci assembly and vice-president of the Great National Assembly of Serbs, Bunjevci and other Slavs of Vojvodina in 1918.


Footballer Goran Bunjevčević is possibly the best known Bunjevac internationally, and has represented Serbia and Montenegro. He currently plays for the English Premiership club Tottenham Hotspur. Goran Bunjevčević (born February 17, 1973 in Karlovac) is a professional football (soccer) player who plays as a defender. ... The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system (above The Football League), making it Englands primary football competition. ... Tottenham Hotspur F.C. is a North London association football team, also known by the nickname Spurs. ...


Other known Bunjevci have included ban Josip Jelačić, Antun Gustav Matoš, Josip Pančić, Ivan Sarić, etc. Baron Josip Jelačić of Bužim (born 1801 in Petrovaradin, Habsburg Monarchy, Hungary; died 1859 in Zagreb, Habsburg Monarchy, Croatia and Slavonia; also spelled Jellachich or Jellačić) was the Ban of Croatia between March 23, 1848 and May 19, 1859. ... Antun Gustav MatoÅ¡ (June 13th, 1873 - March 17th, 1914) is Croatian writer best known as the representative of modernism in Croatian literature. ... Josif Pančić (Јосиф Панчић) (1814-1888) was a world-renown Serbian botanist. ... Monument of Ivan Sarić in Subotica Ivan Sarić (27 June 1876 – 23 August 1966), ethnic Bunjevac aviation pioneer and cyclist. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Szabadka varos története, II. Rész. 1892. of Iványi István
  2. ^ http://forum.index.hu/Article/showArticle?na_start=0&na_step=30&t=9130749&na_order=

External links

  • Bunjevci
  • Why Bunjevci did not Become a Nation - A Case Study (in PDF)
  • Bunjevci Region House in a museum in Bács-Kiskun county
  • Dužijanca (in Croatian)
  • About the Croatian Bunjevci
  • Bunjevci granted status of autochthonous people in Serbia (1996)
  • "Miroljub", a Bunjevci society from Sombor, written in the Bunjevac ikavian dialect

  Results from FactBites:
 
Article about "Bunjevci" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (645 words)
Bunjevci (singular Bunjevac, pronounced Bunye'vtzi and Bunye'vatz resp.) are a South Slav ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka/Bácska (today northern Serbia or Vojvodina) and southern Hungary, particularly in the Baja region.
Bunjevci migrated from the Dalmation hinterland, although some were brought to Bačka by the Turks to become peasants, while oothers came to escapte Turkish tyranny to lands under Austrian rule.
Bunjevci Region House in a museum in Bács-Kiskun county
The Croatian Bunjevci (3680 words)
BUNJEVCI are a Croatian sub-group, which one part colonized Lika and the Croatian Littoral, while the other part moved for the most part into Backa.
From that point on, there are more references to the Bunjevci in Backa, who in many waves moved from northern Dalmatia, Lika, and the Croatian littoral, and some from Bosnia, but their arrival is documented at the end of the 18th century.
The biggest manefestation of the unity between the Bunjevci and their Croat brothers was the majestic celebration in Subotica on August 14-16, 1936, as a rememberance of the 250 anniversary of the settling of one group of Bunjevci.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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