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Encyclopedia > Bull Durham
Bull Durham

Theatrical poster
Directed by Ron Shelton
Produced by Thom Mount
Mark Burg
Written by Ron Shelton
Starring Kevin Costner
Susan Sarandon
Tim Robbins
Robert Wuhl
Trey Wilson
Jenny Robertson
Music by Michael Convertino
Editing by Robert Leighton
Adam Weiss
Distributed by Orion Pictures Corporation
Release date(s) June 15, 1988 (U.S. release)
Running time 108 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $9,000,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $50,888,729 (USA)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Bull Durham is a 1988 American movie about love and baseball. It is based upon the minor league experiences of writer/director Ron Shelton. Bull Durham stars Kevin Costner, Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins. It depicts the players and fans of the Durham Bulls, a minor league baseball team in Durham, North Carolina. Also featured are Robert Wuhl and Max Patkin, the "Clown Prince of Baseball." Image File history File links Size of this preview: 333 × 500 pixelsFull resolution (333 × 500 pixel, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Bull Durham This image is of a film poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the film or... Ron Shelton (September 15, 1945 in Whittier, California) is a U.S. film director, most notable for making movies about sports. ... Thom Mount (born May 28, 1948) is the former President of Universal Pictures and one of Americas most well-known independent producers. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor and director who has often produced his own films. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... Robert Wuhl (born October 9, 1951) is a comedian turned actor/writer. ... Jenny Robertson (2 November 1963) is an American actress who has appeared in Rude Awakening and Reno 911!. She is married to actor Thomas Lennon. ... Orion Pictures Logo Orion Pictures Corporation was a United States movie production company, formed in 1978 as a joint venture between Warner Bros. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Minor League Baseball. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Ron Shelton (September 15, 1945 in Whittier, California) is a U.S. film director, most notable for making movies about sports. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor and director who has often produced his own films. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Minor League Baseball. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Country United States State North Carolina County Durham County Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Robert Wuhl (born October 9, 1951) is a comedian turned actor/writer. ... Max Patkin (January 10, 1920 - October 30, 1999) was an American baseball player and clown, best known as the Clown Prince of Baseball. ...


This film is number 55 on Bravo's "100 Funniest Movies". It is also ranked #97 on the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Laughs" list, and #1 on Rotten Tomatoes' Top Sports Movies list of the 53 best reviewed sports movies of all time. This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 100 funniest American films. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Summary

Costner stars as "Crash" Davis (named after -- but in no other way based after -- Lawrence "Crash" Davis, an actual player for the Durham Bulls in 1948), a veteran of countless years in the minor leagues unwillingly sent down to single-A Bulls for a specific purpose: to educate a hotshot rookie pitcher "Nuke" LaLoosh (Robbins, playing a character loosely based on Steve Dalkowski) about being a major-league talent, and to get Nuke to control his haphazard pitching. Crash immediately begins calling Nuke by the degrading name of "Meat", and they get off to a very rocky start. Lawrence Crash Davis (1919-August 31, 2001) was an American professional baseball player who inspired the title character of the 1988 movie Bull Durham. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Minor League Baseball. ... Steve Dalkowski. ...


Thrown into the mix is Annie (Sarandon, the character named for the "Baseball Annies" groupies), a life-long spiritual seeker who latched onto the "Church of Baseball" and has, every year, taken on a prospect with the Bulls to be a lover/student. Annie flirts with Crash and Nuke but Crash walks out, noting he's too much a veteran to 'try out' for anything, although before leaving he and Annie share some sparks of mutual interest. It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ...


Annie and Crash then work, in their own way, and with a lot of animosity from Crash, to shape Nuke into a big-league pitcher: Annie by playing mild bondage games, reading poetry to Nuke, and getting the rookie to think in alternative ways; Crash by forcing Nuke to learn "not to think," by letting the catcher make the pitching calls (memorably at two points telling the batters what pitch was coming after Nuke had shaken off Crash's calls), and lecturing to Nuke about the major leagues with both the pressure in facing big league hitters that can hit Nuke's "heat" (fastballs) and the pleasure of enjoying life in 'The Show' that Crash briefly lived for "the twenty-one best days of my life" and has tried desperately for years to get back to. Meanwhile, as Nuke matures the relationship between Annie and Crash grows, until it becomes obvious that the two of them are right for each other, except for the fact that Annie's currently with Nuke. Along the way, Annie asks Crash what he believes about life, and Crash delivers a spectacular harangue.


After a rough start to Nuke's career, he becomes a dominant pitcher by mid-season thanks to the coaching of Annie and Crash. By the end of the movie, Nuke is called up to 'The Show' and the Bulls, now having no use for Nuke's personal mentor, release Crash. This incites jealous anger in Crash, who is frustrated by Nuke's failure to recognize all the talent he was blessed with. Nuke leaves for the big leagues, effectively ending his relationship with Annie, and Crash overcomes his initial jealously to leave Nuke with some final words of advice.


Eventually Crash, an experienced and skilled hitter, joins another team, the Asheville Tourists, and breaks the minor league record for most career home runs, achieving a personal milestone that he has striven for. Annie wants to tell The Sporting News about it, but Crash swears her to silence. Crash then retires as a player and returns to Durham to begin a life with Annie. He tells her that he will accept a baseball coaching job. Foreshadowing suggests that he'll succeed both in this coaching role and in his life with Annie. Both characters end one phase of their lives and begin another. We see Nuke one last time, being interviewed as a major leaguer, where he recites some answers to questions which he practiced earlier in the movie with Crash. Colorado Rockies National League AAA Colorado Springs Sky Sox AA Tulsa Drillers A Modesto Nuts Asheville Tourists Tri-City Dust Devils R Casper Rockies The Asheville Tourists are a minor league baseball team in Asheville, North Carolina, USA. They are a Class A team in the South Atlantic League, and... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...


Cast and characters

Kevin Costner ... Crash Davis
Susan Sarandon ... Annie Savoy
Tim Robbins ... Ebby Calvin "Nuke" LaLoosh
Trey Wilson ... Joe Riggins
Robert Wuhl ... Larry Hockett
William O'Leary ... Jimmy
David Neidorf ... Bobby
Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor and director who has often produced his own films. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... Robert Wuhl (born October 9, 1951) is a comedian turned actor/writer. ... William OLeary is an American actor. ...


Production

Ron Shelton played minor league baseball for five years, starting off at second base for the Baltimore Orioles farm system after graduating from Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. He moved from the Appalachian League to California and then Texas before finally playing AAA ball for Rochester in the International League. Shelton quit when he realized that he would never become a major league player. “I was 25. In baseball, you feel 60 if you're not in the big leagues. I didn't want to become a Crash Davis,” he said in an interview.[1] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... , Westmont College is a Christian liberal arts college in Santa Barbara, California. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California Coordinates: , County Santa Barbara Government  - Mayor Marty Blum Area  - City 111. ...

Tim Robbins as "Nuke" LaLoosh and Kevin Costner as "Crash" Davis.
Tim Robbins as "Nuke" LaLoosh and Kevin Costner as "Crash" Davis.

He went back to school and earned in M.F.A. in sculpture at the University of Arizona before moving to Los Angeles to join the city’s art scene. However, he felt more kinship in telling stories than creating performance art. Bull Durham was the first screenplay he ever wrote with a first draft in 1979 that was originally entitled, The Player To Be Named Later. All that remains from this version is a single anecdote. Debra Winger turned down susan Sarandon's part in this film. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor and director who has often produced his own films. ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Debra Winger (born May 16, 1955) is an Academy Award- nominated American actress. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...


His break into filmmaking was second unit work on the films Under Fire and The Best of Times (both of which he also wrote). However, when he pitched Bull Durham, Shelton had a hard time convincing a studio to give him the opportunity to direct. Baseball movies were not considered a viable commercial prospect at the time and every studio passed except for Orion Pictures who gave him a $9 million budget (with many cast members accepting lower than usual salaries because of the material), an eight-week shooting schedule and creative freedom. Under Fire is a political film set in 1979, during last days of the Somoza dictatorship in Nicaragua. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Producer Thom Mount (who is part owner of the real Durham Bulls) hired Pete Bock, a former semi-pro baseball player who now runs his own baseball management company, as a consultant on the film. Bock recruited more than a dozen minor-league players, ran a tryout camp to recruit an additional 40 to 50 players from lesser ranks, hired several minor-league umpires and conducted two-a-day workouts and practice games with Tim Robbins pitching and Kevin Costner catching. Thom Mount (born May 28, 1948) is the former President of Universal Pictures and one of Americas most well-known independent producers. ...


Bock made sure the actors look and acted like ballplayers and that the real players acted convincingly in front of the cameras. He said, “the director would say, 'This is the shot we want. What we need is the left fielder throwing a one-hopper to the plate. Then we need a good collision at the plate.' I would select the players I know could do the job, and then we would go out and get it done.”[2]


According to the Internet Movie Database, filming was done after the close of the regular season, during September and October of 1987. The length of the shadows during the day games subtly give away the time of year. Durham Athletic Park was, of course, used for most of the baseball action. There were also scenes filmed in other Carolina League cities, although one establishing shot of War Memorial Stadium in Greensboro, North Carolina was erroneous, because Greensboro's club was and is in the South Atlantic League. The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Durham Athletic Park ca. ... The Carolina League is a minor league baseball affiliation which operates in the South Atlantic region of the United States. ... World War Memorial Stadium, more commonly known as War Memorial Stadium, is the name of a former minor league baseball park in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... Greensboro Skyline Greensboro redirects here. ... The South Atlantic League is a minor league baseball league which operates mostly in the southeastern United States, although it now has teams in New Jersey and Ohio. ...


The Durham Bull sign, once a staple at ballparks everywhere, was built specifically for the movie. Once filming was done, the bull was retained as a decoration, albeit in foul territory, and with a simple "Let's Go Bulls" instead of "Hit Sign Win Steak". Like the Hollywood Sign, this Durham Bull was not originally intended to be a long-lasting artifact, and was eventually replaced by a sturdier version. The new Durham Bulls Athletic Park also features the Durham Bull. In the new park, the sign is in fair territory, and hitting the bull will win the batter a free steak. Also, if the batter hits the grass the bull is standing on, he will win a free salad. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Durham Bulls Athletic Park is a baseball stadium in Durham, North Carolina that is home to the AAA affiliate of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays of Major League Baseball. ...


Aside from the sliding routine, the "rainout" scene was based on an actual event. In the late 1960s, Shelton played minor-league ball in the Texas League. Shelton's team was in Amarillo, Texas for a season-ending series. The night before the final game, Shelton, some teammates and some Amarillo players were out partying and decided to go to the stadium and turn on the sprinkler system, thereby flooding the field and ensuring a "rainout". However, the Amarillo team owner rented a helicopter, dried the field, and the game was played.


Reaction

In David Ansen’s review for Newsweek magazine, he wrote that the film “works equally as a love story, a baseball fable and a comedy, while ignoring the clichés of each genre.”[1] Vincent Canby praised Shelton’s direction in his review for the New York Times, “he demonstrates the sort of expert comic timing and control that allow him to get in and out of situations so quickly that they're over before one has time to question them. Part of the fun in watching Bull Durham is in the awareness that a clearly seen vision is being realized. This is one first-rate debut.”[3] Hal Hinson’s review in the Washington Post praised the film’s “easy command of the ballplayer's vernacular, in their feel for what goes through a batter's head when he digs in at the plate and in their knowledge of the secret ceremonies that take place on the mound.”[4] David Ansen is movie critic and senior editor for Newsweek, where he has been reviewing movies since 1977. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ...


Cultural impact

Bull Durham became a minor hit when released, and is now considered one of the best sports movies.[5] It became a major career moment for the lead cast members. Costner especially would later play baseball players and fans in other movies, especially Field of Dreams. After Durham came out Hollywood began releasing more sports, and especially baseball, movies after the genre had slipped from view. Baseball field from the movie. ...


Many quotes and scenes have become popular, including the scene where the team's manager berates the players as 'lollygaggers' in the shower, Crash's reciting to Annie a list of things he believes in (including a belief that Oswald was a lone gunman), the scene where Crash creates a "rain-out" so his teammates can have a day off a grueling road trip, and the pitching mound scene where the entire team gathers to discuss how to fix all the curses and bad luck they're having, as well as figuring out what to get a fellow teammate for his impending wedding. Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to two United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. ...


Most of all, it revived interest in minor league baseball, which had been stagnating in small-town areas for decades, to where minor league teams achieve decent attendance and are even subject to relocation/bidding wars between communities. The Durham Bulls team itself in real-life has become one of the most famous minor-league teams in the United States (topped only by the Birmingham Barons during the year Michael Jordan tried baseball), and has moved from A (Class A) level to Triple-A (players who are one call away from 'The Show') status, complete with a larger stadium built in the 1990s to accommodate the growing crowds and the shift to AAA as a minor league affiliate to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays (during the film's time period, the Bulls were with the Atlanta Braves). League Southern League Division South Division Year founded 1885 Major League affiliation Chicago White Sox Home ballpark Regions Park Previous home ballparks Rickwood Field City Hoover, Alabama Current uniform colors black, white, silver Previous uniform colors Logo design The wordmark Barons in black outlined in white and silver with the... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Durham Bulls Athletic Park is a baseball stadium in Durham, North Carolina that is home to the AAA affiliate of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays of Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1998–present) East Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 12, 42 Name Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-Rays, The Rays Ballpark Tropicana Field (1998–present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) none Division titles... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston...


References

  1. ^ a b Ansen, David. "A Major-League Romp", Newsweek, June 20, 1988. 
  2. ^ Van Gelder, Lawrence. "At the Movies", New York Times, June 10, 1988. 
  3. ^ Canby, Vincent. "Toons and Bushers Fly High", New York Times, July 3, 1988. 
  4. ^ Hinson, Hal. "Bull Durham", Washington Post, June 15, 1988. 
  5. ^ Ballew, Bill. "Bull Durham Adds Another Chapter to McCormick Field History", The Asheville Tourists. Retrieved on 2007-04-09. 

The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lawrence Crash Davis (1919-August 31, 2001) was an American professional baseball player who inspired the title character of the 1988 movie Bull Durham. ... Steve Dalkowski. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bull Durham (3205 words)
Bull Durham was charging down upon him and close at his heels were thirty-two sharp horned, wicked-hooved, guess we had you fooled and now we're gonna stomp you, cows with their heads lowered, tails raised, and a new mission in life.
Bull Durham was so angry that Louie had gotten away the he began to pummel the trees' trunk with his head and commenced stripping away the bark with his teeth.
Bull Durham and his thirty-two team assault force slowly tired of their sport and meandered off to find some isolated hollow in which to bed down for the night.
Durham, North Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2531 words)
Durham originated in 1853 with the search for a suitable railroad depot for the North Carolina Railroad between Wilson and Hillsborough.
Trinity College, established in Durham in 1892, would be transformed into Duke University in 1924 on the promise of a large endowment of money from James B. Duke should the name of the university be changed to "Duke University" to honor his father, Washington Duke.
Durham's growth began to rekindle during the 1970s and 1980s, with the construction of multiple housing developments in the southern part of the city, nearest Research Triangle Park, and the beginnings of downtown revitalization.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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