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Encyclopedia > Bukharian Jews
Bukharian Jews
Total population

approx. 160,000 [1]

Regions with significant populations
 Israel 100,000
 United States 50,000
 Uzbekistan 2,000
 Tajikistan 1,000
Languages
Traditionally Bukhari, Russian and Hebrew spoken in addtion.
Religions
Judaism
Related ethnic groups
Other Jewish groups
(Mizrahi, Sephardi, Ashkenazi, etc.)
Kurds,Mountain Jews

Bukharian Jews (Bukhorian Jews, Bukhari Jews, Bukharian Jews ) is a blanket term for Jews from Central Asia who speak Bukhori, a dialect of the Persian language. Their name comes from the Uzbek city of Bukhara, which once had a large Jewish community. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the vast majority have emigrated to Israel or the United States. Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uzbekistan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tajikistan. ... “Bukharan” redirects here. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Languages Hebrew, Dzhidi, Judæo-Arabic, Gruzinic, Bukhori, Judeo-Berber, Juhuri and Judæo-Aramaic Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions and Arabs. ... Languages Hebrew, Ladino, Judæo-Portuguese, Catalanic, Shuadit, local languages Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions, Spaniards, Portuguese Sephardi Jews (Hebrew: ספרדי, Standard Tiberian ; plural ספרדים, Standard Tiberian ) are a subgroup of Jews originating in the Iberian Peninsula, usually defined in contrast to Ashkenazi Jews... Languages Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, English Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Sephardi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, and other Jewish ethnic divisions Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (Standard Hebrew: sing. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Mountain Jews, or Juhuro, are Jews of the eastern Caucasus, mainly of Azerbaijan and Dagestan. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Bukhori, also known as Bukharic or Bukharan, is an Indo-Iranian language. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Bukhara (Tajik: Бухоро; Persian: , Buxârâ; Uzbek: ; Russian: ), from the Soghdian βuxārak (lucky place), is the fifth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and capital of the Bukhara Province (viloyat). ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ...

Contents

Background

Bukharan Jews, circa 1890.

The Bukharian Jews trace their ancestry to Israelites who never came back from the Babylonian captivity after exile in the 7th century BCE. In Central Asia, they survived for centuries subject to many conquering influences. The community was essentially cut off from the rest of the Jewish world for more than 2,000 years and managed to survive in the face of countless odds. They are considered one of the oldest ethno-religious groups of Central Asia and over the years they have developed their own distinct culture. The Bukharian Jews claim descent from the Tribe of Issahchar and Nephtalli. Image File history File links Bukharan Jews, circa 1890. ... Image File history File links Bukharan Jews, circa 1890. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Babylonian captivity also refers to the permanence of the Avignon Papacy. ... (8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC - other centuries) (700s BC - 690s BC - 680s BC - 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC - 640s BC - 630s BC - 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Scythians arrived in Asia Collapse... The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: Tefutzah, scattered, or Galut גלות, exile, Yiddish: tfutses) is the expulsion of the Jewish people out of the Roman province of Judea. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ...


Most Bukharian Jews lived in Emirate of Bukhara (currently Uzbekistan and Tajikistan), while a small number lived in Russia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan and some other parts of the former Soviet Union. In Emirate of Bukhara, the largest concentrations were in Samarkand, Bukhara, and Khokand. In Tajikistan, they similarly were mainly concentrated in the capital, Dushanbe. The Emirate of Bukhara (1747-1920) was a state in Central Asia, with its capital in Bukhara and was a Russian protectorate from 1868. ... Samarkand (Tajik: Самарқанд, Persian: ‎ , Uzbek: , Russian: ), population 412,300 in 2005, is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. ... Kokand (or Khokand or Kokhand or Quqon) is a city in eastern Uzbekistan, at the southwestern edge of the Fergana Valley. ... Dushanbe (Душанбе), population 562,000 people (2000 census), is the capital of Tajikistan. ...


Prior to the Partition of India, some Bukharan Jews could be found among the Afghan population of Peshawar in the North West Frontier Province of northwestern India, (now Pakistan). After partition and the creation of Israel, nearly all of these Jews left for Israel and other countries. One synagogue still exists in Peshawar but it's been closed for quite some time. This article is under construction. ... Bukharan Jews (Bukhoran Jews, Bukhari Jews) is a blanket term for Jews from Central Asia who speak Bukhori, a dialect of the Persian language. ... Peshāwar (Urdu: پشاور; Pashto: پښور) literally means City on the Frontier in Persian and is known as Pekhawar in Pashto. ... North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) is geographically the smallest of the four provinces of Pakistan. ... Peshāwar (Urdu: پشاور; Pashto: پښور) literally means City on the Frontier in Persian and is known as Pekhawar in Pashto. ...


Name and language

Interior of the Great Synagogue in Bukhara, sketch based on a photograph by Elkan Nathan Adler.

The term "Bukharan" was coined by European travelers who visited Central Asia around the 16th century. Since most of the Jewish community at the time lived under the Emirate of Bukhara, they came to be known as Bukharan Jews. They regarded themselves as "Isro'il" and "Yahudi." Image File history File links Bukharan3. ... Image File history File links Bukharan3. ... A synagogue (from Ancient Greek: , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; Hebrew: beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: , shul; Ladino: , esnoga) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ... Bukhara (Tajik: Бухоро; Persian: , Buxârâ; Uzbek: ; Russian: ), from the Soghdian βuxārak (lucky place), is the fifth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and capital of the Bukhara Province (viloyat). ... Elkan Nathan Adler (1861–1946) was an Anglo-Jewish author, lawyer, historian, and collector of manuscripts. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... The Emirate of Bukhara (1747-1920) was a state in Central Asia, with its capital in Bukhara and was a Russian protectorate from 1868. ... Anthem: Hatikvah (The Hope) Capital  Jerusalem Largest city Jerusalem Official languages Hebrew, Arabic Government Parliamentary democracy  - President Moshe Katsav1  - Prime Minister Ehud Olmert  - Knesset Speaker Dalia Itzik Independence from the League of Nations mandate administered by the United Kingdom   - Declaration 14 May 1948 (05 Iyar 5708)  Area  - Total 20,770... Map of the southern Levant, c. ...


Bukharian Jews used the Persian language to communicate among themselves and later developed "Bukhori", a distinct dialect of the Tajiki-Persian language with certain linguistic traces of Hebrew. This language provided easier communication with their neighboring communities and was used for all cultural and educational life among the Jews. It was used widely until the area was "russified" by the Russians and the dissemination of "religious" information was halted. Almost all Bukharian Jews today use Russian as their main language and a minority speak mostly Bukhori. Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Bukhori, also known as Bukharic or Bukharan, is an Indo-Iranian language. ... Tajik or Tadjik (тоҷикӣ, تاجیکی, tojikí) is a descendant of the Persian language spoken in Central Asia. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ...

A Bukharan Jewish girl, c.1900.

The community is neither Ashkenazi nor Sephardic. They are Mizrahi Jews. They have become one of the most isolated Jewish communities in the world. [2] Image File history File links Bukharan_girl. ... Image File history File links Bukharan_girl. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... Languages Hebrew, Dzhidi, Judæo-Arabic, Gruzinic, Bukhori, Judeo-Berber, Juhuri and Judæo-Aramaic Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, other Jewish ethnic divisions and Arabs. ...


History

The Bukharian community in Central Asia had periods of prospering, as well as periods of repression. With the establishment of the Silk Road between China and the West in the 2nd century BCE that lasted well into the 16th century, many Jews flocked to Emirate of Bukhara and played a great role in its development. After their exile from Israel in 135, they came under the Persian Empire, as they prospered and spread through the area. However, around the 5th century, they were persecuted. Famous Jewish academies in Babylon were closed, while many Jews were killed and expelled (See Mishnah). After Arab Muslim conquest in the early 8th century, Jews (as well as Christians) were considered Dhimmis and were forced, among other things, to pay the jizya head tax. The Mongol invasion in the 13th century also hit hard on Bukhori Jews. The Silk Road Silk Route redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... (3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events BC 168 Battle of Pydna -- Macedonian phalanx defeated by Romans BC 148 Rome conquers Macedonia BC 146 Rome destroys Carthage in the Third Punic War BC 146 Rome conquers... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Commanders Hadrian Simon Bar Kokhba Strength  ?  ? Casualties Unknown 580,000 Jews (mass civilian casualties), 50 fortified towns and 985 villages razed (per Cassius Dio). ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... A Dhimmi, or Zimmi (Arabic ذمّي), as defined in classical Islamic legal and political literature, is a person living in a Muslim state who is a member of an officially tolerated non-Muslim religion. ... In states ruled by Islamic law, jizya or jizyah (Arabic: جزْية; Ottoman Turkish cizye) is a per capita tax imposed on able bodied non-Muslim men of military age. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ...


In the beginning of the 16th century, the area was invaded and occupied by nomadic Uzbek tribes who established strict observance of Islam and religious fundamentalism. Confined to city quarters, the Jews were denied basic rights and many were forced to convert to Islam. By the middle of the 18th century practically all of Bukharan Jews lived in Bukharan Emirate. In 1843 Bukharan Jews collected 10,000 silver tan'ga and purchased land in Samarkand, known as Makhallai Yakhudion close to Registon. Kazakh nomads in the steppes of the Russian Empire, ca. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background live as a group in seclusion, voluntarily or involuntarily. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Emirate of Bukhara (1747-1920) was a feudal state in Central Asia, with its capital in Bukhara, a Russian protectorate since 1868. ... Samarkand (Tajik: Самарқанд, Persian: ‎ , Uzbek: , Russian: ), population 412,300 in 2005, is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. ...


At the beginning of 17th century the first synagogue had been constructed at Bukhara city. It was done in contravention of the law of Caliph Omar who had forbidden the construction of new synagogues as well as the destruction of those that existed in the pre-Islamic period. [1] The story of construction of the first Bukhara synagogue relates to two persons: Nodir Divan-Begi - important grandee, and nameless widow, who outwitted an official.

Jewish students with their teacher in Samarkand, ca. 1910.

In 1793, a Sefardi Jew from Tetuan, Morocco, named Yosef Maman traveled to Bukhara and found the local Jews in very poor condition, and he decided to settle there. He became a spiritual leader and changed the Persian religious tradition to Sephardic Jewish tradition. In the middle of the 19th century, Bukharan Jews began to move to the historic Land of Israel. Land on which they had settled in Jerusalem was called the Bukharan quarter (Sh'hunat Buhori) still exists today. Download high resolution version (704x630, 114 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (704x630, 114 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... ... Bukhara (Tajik: Бухоро; Persian: , Buxârâ; Uzbek: ; Russian: ), from the Soghdian βuxārak (lucky place), is the fifth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and capital of the Bukhara Province (viloyat). ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the... Kingdom of Israel: Early ancient historical Israel — land in pink is the approximate area under direct central royal administration during the United Monarchy. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


In 1865, Russian troops took over Tashkent, and there was a large influx of Jews to the newly created Turkestan Region. From 1876 to 1916, dozens of Bukharan Jews held prestigious jobs, and some Jews prospered. Jews were free to practice Judaism. 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Tashkent Tashkent (Uzbek: , Russian: , English: ) is the current capital of Uzbekistan and also of Tashkent Province. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Soviet era

Bukharan Jews celebrating Sukkot, c. 1900.

With the establishment of Soviet rule on the territory in 1917, Jewish life seriously deteriorated. Throughout 1920s and 1930s, thousands of Jews, fleeing religious oppression, confiscation of property, arrests, and repressions, escaped (often by foot) to The British Mandate of Palestine[citation needed]. World War II and the Holocaust brought over a million Jewish refugees from the European regions of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe through Uzbekistan. In the early 1970s one of the largest Bukharan Jewish emigrations in History occurred as the Jews of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan emigrated to Israel and the United States due to looser restrictions on immigration. Image File history File links Bukharan2. ... Image File history File links Bukharan2. ... Sukkot (סוכות or סֻכּוֹת sukkōt, booths) or Succoth or Sukkos is a Biblical pilgrimage festival which occurs in autumn on the 15th day of the month of Tishri (early- to late-October). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... ... In the course of history, Jewish populations have been expelled or ostracised by various local authorities and have sought asylum from Anti-Semitism numerous times. ... Map of Eastern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ...


After 1991

With the disintegration of the Soviet Union and foundation of the independent Republic of Uzbekistan in 1991, there was an abrupt growth of nationalism, chauvinism, and xenophobia in Uzbek public consciousness. Advent of Islamic fundamentalism in Uzbekistan caused a sudden increase in the level of emigration of Jews (both Bukharan and Ashkenazi). For the next two decades, about 100,000 immigrated to Israel, another 50,000 to the USA (mainly Queens, New York) and about 2,000 still remain in Uzbekistan and less than 1,000 in Tajikistan (compared to 15,000 in Tajikistan 1989) This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Chauvinism is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. ... Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, Aškanazi,Aškanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAškănāzî, ʾAškănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ...


Currently, Bukharan Jews are mostly concentrated in the USA (New York City, Arizona, Atlanta, Denver, San Diego), as well as Israel, Austria, Russia, and Uzbekistan. New York City's 108th Street in Forest Hills Queens, is filled with Bukharan restaurants and gift shops. They have formed a tight-knit enclave in this area that was once primarily inhabited by Ashkenazi Jews. “New York, NY” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... “New York, NY” redirects here. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ...


On the dawn of the Jewish New Year 5765 (2005), the Bukharan Jewish Community of Queens (mainly Rego Park and Forest Hills) celebrated the opening of the Bukharian Jewish Congress. This establishment further reflects the growing Bukharan community in Queens and their desire to preserve their identity in an ever-changing world. Rego Park is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Queens. ... Station Square, home to Forest Hills striking Long Island Rail Road station. ...


In early 2006, the still-active Dushanbe synagogue in Tajikistan as well as the city's mikveh (ritual bath), kosher butchery, and Jewish classrooms were demolished by the government (without compensation to the community) to make room for a new Presidential residence. After an international outcry, the government of Tajikistan reversed their decision and will allow the synagogue to be rebuilt on its current site. The Dushanbe Synagogue of Tajikistan functioned between early in the 1900s and February 2006. ...


Culture

Bukharan Jews had their own dress code, similar to but also different from other cultures (mainly mongolo-turkik cultures) living in Central Asia. On weddings today, one can still observe the bride and the close relatives put on the traditional kaftan (Jomah-джома-ג'ומא in Bukharian and Tajik) and the richly-embroidered fur-lined hats and dance. Clothing has various sociological functions, including: conspicuous consumption stating or claiming identity establishing, maintaining and defying sociological group norms Thus wearing specific types of clothing or the manner of wearing clothing can convey messages about class, income, belief and attitude. ... This kaftan was a gift from Venetians to Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent in the 16th century. ...


Although their presence in Central Asia has dissipated, Bukharans remain proud of their Jewish heritage and almost all of them are Zionists. Even though they only came to the United States, Israel, etc 10-15 years ago without a penny in their pockets, they were able to succeed. A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


Music

The Bukharans have a distinct music called Shashmaqam, which is an ensemble of stringed instruments, infused with Central Asian rhythms, Muslim melodies, touches of klezmer, and even a few Spanish chords. Klezmer (from Yiddish כּלי־זמיר, etymologically from Hebrew kli zemer כלי זמר, musical instrument) is a musical tradition which parallels Hasidic and Ashkenazic Judaism. ... Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ...


Cuisine

Bukharan cuisine consists mainly of shish kabobs of chicken, beef or lamb. Plov is a very popular rice dish that contains carrots and is often topped with beef or lamb. Bukharans have two main types of bread. One is called Non, which is a circular bread topped with black sesame seeds, and the other is called Noni Toki, which is hubcap matzoh. List of Dishes Qurighan - Chicken and deep fried potatoes Bakhsh - Green plov, comes in Qazan and Bag varieties. ... Shish kebab (şişkebabı; also pronounced Kabab or kabob) means skewer of meat in Persian. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... Plov (Uzbek: плов, Russian: плов) is the national dish of Uzbekistan. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Brown basmati rice Terrace of paddy fields in Yunnan Province, southern China. ... Binomial name Daucus carota L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is a crop grown primarily for its oil-rich seeds. ... Matza (also Matzoh, Matzah, Matzo, Hebrew מַצָּה maṣṣā), an unleavened bread, is the official food of Passover. ...


Notable Bukharan Jews

  • Jacques Abramoff (1927-1997) - Monegasque Businessman, Inventor, past President of the Monaco Jewish Community
  • Sarit Hadad, the Israeli princess of mizrachi music
  • Asaf Achildiev - doctor involved in the French Resistance, World War II hero
  • Aron Aronov - culture & languages scholar, American Bukharian activist, Director of Bukharan Jewish Museum, former languages translator for Richard Nixon
  • Jacob Arabo, also known as "The King of Bling Bling" - proprietor of Jacob & Co.
  • Rahmin Badalov (1897-1991) - member of the Bukharan intelligentsia, decorated WWII hero, linguist, writer, translator
  • Arthur Benjamin, MD - First Ophthalmologist in Los Angeles to perform Cataract Surgery with a Restor lens implant.
  • Aulov Borisovich - theatrical art director and pioneer, actor, decorated WWII hero
  • Yosef Davydov - Tashkenti entrepreneur & Israeli philanthropist
  • Rena Galibova - Soviet actress, "People's Artist of Tajikistan"
  • Meirkhaim Gavrielov - Journalist murdered in Tajikistan in 1998.
  • Nathan Gilkarov - Economist, philosopher
  • Shimon Haham - Literary icon
  • Barno Is'hakova - Soviet singer
  • Hai Issaharov - Jewish Legion of British Army, Arab-Jewish peacemaker, engineer, Israeli aviation pioneer, Israeli Independence hero, Israeli Deputy Minister of Defense for Air Affairs
  • Lev Leviev - billionaire businessman, philanthropist, president of the Bukharian Jewish Congress
  • Shlomo Moussaieff - antiquities dealer to Liz Taylor, the Sultan of Brunei, and Queen Elizabeth II - Israeli Independence prisoner of war, Jewish-Arab peacemaker
  • Shoista Mullodzhanova - Famous Bukharian Shashmakom singer, "People's Artist of Tajikistan"
  • Yudik Mullodzhanov - Bukharian Jewish musician/ singer
  • Gavriel Mullokandov – Shashmakom artist, "People's Artist of Uzbekistan"
  • Boruch Mullokandov - Son of Gavriel, medical student, WWII Red Army volunteer, Nazi POW saved by Muslim hero
  • Schlomo Mushkanodov -Hero of 1783 Bukhara rebuke to pogrom
  • Alex Pilosov - Internet entrepreneur, rap artist
  • Yakov-Hai Pinkhasov - Bukharan Jewish leader
  • Rafael Potelyahov - Turkestani entrepreneur, philanthropist, and capitalist revolutionary
  • John Safran - Australian comedian
  • Gavriel Samandarov - writer
  • Anthony Yadgaroff - British Businessman, Jewish community leader
  • Tamara Aranbayeva - Writer, Jewish Community Leader, and Philosophical Revolutionary
  • Jack Abramov - President, Chairman, and CEO, House of Taylor Jewelry
  • Sulyman Tahalov - Chairman of the Israeli Opera house - President of the Tel' Aviv Jewish Music School - known as the king of strings
  • Arkadiy Manevich Pinkhasov - Helped a lot of people as a neuiologist in Margilan, Uzbekistan during the Soviet Union.
  • Rudolph Abramov - TechnoMaster watch creator and mass marketing silicon diamonds as SIH Diamond's for increased profit.
  • Gabriel Mordechaev - First Bukharian Chef in America. One of the most internationally renowned Chefs dating back to 1981.

Jacques Abramoff Jacques Abramoff (1927-1997) businessman, philantropist, inventor, born in Tachkent (Uzbekistan). ... Sarit on TV Sarit Hadad (Hebrew: שרית חדד, born September 20, 1978) is a popular Israeli singer. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Aaron Aronov is the leader in the movement to preserve Bukharian history and culture and the director of the Museum for the Heritage of Bukharan Jews. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Meirkhaim Gavrielov (Russian: Миерхаим Гавриэлов) was a journalist murdered in Tajikistan in 1998. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Jewish Legion was the name for five battalions of Jewish volunteers established as the British Armys 38th through 42nd (Service) Battalions of the Royal Fusiliers. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Lev Avnerovich Leviev (born 30 July 1956, Tashkent) is an Israeli businessman with wide-ranging interests, including in the diamond trade, real estate and chemicals. ... Shlomo Moussaieff (born c. ... This article is about the actress. ... The Sultan of Brunei is the head of state of Brunei. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gavriel Mullokandov (April 8, 1900-1972) – The greatest Bukharian Jewish singer and musician. ... This Australian media personality is not to be confused with the American author Jonathan Safran Foer. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

External links

  • Bukharian Jewish Global Portal
  • "Bukharian Entertainment and News at your Fingertips"
  • "Rescue of Jews of Bukharan in occupied France"
  • "The Silk Road Leads to Queens"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bukharian Jews USA-Culture/History/Business/Health/Travel/Education/literature/Life/Judaism ... (324 words)
The Jews in Uzbekistan were affiliated with two communities: (1) the ancient one, the Jews of Bukhara, who speak a Tajiki-Jewish dialect; (2) the new one, of Eastern European origin.
According to their tradition, the Bukharan Jews emigrated from Persia at the time of the persecutions of King Peroz (458–485), while some consider themselves as descendants of the exiles of Samaria, on the assumption that "Habor" (II Kings 17:6) is Bukhara.
Jews of Uzbekistan emigrated to Khazaria and China because of their location at the crossroads of the caravans that traveled there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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