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Encyclopedia > Bullitt
Bullitt

Bullitt movie poster
Directed by Peter Yates
Produced by Philip D'Antoni
Robert E. Relyea
Written by Novel:
Robert L. Fish
Screenplay:
Alan Trustman
Harry Kleiner
Starring Steve McQueen
Robert Vaughn
Jacqueline Bisset
Music by Lalo Schifrin
Cinematography William A. Fraker
Editing by Frank P. Keller
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) Flag of United States October 17, 1968
Running time 113 min
Country Flag of United States United States
Language English
Budget $5,500,000
IMDb profile

Bullitt is a 1968 action crime mystery thriller film starring Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn and Jacqueline Bisset, with Don Gordon, Robert Duvall, Carl Reindel, Felice Orlandi, Vic Tayback, Pat Renella, Paul Genge, Bill Hickman, Norman Fell and Brandy Carroll. It was distributed by Warner Bros. DVD cover or insert scan from the movie Bullitt, personal scan, claiming fair use (does not detract from original work, scanned from legal copy, image is of sufficiently low resolution). ... Peter Yates (born 24 July 1929 in Aldershot, Hampshire) is an English film director and producer. ... Philip D’Antoni Born: February 19, 1929 in New York, NY Academy Award Winner (1971) Best Picture of the Year for The French Connection Golden Globe Winner (1972), Best Motion Picture Drama, for The French Connection Producer: The French Connection (1971) and Bullit (1968) Director/Producer: The Seven-Ups (1973... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Robert Francis Vaughn (born November 22, 1932) is an American actor noted for stage, film and television work, and best known as suave spy Napoleon Solo in the popular 1960s TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., although he continues to be a popular television actor into... Bisset as Gail Berke in The Deep, 1977. ... Lalo Schifrin Lalo Schifrin (born on June 21, 1932) is an Argentine Jewish pianist and composer, most famous for composing the burning-fuse theme tune from the Mission:Impossible television series. ... William A. Fraker (born on September 29, 1923 in Los Angeles, California), is a cinematographer, film director, and producer. ... Warner Bros. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // October 30 - The film The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn, debuts. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... // October 30 - The film The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn, debuts. ... Action films, or movies, are a film genre, where action sequences, such as fighting, stunts, car chases or explosions, take precedence over elements like characterisation or complex plotting. ... Mystery film is a film genre which uses mystery as an element to the plot. ... Thriller films are movies that primarily use action and suspense to engage the audience. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Robert Francis Vaughn (born November 22, 1932) is an American actor noted for stage, film and television work, and best known as suave spy Napoleon Solo in the popular 1960s TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., although he continues to be a popular television actor into... Bisset as Gail Berke in The Deep, 1977. ... Don Gordon, (born November 13, 1926 in Los Angeles, California) is an American film and television actor. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor and director. ... Categories: Stub | American actors | Television actors | Cinema actors | 1930 births | 1990 deaths ... Pat Renella (born 1933) is an American actor. ... William “Bill” Hickman, 25th January 1921 – 24th February 1986. ... Fell in the opening credits of Threes Company Norman Fell (born Norman Feld March 24, 1924 – December 14, 1998) was an American film and television actor most famous for his role as landlord Mr. ... Warner Bros. ...


The director was Peter Yates. The story was adapted for the screen by Alan Trustman and Harry Kleiner, based on the novel titled Mute Witness (1963) by Robert L. Fish (aka Robert L. Pike). Lalo Schifrin wrote the original music score, a memorable mix of jazz, brass and percussion. The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Peter Yates (born 24 July 1929 in Aldershot, Hampshire) is an English film director and producer. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Lalo Schifrin Lalo Schifrin (born on June 21, 1932) is an Argentine Jewish pianist and composer, most famous for composing the burning-fuse theme tune from the Mission:Impossible television series. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organized and audible sounds and silence. ... A film score is the music in a film, generally written for the film and often used to heighten emotions provoked by the imagery on the screen or by the dialogue. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... Image of a trumpet. ... A percussion instrument can be any object which produces a sound by being struck with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. ...


The movie won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing (Frank P. Keller) and was nominated for Best Sound. Writers Trustman and Kleiner won a 1969 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Motion Picture Screenplay. The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... The Mystery Writers of America are an organization for mystery writers. ...


Bullitt is most-remembered for its central car chase scene through the streets of downtown San Francisco, one of the earliest and most influential car chase sequences in movies. The scene had Bullitt in a dark "Highland Green" 1968 Ford Mustang G.T.390 Fastback, chasing two hit-men in a "Tuxedo Black" 1968 Dodge Charger R/T 440 Magnum. (In honor of the Mustang in the film, the Ford Motor Company produced a limited edition 2001 Ford Mustang GT "Bullitt Mustang," which took styling cues from the '68 movie car and even mimicked its exhaust note). Car chase often describes the pursuit of a criminal by police, and is increasingly captured on film from media and police helicopters. ... Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City 122 km²  (47 sq mi)  - Land 121. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Ford Mustang is an automobile produced by the Ford Motor Company, originally based on the Ford Falcon compact. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man), also referred to as a contract killer, is a hired assassin, usually in the employ of organized crime. ... There have been a number of vehicles bearing the Charger nameplate, but the name has generally denoted a performance model in the Dodge range. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Ford Motor Company and Ford (vehicles). ... The Ford Mustang is an automobile produced by the Ford Motor Company, originally based on the Ford Falcon compact. ...


The movie is also considered highly influential in many other ways within its genre. The use of a rebellious and borderline-insubordinate police officer as a protagonist operating despite interference from higher-ups was followed in many later movies, notably Dirty Harry and The French Connection, both released in 1971 . The idea of making the officer young and cool, and equipped with a sports car, was subsequently used by Starsky and Hutch and Miami Vice. Dirty Harry is a 1971 film directed by Don Siegel, the first of the series. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood film directed by William Friedkin. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the film, see Starsky & Hutch (film). ... Miami Vice was a popular television series (five seasons on NBC from 1984-1989) starring Don Johnson (James Sonny Crockett) and Philip Michael Thomas (Ricardo Rico Tubbs) as two Miami police detectives working undercover. ...


The movie as a whole, including the car chase, makes extensive use of the San Francisco Bay Area. However, San Francisco's most famous landmark, the Golden Gate Bridge, was not a part of the chase scene because the city's film commission refused to allow the filmakers to close the bridge and film there. USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ...

Contents

Plot

An ambitious California politician, Senator Walter Chalmers (played by Vaughn), is holding a Senate subcommittee hearing in San Francisco on Organized Crime in America and has a key witness whom he hopes will further his political aspirations as he brings down a powerful Mafia syndicate. The witness scheduled to testify, Johnny Ross, worked with his brother, Chicago mobster Pete Ross (played by Tayback). The story takes place the weekend before the hearing, from Friday night (during the opening credits) to Sunday night. Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... The Sicilian Mafia (also referred to simply as the Mafia or Cosa Nostra), is a criminal secret society of men which first developed in the mid-19th century in Sicily. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


Ross stole $2,000,000 from his Mafia cronies and two attempts were made on his life before he left for San Francisco. Chalmers has the San Francisco Police Department place Johnny Ross (played by Orlandi) in protective custody for the weekend and requests that the detective unit headed by Lieutenant Frank Bullitt (played by McQueen) be assigned to guard him. The San Francisco Police Department or S.F.P.D., is responsible for policing in the City and County of San Francisco. ...


Bullitt and his men, Sergeant Delgetti (played by Gordon) and Detective Stanton (played by Reindel), give Ross around-the-clock protection at a cheap hotel near an overhead freeway during separate shifts. Before Ross enters the hotel, he makes several phone calls. Saturday night, while Stanton is guarding him, the desk clerk calls and says Chalmers and a friend are there and want to come to the room. Stanton calls Bullitt at home, and is told not to let them in; Bullitt surmises that Chalmers would not show up at one in the morning. In the meantime, Ross walks over to the door and unlocks it. A pair of hit-men, Mike (played by Genge) and Phil (played by Hickman), then burst into the room and Mike shoots Detective Stanton in the leg with a shotgun blast. He then turns and shoots Ross, hitting him in the chest and face.


Stanton and Ross are both rushed to the hospital. Bullitt wants to get to the bottom of the case and catch who shot them, as well as the Mafia boss who ordered the hit. Chalmers is angered and blames Bullitt, threatening to ruin his career if Ross dies. He is simply not interested in the injured policeman or the hit-men, only in the hearings that will launch his national political career, and wants to shut down Bullitt's investigation.


Stanton survives his wounds, and Ross comes out of surgery with a "fifty-fifty" chance at survival. The gunman, Mike, then appears at the hospital to finish Ross off, but is discovered and is chased by Bullitt through stairwells and the physical therapy rooms. After Mike escapes, Bullitt returns to discover Ross has died from his wounds. Bullitt suppresses news of the death, has the doctor misplace the chart and has the body placed in the morgue under a John Doe identity. Mortuary, a film directed by Tobe Hooper, see Mortuary (film). ... In the United States, the name John Doe is typically used as a placeholder name for a male party in a legal action or legal discussion whose true identity is unknown or is intended to be anonymous. ...

Scene of the legendary car chase in Bullitt.
Scene of the legendary car chase in Bullitt.

Chalmers increases the pressure on Bullitt Sunday morning by serving his boss, Captain Bennett (Simon Oakland), with a writ of habeas corpus to produce the witness as Bennett arrives at church with his family. Bullitt reconstructs Ross's movements with the cabbie (played by Robert Duvall) who brought him into the city, and investigates the phone calls made by Ross. He finds that one was to a hotel in San Mateo; to a woman registered under the name Dorothy Simmons. With the hearing the next day, Bullitt suspects that this dead mobster may not be who he seems. The scene is set for the legendary and exciting high-speed car chase through San Francisco. Image File history File links Bullitt. ... Simon Oakland (28 August 1915 - 29 August 1983) began his career as a violinist (a vocation he would enjoy his entire career as an actor), and began acting in the late 1940s. ... In common law jurisdictions, habeas corpus, or more precisely habeas corpus ad subjiciendum, is a prerogative writ which requires the addressee to produce in court a person in its custody and justify his or her imprisonment. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor and director. ... Hillsdale Inn, Honeymoon Suite (demolished 5 April 2001) San Mateo is a city in San Mateo County, California, USA. It is one of the larger suburbs on the San Francisco Peninsula, located between Burlingame to the north, Foster City to the East, and Belmont to the south. ...


The hit-men try to follow Bullitt to set him up for an ambush, but he evades them, backtracks, and comes up behind their car, surprising them. Bullitt gives chase through the hilly streets of San Francisco and the outlying highways. The chase comes to an end after Mike shoots at Bullitt's car with a 12-gauge shotgun and Phil loses control of the car. They careen from the highway and crash into a gas station. Both are killed in the fiery explosion. An ambush is a long established military tactic in which an ambushing force uses concealment to attack an enemy that passes its position. ... It has been suggested that Break action be merged into this article or section. ...


Back at the police station, Bullitt begins to check out Dorothy Simmons, the woman Johnny Ross called in San Mateo. He needs a car, but one is not available at the station. His architect girlfriend, Cathy (played by Bisset), drives him to the suburban motel, where he discovers the woman has been murdered via strangulation. Cathy gets out of the car and wanders into the crime scene, where she sees the murder victim. She is upset as they leave. The two pull over to the side of a busy freeway and talk about Frank's cool attitude about the homicide investigation. She has trouble accepting his job, and the true nature of police work. "You're living in a sewer, Frank!" she says.


Bullitt and Delgetti check the luggage of the victim, which has arrived at the police evidence office. They learn that her true identity was Dorothy Renick (played by Carroll), and that she was scheduled on a flight from San Francisco International Airport to Rome, Italy, with her husband, Albert E. Renick. They also find a lot of money. FAA diagram of SFO SFO redirects here. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban...


Bullitt then tells Delgetti to call immigration in Chicago and have them send Ross's passport application while he requests a fingerprint check. When he gets a copy of the passport photo, Bullitt realizes Chalmers has been conned. The man who was murdered was not Johnny Ross but was actually Dorothy's husband, Albert Renick, a used car salesman from Chicago with no Mafia connections. The real Johnny Ross must have paid Renick to impersonate him, while letting Ross use his passport and identity to leave the country. Ross must have also set Renick up to get the heat off him, then killed his wife to shut her up.


Bullitt has to stop Ross before he can make his getaway on the flight to Rome as Albert Renick. He arrives at the airport just as the plane is about to take off and phones the plane and the pilot returns to the terminal. Bullitt enters the plane as the passengers are coming off and sees the real Johnny Ross (played by Renella). Ross jumps from the back door of the plane. Bullitt pursues Ross on foot across the runways as airliners take off around them, with Ross shooting at Bullitt and other police officers who join the foot pursuit. Inside the terminal, Bullitt finally corners Ross at a glass doorway and fires two shots from his gun, only the second time he uses it in the movie. With Ross dead, the case is finally closed.


The movie ends with Bullitt returning home to find Cathy asleep. He enters the bathroom to wash his hands and looks into the mirror, quietly contemplating his future as a detective.


Trivia

  • To appease the then vociferous Italian-American lobby there are no references to the Mafia, only to The Organization, and Johnny Rossi from the novel Mute Witness had his name truncated. The mafiosi are given non-Italian names, although Ross is clearly intended to look Italian and is fleeing to Rome.
  • Steve McQueen based his character in the movie on SFPD homicide detective Dave Toschi, who gained a modicum of fame for his work on the Zodiac killer case. (McQueen's preparation for the role included having a copy made of Toschi's custom fast-draw shoulder holster.)
  • The Jargon Dictionary references this movie in regard to crash and burn. [1]
  • The famous chase sequence from Bullitt has been voted the best car chase in film history [2][3][4], in front of The French Connection (1971) and the original Gone in 60 Seconds (1974). {Allegedly a parody of the chase scene is in Clint Eastwood film The Dead Pool}.
McQueen burning rubber in Bullitt.
McQueen burning rubber in Bullitt.
  • Two 1968 Mustangs and two 1968 Dodge Chargers were used for the chase scene. Both Mustangs were owned by Ford Motor Company and were part of a promotional loan agreement with Warner Bros. The Mustangs engines, brakes and suspensions were highly modified for the chase by veteran car racer Max Balchowsky. The Dodge Chargers were bought outright from Glendale Dodge in Glendale, California. The engines in both Chargers were left largely unmodified, but the suspensions were upgraded to cope with the demands of the stunt work.
  • Though it is widely believed that Steve McQueen, who was a great race car driver, did the bulk of the driving stunt work, the stunt coordinator, Carey Loftin, had famed stuntman and motorcycle racer Bud Ekins do most of the risky stunts in the Mustang (Ekins also doubled for McQueen in one sequence of The Great Escape, in which McQueen's character jumps over a barbed wire fence on a motorcycle).
  • The Mustang's interior rearview mirror goes up and down depending on who is driving. When the mirror is up, visible, McQueen is behind the wheel, and when it is down, not visible, Ekin is in the car.
  • The director called for speeds of about 75 to 80 mph (120 to 130 km/h), but the cars (including the ones containing the cameras) reached speeds of over 110 mph (175 km/h) on surface streets.
  • Filming of the chase scene took three weeks, resulting in 9 minutes and 42 seconds of film.
  • During the chase scene, Lt. Frank Bullitt upshifts 16 times without downshifting. A manual transmission in a 1968 Ford Mustang only has four forward gears.
  • During the chase scene, the Charger loses six hubcaps and has different ones missing at different times.
  • The production company was denied permission to film on the Golden Gate Bridge.
  • This is the second of three films in which both Steve McQueen (Lt. Frank Bullitt) and Robert Vaughn (Walter Chalmers) appear. The other two are The Magnificent Seven and The Towering Inferno.
  • This is the first of three films in which both Steve McQueen and Don Gordon (Delgetti) appear. The other two are Papillon and The Towering Inferno.
  • The use of a fax machine at the time the film is set (1968) may seem an anachronism to modern viewers, but fax machines have been used to transmit photographs since 1924.
  • Scenes from the film were used in a 1997 commercial for the Ford Puma with CGI used to have McQueen drive the car through the streets of San Francisco instead of the Mustang. At the end of the ad, McQueen parks the car in his garage, glances at the Triumph motorcycle he used from The Great Escape and gives the car a loving tap as he walks away.
  • A model of the Vaillancourt Fountain can be seen on Cathy's desk.
  • In the 2003 movie S.W.A.T., a Bullitt poster can be seen in Jim Street's (Colin Farrell) apartment
  • Steve McQueen is the "absolute man" according to an Absolut Vodka television adverstisement. The clip shown is a scene from Bullitt.
  • At a 1996 Fanclub conference in Belize, Mark Patrick was proclaimed the worlds #1 Bullitt Fan.

Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... The cross-like symbol used by the Zodiac Killer. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood film directed by William Friedkin. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... The Dead Pool (1988) is the fifth and latest film in the Dirty Harry series. ... Image File history File links Burninrubber4. ... Image File history File links Burninrubber4. ... Nickname: The Jewel City Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ... Nickname: The Jewel City Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ... Carey Loftin (b: January 31, 1914 Blountstown, Florida d: March 4, 1997 Huntington Beach, California) was an American actor and stuntman whose most famous role, though he wasnt visible, was as the truck driver in Steven Spielbergs Duel. ... A stunt double is a type of body double, specifically a skilled replacement used for dangerous film or video sequences, in movies and television (such as jumping out of a building, jumping from vehicle to vehicle, or other similar actions), and for other sophisticated stunts (especially fight scenes). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Robert Francis Vaughn (born November 22, 1932) is an American actor noted for stage, film and television work, and best known as suave spy Napoleon Solo in the popular 1960s TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., although he continues to be a popular television actor into... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Towering Inferno is a 1974 disaster movie directed by John Guillermin adapted by Stirling Silliphant from the novels The Tower by Richard Martin Stern and The Glass Inferno by Thomas N. Scortia and Frank M. Robinson. ... Steve McQueen in The Great Escape Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool. He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Don Gordon, (born November 13, 1926 in Los Angeles, California) is an American film and television actor. ... Papillon is a French word for butterfly. The term may also refer to Papillon (autobiography), a memoir written by Henri Charrière about his imprisonment at a penal colony in French Guiana. ... The Towering Inferno is a 1974 disaster movie directed by John Guillermin adapted by Stirling Silliphant from the novels The Tower by Richard Martin Stern and The Glass Inferno by Thomas N. Scortia and Frank M. Robinson. ... A Samsung fax machine. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2001 Ford Puma 1. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... S.W.A.T. is a 2003 action crime movie and is a take on the old television series of the same name. ... Absolut Vodka is a Swedish brand of vodka, owned by V&S Group, and produced at their facilities near Åhus, Scania in southern Sweden. ...

Quotes

Edit - Copy icon This section is a candidate to be copied to Wikiquote using the Transwiki process.

If the content can be changed to be more encyclopedic rather than just a list of quotes, please do so and remove this message. Otherwise, you can help by formatting it per the Wikiquote guidelines in preparation for the duplication. Image File history File links Edit-copy. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • Pete Ross: (on phone) "This is Pete. We lost him."
    Phone voice: "He's your brother, Ross. If you can't find him, we have people who can. And you're paying for the contract."
  • Frank Bullitt: "You believe what you want. You work your side of the street and I'll work mine."
  • Walter Chalmers: "Come on, now. Don't be naive, Lieutenant. We both know how careers are made. Integrity is something you sell the public."
    Bullitt: "You sell whatever you want, but don't sell it here tonight."
  • Chalmers: "Frank, we must all compromise."
    Bullitt: "Bullshit. Get the hell out of here, now."
  • Captain Bennett: "He let the killers in himself? Why would he do a thing like that?"
    Bullitt: "I'm waiting to ask him."
    Bennett: "What about the setup? What do you make of that?"
    Bullitt: "Shotgun and a backup man, professionals."
  • Chalmers: "I do not choose to have people accuse me of false promises for the sake of cheap sensationalism, or to be compromised by your lieutenant."
  • Chalmers: "Who's Renick?"
    Bullitt: "He was the man who was shot at the Hotel Daniels. You sent us to guard the wrong man, Mr. Chalmers."

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bullitt Locations in San Francisco - April 1968, July 2002 (2654 words)
Bullitt makes a U-turn on Army at Precita (note the Pontiac and the lighting: here is the very next frame with a 1956 Dodge Coronet where the Pontiac was and different lighting), and here is Army and Precita in 2002 with the gas station still in operation but no longer a Phillips 66.
Chalmers confronts Frank Bullitt at the ambulance entrance of the Hall of Justice at Harriet Street and Ahern.
Bullitt knows that Renick made a long distance phone call from a pay phone near Union Square and has traced the number to a Dorothy Simmons (actually Judith Renick, wife of Albert Renick) at the Thunderbolt Motel in San Mateo.
USDOJ: OSG: William Marshall Bullitt, Solicitor General (483 words)
William Marshall Bullitt was born to parents Thomas Walker and Annie P. (Logan) Bullitt in Louisville, Kentucky, on March 4, 1873.
Bullitt was known to be a very slight man who one Kentuckian remarked could “talk faster than any man in Kentucky.” He argued more than fifty cases in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, some of which were argued while serving as Solicitor General of the United States.
Bullitt is buried at Oxmoor Cemetery in Kentucky.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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