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Encyclopedia > Bulawayo
The City of Bulawayo is highlighted in this map of Zimbabwe.
The City of Bulawayo is highlighted in this map of Zimbabwe.
Bulawayo district
Bulawayo district

Bulawayo is the second largest city in Zimbabwe, after the capital Harare, with a population of 676,000 (UN Humanitarian Co-ordinator, Zimbabwe, 2005), now estimated on 707,000. It is located in Matabeleland, 439km south-west of Harare (20°10′S 28°34′E), and is the capital of Matabeleland North. Credit: Sascha Noyes, 2004 Info: Map of the Bulawayo Province in Zimbabwe; Created with the GIMP File links The following pages link to this file: Bulawayo Categories: GFDL images ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1056x816, 19 KB) Map of the Bulawayo district of Zimbabwe. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1056x816, 19 KB) Map of the Bulawayo district of Zimbabwe. ... Harare (pronounced , formerly Salisbury) is the capital city of Zimbabwe. ... Matabeleland is a region in the west and south-west of Zimbabwe, between the Limpopo and Zambezi rivers. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | Provinces of Zimbabwe ...

Contents

General information

Bulawayo Coat of Arms.
Bulawayo Coat of Arms.

The name "Bulawayo" comes from the Sindebele word Kwabulawayo meaning 'place of the persecuted one' or 'place of slaughter'. It is also known as the 'City of Kings', 'Skies' or 'Bluez' or 'Bullers'. The city is on the site of the kraal of Lobengula, king of the Ndebele, who founded the settlement in 1871, about 15km south-east of the present city centre, over the site formerly known as Gibixhegu. In 1881, the king moved the royal settlement further north, to an area roughly corresponding with Bulawayo's modern northern suburbs near modern day Northlea High School. During the 1893 Matabele War the advance of British troops led the king to burn his capital and flee north, and troops occupied the town. The American Scout, Frederick Russell Burnham, witnessed the burning of old Bulawayo and later encountered Lobengula while serving as lead scout for the Shangani Patrol. On 4 November 1894, Leander Starr Jameson declared Bulawayo a settlement under the rule of the British South Africa Company and Cecil John Rhodes ordered that the new settlement be built on the ruins of Lobengula's royal town, which is where the State House stands today. In 1897, the new town of Bulawayo acquired the status of municipality, and in 1943, Bulawayo became a city. Image File history File links Bulawayo_Coat_of_Arms. ... Image File history File links Bulawayo_Coat_of_Arms. ... Title page of one of the earliest Sindebele phrase books, published for the use of settlers in Matabeleland. This article relates to the Ndebele language spoken by the Ndebele or Matabele people of Zimbabwe. ... Kraal (also spelt craal or kraul) is an Afrikaans word for either an enclosure for horses, cattle and the like, or a native village surrounded by a palisade, mud wall, or other fencing, roughly circular in form. ... Lobengula (d. ... This article relates to the Ndebele people of Zimbabwe. ... Combatants United Kingdom, British South Africa Police Ndebele Commanders Cecil Rhodes, Leander Starr Jameson King Lobengula, Mjaan, chief induna Casualties fewer than 100 Over 10,000 British Artillery, ca 1900. ... Frederick Russell Burnham, DSO (1861-1947), an American scout and world travelling adventurer is best known for his service to the British Army in Colonial Africa and for teaching woodcraft (i. ... A panel from the Shangani Memorial at Worlds View in Zimbabwe, c1905. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... An 1895 cartoon of Jameson from Vanity Fair Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, KCMG (February 9, 1853 – November 26, 1917), also known as Doctor Jim, was a British colonial statesman who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid. ... The flag of the British South Africa Company The British South Africa Company (BSAC) was established by Cecil Rhodes through the amalgamation of the Central Search Association and the Exploring Company, Ltd. ... Cecil Rhodes. ...


Siege of Bulawayo

Right at the outbreak of the the Second Matabele War, in March 1896, Bulawayo was besieged by Ndebele forces and a laager was established there for defensive purposes. The Ndebele had experienced the brutal effectiveness of the British Maxim guns in the First Matabele War, so they never mounted a significant attack against Bulawayo even though over 10,000 Ndebele warriors could be seen near the town. But rather than wait passively the settlers immediately mounted patrols, called the Bulawayo Field Force, under legendary figures such as Selous and Burnham who rode out to rescue any surviving settlers in the countryside and went on attack against the Ndebele. Within the first week of fighting, 20 men of the Bulawayo Field Force were killed and another 50 wounded. Burnham & Armstrong after the assassination of Mlimo. ... A laager is a defensive formation of vehicles. ... An early Maxim gun in operation with the Royal Navy A 1895 . ... Selous may refer to: Frederick Selous, explorer Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania Selous Scouts, the special forces of the Rhodesian Army Selous, Zimbabwe Category: ...


During the siege, conditions inside Bulawayo quickly deteriorated. By day, settlers could go to homes and buildings within the town, but at night they were forced to seek shelter in the much smaller laager. Nearly 1,000 women and children were crowded into the small area and false alarms of attacks were common. The Ndebele made a critical error during the siege in neglected to cut the telegraph lines connecting Bulawayo to Mafeking. This gave both the besieged Bulawayo Field Force and the British relief forces, coming from Harare (formerly Salisbury) and Masvingo (formerly Fort Victoria) 300 miles to the North, and from Kimberley and Mafeking 600 miles to the South, far more information than they would otherwise have had. Once the relief forces arrived in late May 1896, the siege was broken and an estimated 50,000 Ndebele retreated into their stronghold of the Matobo Hills near Bulawayo. Not until October 1897 would the Ndebele finally lay down their arms. Mafikeng is the capital of the North West Province, South Africa, 870 miles NE of Cape Town and 492 miles SSW of Bulawayo by rail, and 162 miles in a direct line W by N of Johannesburg. ... Harare (pronounced , formerly Salisbury) is the capital city of Zimbabwe. ... Masvingo is the capital of the Masvingo Province of Zimbabwe. ... Kimberley is a town in South Africa, and the capital of the Northern Cape. ... Mafikeng is the capital of the North West Province, South Africa, 870 miles NE of Cape Town and 492 miles SSW of Bulawayo by rail, and 162 miles in a direct line W by N of Johannesburg. ... Matobo landscape. ...


Liberation

Statue of Cecil Rhodes, Bulawayo c1925.
Statue of Cecil Rhodes, Bulawayo c1925.

The liberation struggle for the independence of Zimbabwe was started in Bulawayo and today it is home to the strongest opposition to the government of Robert Mugabe. It is a welcoming multicultural city with residents able to speak at least three languages (English, Ndebele, Zulu, Xhosa, Kalanga, Suthu and SeSwati). Bulawayo has long been regarded as the business capital of Zimbabwe and is home to the National Railways of Zimbabwe because of its strategic position near Botswana and South Africa. It is the nearest large city to Hwange National Park, Matopo National Park and Victoria Falls. Image File history File links Bulawayo-rhodes-c1925. ... Image File history File links Bulawayo-rhodes-c1925. ... Cecil Rhodes. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born February 21, 1924) is a Zimbabwean politician. ... Hwange National Park is the largest game reserve in Zimbabwe. ... The Matopo National Park was once know as The Matopas. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains much of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability.


Bulawayo is home to the Queens Sports Club and Bulawayo Athletic Club, two of the three grounds in Zimbabwe where test match cricket has been played. It is home to two large football teams which are of two ethnic groups, Highlanders and Zimbabwe Saints. Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ...


Other facilities include:

The majority of the population of Bulawayo belong to the Ndebele ethnic and language group, who descend from 19th century Zulu immigrants and are a minority in Zimbabwe. The National University Of Science And Technology is a government sponsored university in Zimbabwe. ... Bulawayo Polytechnic College is an academic institution in Zimbabwe. ... Solusi University is a the largest private university in Zimbabwe. ... Christian Brothers College, Bulawayo is a private multiracial boys only high school located in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. ... Falcon College is a small private institution of higher learning for boys in the southern Matabeleland region of Zimbabwe. ... This article relates to the Ndebele people of Zimbabwe. ... The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are an African ethnic group of about 11 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ...


Town twinning

Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Aberdeen, often called The Granite City, is Scotlands third largest city, with a population of approximately 202,370[1]. Aberdeen is the chief commercial centre and seaport in the north-east of Scotland. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I...

See also

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
EB1911:Bulawayo

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Zimbabwe is divided into 8 provinces and 2 cities with provincial status: Bulawayo (city) Harare (city) Manicaland Mashonaland Central Mashonaland East Mashonaland West Masvingo Matabeleland North Matabeleland South Midlands Categories: | ... Districts of Zimbabwe The Provinces of Zimbabwe are divided into 59 districts and 1,200 municipalities. ...

References

  • Bridger, P., House, M., and others, 1973. Encyclopaedia Rhodesia, College Press, Salisbury, Rhodesia.
  • Scouting on Two Continents, by Major Frederick Russell Burnham, D.S.O. LC call number: DT775 .B8 1926. (1926)

Frederick Russell Burnham, DSO (1861-1947), an American scout and world travelling adventurer is best known for his service to the British Army in Colonial Africa and for teaching woodcraft (i. ...

External links

  • A map of Bulawayo
  • List of colonial settlers and traders in Bulawayo, 1895
  • More on contemporary Bulawayo
  • Bulawayo:detailed history and pictures of its modern state



 
Zimbabwe
Flag of Zimbabwe
Provinces
Manicaland | Mashonaland Central | Mashonaland East | Mashonaland West | Masvingo | Matabeleland North | Matabeleland South | Midlands
Cities
Bulawayo | Harare

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bulawayo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (372 words)
Bulawayo is the second largest city in Zimbabwe, after the capital Harare, with a population of 676,000 (UN Humanitarian Co-ordinator, Zimbabwe, 2005), now estimated on 707,000.
The majority of the population of Bulawayo belong to the Ndebele ethnic and language group, who descend from 19th century Zulu immigrants and are a minority in Zimbabwe.
A resident or native of Bulawayo is known as a Bulawegian.
Bulawayo - definition of Bulawayo in Encyclopedia (243 words)
Bulawayo is a major industrial centre with tree-lined streets and parks, courtesy of Cecil Rhodes, theatres, Victorian houses and several colleges.
Bulawayo is home to Zimbabwe's largest museum, the Mzilikmzi Arts and Crafts Centre, the Chipangali Wildlife Orphanage and Research Centre and the Kame Ruins.
Bulawayo is also home to the Queens Sports Club and Bulawayo Athletic Club, two of the three grounds in Zimbabwe where test match cricket has been played.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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