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Encyclopedia > Buju Banton
Buju Banton
Buju Banton performing at Ilosaarirock, 2006
Buju Banton performing at Ilosaarirock, 2006
Background information
Birth name Mark Anthony Myrie
Also known as Gargamel
Born July 15, 1973 (1973-07-15) (age 34)
Origin Kingston, Jamaica
Genre(s) Reggae, Dancehall, Roots reggae
Associated acts Beres Hammond
Website www.gargamelmusic.com

Buju Banton (born Mark Anthony Myrie on July 15, 1973) is a Jamaican dancehall, ragga, and reggae musician. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2448 × 3264 pixel, file size: 2. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica and is located on the southeastern coast of the island country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Roots reggae is a spiritual Rastafari subgenre of reggae music with lyrics that often include praise for Jah Ras Tafari Makonnen, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia; the Emperor of Ethiopia. ... Beres Hammond (b. ... People known as Mark Anthony (with variations of spelling) include: Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius) - statesman in Ancient Rome Marc Anthony - singer/songwriter. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Not to be confused with Rāga. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ...

Contents

Biography

Buju Banton was born near Kingston, Jamaica in a poor neighborhood called Salt Lane. "Buju" is a nickname given to chubby children which means Breadfruit. The name is ironic in light of Mark Myrie's slim frame, but it is, nevertheless, the nickname his mother gave him as a child. "Banton" is a Jamaican word referring to someone with a superior attitude and a gift with speech, but it was also the name of a local artist Burro Banton that Buju admired as a child. It was Burro's rough gravelly vocals that Buju emulated and ultimately made his own. Buju's mother was a higgler, or street vendor, while his father worked as a labourer at a tile factory. He was one of fifteen children born into a family which was directly descended from the Maroons, a group of escaped slaves who proudly fought off the British colonialists. He is the uncle of successful singer Sean Kingston.[citation needed] The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica and is located on the southeastern coast of the island country. ... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... This article is about common table salt. ... The word lane has two meanings: a portion of a paved roadway which is intended for a single line of vehicles and is marked by white or yellow lines. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Obesity is a condition in which the natural energy reserve, stored in the fatty tissue of humans and other mammals, is increased to a point where it is associated with certain health conditions or increased mortality. ... Binomial name Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg The Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) is a tree and fruit native to the Malay Peninsula and western Pacific islands. ... Ironic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Light (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... Love gift Man presents a cut of meat to a youth with a hoop. ... Look up speech, speaking, utter, gab in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Burro Banton (born Donovan Spalding, December 27, 1956, Kingston, Jamaica) is a dancehall reggae deejay popular in the mid 80s and 90s. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Equus asinus Linnaeus, 1758 The donkey, a. ... Gravel (largest fragment in this photo is about 4 cm) Gravel is rock that is of a certain particle size range. ... For other uses, see Mother (disambiguation). ... A city-centre street in Frankfurt, Germany A residential street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA A street is a public thoroughfare in the built environment. ... A vendor is one who sells something. ... For other uses, see Father (disambiguation). ... Mission, or barrel, roof tiles A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, porcelain, metal or even glass. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Fifteen may refer to: 15, the cardinal number between 14 and 16 The year 15 Fifteen, a chain of restaurants created by Jamie Oliver Fifteen, a teen soap on Nickelodeon during the 1990s (known in Canada as Hillside) Fifteen, the punk rock band Fifteen (15), the movie Fifteen, 2006 Buckcherry... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... The word Maroon can have the following meanings: Maroon is a color mixture composed of brown and purple. ... Slave redirects here. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Kisean Anderson (born February 3, 1990) better known by his stage name Sean Kingston, is a Jamaican American reggae singer and rapper. ...


As a youngster, Buju would often watch his favorite artists perform at outdoor shows and local dancehalls. At the age of 12 he picked up the microphone for himself and began toasting under the monicker of "Gargamel". His first single, "The Ruler" was released not long afterwards in 1987 under the production of Robert French. For other uses, see Watch (disambiguation). ... An artist is someone who employs creative talent to produce works of art. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Microphones redirects here. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ... HTS could refer to: Highway Transportation System High-throughput screening Home Team Sports, former cable/satellite regional sports network serving the Washington/Baltimore region, supplanted by Comcast SportsNet Mid-Atlantic. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Day of Dupes is the name given to the day in November of 1630 on which the enemies of Cardinal Richelieu believed that they had succeeded in persuading Louis XIII, King of France, to dismiss Richelieu from power. ...


Career

In 1991, Buju joined Donovan Germain's Penthouse Label and began a fruitful partnership with producer Dave Kelly who later launched his own Madhouse Records label. Buju is one of the most popular musicians in Jamaican history, having burst onto the charts there suddenly in 1992, with "Bogle" and "Love me Browning", both massive hits in Jamaica. Controversy erupted over Love Me Browning which spoke of Banton's preference for light-skinned women: "Mi love mi car mi love mi house mi love mi money and ting, but most of all mi love mi browning." Some accused Banton of promoting a colonialist attitude and denigrating the beauty of black women. In response, he released "Black Women" which spoke of his love for dark-skinned beauties: "Mi nuh Stop cry, fi all black woman, respect all the girls dem with dark complexion." 1992 was an explosive year for Buju as he broke the great Bob Marley's record for the greatest number of number one singles in a year. Beginning with "Man fi Dead", Buju's gruff voice dominated the Jamaican airwaves for the duration of the year. Banton's debut album, Mr. Mention, includes his greatest hits from that year. 1992 saw the release of the the song "Boom Bye Bye" that advocated the killing and torturing of gay people. Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Germain is the name of more than one thing: Germain automobile is a car marque from Belgium. ... In architecture, a penthouse is a building on the roof of another building, or alternatively, an apartment on the top floor of a building. ... A label is any kind of tag attached with adhesive to something so as to identify the object or its contents. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy a proposed guideline for notability (see Wikipedia:Notability (people)). If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Madhouse Records is a recording company founded by Dave Kelly and his partner Janet Davidson. ... Arawaks from South America had settled in Jamaica at around 1,000AD and called the land Xamayca, meaning land of wood and water. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Power is an African American talk radio channel on the XM Satellite Radio service. ... For other uses, see Light (disambiguation). ... This article is about the organ. ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... House at Cúcuta, Colombia A house is a building typically lived in by one or more people. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... For beauty as a characteristic of a persons appearance, see Physical attractiveness. ... This article is about the color. ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... Diverse women. ... Plural of Girl. ... Complexion describes ones physical appearance. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... This article is about the reggae musician. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Windeby (Danish: Vindeby) is a municipality in the district of Rendsburg-Eckernförde, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... The word voice can be used to refer to: Sound: The human voice. ... For the meaning of the word dominance in genetics, please see Dominance relationship Dominance in the context of biology and anthropology is the state of having high social status relative to other individuals, who react submissively to dominant individuals. ... Airwaves is an album by Badfinger, recorded in 1978 and released 1979. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Look up debut in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Robert Mills may mean: Robert Mills (architect) (1781-1855), an American architect Robert Mills (physicist) (1927-1999), an American physicist Robert Bob Mills, Canadian politician Robert P. Mills (1920-1986), an American crime and science fiction magazine editor Robert Lee Mills (died 2006) former president of Georgetown College Robert Mills... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the musical composition. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ...


Banton released the hard-hitting Voice of Jamaica in 1993. The album included a number of conscious tracks. These tracks included "Deportees" a song which criticized those Jamaicans who went abroad but never sent money home, and a remix of Little Roy's "Tribal War," a sharp condemnation of political violence, and "Willy, Don't Be Silly" which promoted condom use. Archives and Artifacts (2005) is a box set by the band Death Angel, consisting of remasters of their first two albums The Ultra-Violence and Frolic Through the Park, as well as a bonus CD, and a DVD with video recordings of the band and a music video. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... The word track can have different meanings: a railroad track: see rail tracks a trail, informal road or pathway a copper trace or line on a PCB a distinct section (mostly on song) of a sound recording, such as a gramophone record, compact disc, audio cassette and other recording media. ... The Royal Order of Vasa (Kungliga Vasaorden) was a Swedish Royal order of chivalry, awarded to citizens of Sweden for service to state and society especially agriculture, mining and commerce. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... Roy may refer to: Roy, New Mexico, USA Roy, Utah, USA Roy, Washington, USA Arundhati Roy, an Indian novelist and peace activist Brandon Roy, American basketball player Bryan Roy, Dutch football (soccer) player Deep Roy, actor Derek Roy, Canadian ice hockey player Fabien Roy, politician Gabrielle Roy, author Indra Lal... The generalised concept of radiative forcing in climate science is any change in the radiation (heat) entering the climate system or changes in radiatively active gases. ... Political terrorism is a form of terrorism (a tactic of violence that targets civilians) used to influence socio-political events so that gains occur that might not have otherwise happened by peaceful means or by conventional warfare. ... Gary Thomas is an American jazz saxophonist from Baltimore, Maryland. ... This article is about the male contraceptive device. ...


Late in 1994, Buju was affected by the death of his friend Garnett Silk. This was compounded by the violent deaths of a number of dancehall artists that year. Buju embraced The Rastafari Movement and started to grow dreadlocks. His performances and musical releases took on a more spiritual tone, and he issued calls renouncing violence. One of such calls can be heard on the classic "Murderer" later released on his biggest international seller 'Til Shiloh. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... Friendship is a term used to denote co-operative and supportive behavior between two or more humans. ... Garnet Silk , 2nd April 1966 - December 10th 1994 ( born Garnet Damion Smith in Bromelia, in the parish of Manchester, Jamaica) was a reggae musician. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Haile Selassie I Rasta, or the Rastafari movement, is a religion and philosophy that accepts Haile Selassie I, the former Emperor of Ethiopia, as God incarnate, whom they call Jah[1]. He is also seen as part of the Holy Trinity as the messiah promised in the Bible to return. ... Rastaman with long locks Dreadlocks, sometimes simply called locks or dreads, are interlocked coils of hair which tend to form by themselves, in all hair types, if the hair is washed regularly and allowed to grow naturally without the use of brushes, combs, razors, or scissors for a long period... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


'Til Shiloh (1995) was a very influential album, using a studio band instead of synthesized music, and marking a slight shift away from dancehall towards roots reggae for Banton. Buju claimed to have adopted Rastafarianism and his new album reflected his new beliefs. 'Til Shiloh successfully blended conscious lyrics with a hard-hitting dancehall vibe. The album included a single called "Murderer" which condemned the violence in Jamaican dancehall music, inspired by the murders of dancehall musicians Panhead and Dirtsman. The song inspired several clubs to stop playing songs with excessively violent subject matter. Untold Stories revealed an entirely different Buju Banton from the one that had stormed to dancehall stardom. It is regarded by many as some of his best work, and is a staple in the Banton performance repertoire. Reminiscient in mood and delivery to Redemption Song by Bob Marley, Untold Stories won Buju Banton many favorable comparisons to the late singer. This conscious album had a large impact on dancehall music and showed the hunger the dancehall massive had for conscious lyrics. Dancehall music did not move away from slack and violent lyrics, but the album did pave the way for a greater spirituality within the music. In the wake of Buju's transformation to Rastafarianism, many artists, such as Capleton, converted to the faith and started to denounce violence. Sleeping Giant may refer to: In geology: Sleeping Giant (Connecticut), trap rock ridge system located in the Mount Carmel neighborhood of Hamden, Connecticut Sleeping Giant (Ontario), formation of mesas on Sibley Peninsula which resembles a giant lying on its back In music: Sleeping Giant (band), a Christian Metal band from... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine. ... Band may mean: A musical band A band (electronics) is a range of frequencies or wavelengths between two given limits In anthropology, a band society A Rubber band In solid-state physics, an energy band The Band, a particular musical band See also: bandana This is a disambiguation page — a... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Roots reggae is a spiritual Rastafari subgenre of reggae music with lyrics that often include praise for Jah Ras Tafari Makonnen, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia; the Emperor of Ethiopia. ... Haile Selassie, Rastafari God and King Rastafarianism, or as adherents prefer to call it, the Rastafari movemant, or simply Rasta, is a religious movement that reveres the former emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie I - who as King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and as the Lion of Judah, is... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Kiss of Death is a 1995 crime/detective thriller which is a remake of the 1947 film of the same name which starred Richard Widmark. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... // Look up pan, pan-, Pan, PAN in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Head (disambiguation). ... Look up dirt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... Look up staple in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up mood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Childbirth in a hospital. ... Redemption is also a collectible card game. ... This article is about the musical composition. ... This article is about the reggae musician. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Hunger is a feeling experienced when the glycogen level of the liver falls below a threshold, usually followed by a desire to eat. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Look up lyrics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Haile Selassie, Rastafari God and King Rastafarianism, or as adherents prefer to call it, the Rastafari movemant, or simply Rasta, is a religious movement that reveres the former emperor of Ethiopia, Haile Selassie I - who as King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and as the Lion of Judah, is... | Died = | Origin = [imortal[Image:Flag of Jamaica. ... For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ...


Inna Heights (1997) substantially increased Banton's international audience as Buju explored his singing ability and recorded a number of roots-tinged tracks. Banton covered the Silvertones' "Destiny" and recorded songs with such artists as Beres Hammond and the legendary Toots Hibbert. The album was well-received but had distribution problems. Also, some fans were disappointed, having hoped for another ground-breaking album like "Til Shiloh." Still, Buju's experimentation and soaring vocals impressed many fans and this album remains a highly regarded work. The Lord Chamberlains Men was the playing company that William Shakespeare worked for as actor and playwright for most of his career. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Vortex always gives you a ride to remember. ... Francesca Alexander, also known as Fanny Alexander, (February 27, 1837 - January 21, 1917) was an American illustrator, author, and translator from the Italian. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Stewart Boswell (born 29 July 1978 in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory) is a professional squash player from Australia. ... Frederick Toots Hibbert (born 1946) is a legendary Ska and roots reggae singer and leader of the reggae band Toots and the Maytals. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Portable soup was a precursor of modern bouillon cubes and dehydrated food. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Look up work in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1998, Buju met the punk band Rancid and recorded three tracks with them: "Misty Days", "Hooligans" and "Life Won't Wait." The latter became the title track of Rancid's 1998 album, Life Won't Wait. Subsequently, Buju signed with Anti- Records, a subsidiary of Brett Gurewitz's Epitaph records, and released Unchained Spirit in 2000. The album showcases the most diverse aspects of Buju Banton. It carried little of the roots feel heard on Til Shiloh and also virtually none of the hardcore driving sound that had brought him to public acclaim early in his career. It was a departure that many fans felt uncomfortable with. By now, however, he had been enshrined in the minds of reggae lovers as one of the most notable artists of his time, and seemed to have earned the right to some artistic freedom. John Russell, 1st Earl Russell, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1846-1852, 1865-1866. ... Rancid is a punk rock band formed in 1991 in Berkeley, California, by Matt Freeman and Tim Armstrong (former members of Operation Ivy). ... Alternative metal is an eclectic form of music that gained popularity in the early 1990s alongside grunge. ... Rancid is a punk rock band formed in 1991 in Berkeley, California, by Matt Freeman and Tim Armstrong (former members of Operation Ivy). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of cities in Djibouti Ali Sabīĥ Dikhil Djibouti City (Jibūti) Tadjourah (Tajūrah) Obock (Ubuk) Categories: East Africa geography stubs | Lists of cities | Djibouti ... Anti- Records is a record label that is a part of the Epitaph Records group. ... Brett is a first name: Brett Anderson, former lead singer of Suede Brett Angell, English footballer Brett Austin, New Zealand breaststroke swimmer Brett Claywell, American Actor Brett Emerton, Australian Football (soccer) player (currently at Blackburn Rovers) Brett Favre, NFL football player Brett Hodgson, Australian rugby league player Brett Hopper, fictional... Stephen Tennant (21 April 1906 - 28 February 1987) was a British aristocrat known for his decadent lifestyle. ... Casado con Hijos is a Chilean television series and remake of Married. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Roots is: The plural of Root Roots (album) Roots (TV miniseries), a mini-series based on a novel by Alex Haley Roots: The Saga of an American Family, a novel by Alex Haley Roots Canada Ltd. ... General public redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Look up freedom in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Several singles followed in the start of the new decade, mostly without the trademark spitfire delivery typical of dancehall, but displaying Banton's talent for a mellower more introspective approach. In March 2003 he released Friends for Life, which featured more sharply political songs, including "Mr. Nine," an anti-gun song that further verified his status as one of reggae's most socially aware artists. The album has a strong political message for the African Diaspora and features excerpts from a speech made by Marcus Garvey. Paid Not Played is included and shows his gradual return to the themes more popular in dancehall. The album also featured some hip-hop influence with the inclusion of Fat Joe. For other senses of this word, see decade (disambiguation). ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... For other uses, see March (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Guido de Lavezaris (b. ... This is a list of anime with varying levels of ecchi. ... This article is about the video game. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... The African diaspora was the movement of Africans and their descendants to places throughout the world - predominantly to the Americas, then later to Europe, the Middle East and other corners of the globe. ... Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Breakdance, an early form of hip hop dance, often involves battles, showing off skills without any physical contact with the adversaries. ... Joseph Antonio Cartagena (born August 19, 1970), better known by his stage name Fat Joe, is an American rapper of Puerto Rican descent, and is signed to Imperial Records. ...


Too Bad was released in September of 2006. The pure dancehall album shows a clear return to basics. Banton amassed a number of edgy chart-toppers in the recent past and includes them almost as a reminder of the stuff that made him who he is. The most danceable Banton album since Mr. Mention, Too Bad features an unapologetic Buju over hard driving dancehall beats. The title track Too Bad was one in a tidal wave of releases that reestablished Buju as a prominent hit-maker on the hardcore scene.[citation needed] New Zealand Cricket, formerly the New Zealand Cricket Board, is the governing body for professional cricket in New Zealand. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Dancehall is a type of Jamaican popular music which developed around the late 70s, with exponents such as Yellowman and Shabba Ranks. ... Propanoic anhydride, also called propionic anhydride, is a simple carboxylic anhydride. ...

Buju Banton performing in 2007
Buju Banton performing in 2007

The album Rasta Got Soul, rumored to be a more introspective use of his talent was widely anticipated even prior to the release of Too Bad. The tune Magic City has been an underground hit for Banton, and displays a very musically mature artist. Expectations for the release of this work run high in the reggae community.[citation needed] First International U-21: Croatia 2-0 Denmark Å ibenik, March 28, 1997 Largest win U-21: Croatia 6-1 Bosnia and Herzegovina Osijek, September 5, 1997 Worst defeat ?? (Records for competitive matches only) UEFA U-21 Championship Appearances 2 (First in 2000) Best result Group stage 2000 & 2004 edit The... The Office of the Historian, United States Department of State, is within the Bureau of Public Affairs. ... Sexual maturity is the stage at which an organism can reproduce. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ...


He performed at the Cricket World Cup 2007 Opening Ceremony with Third World and Beres Hammond. The 2007 ICC Cricket World Cup is currently taking place in the West Indies from March 13 to April 28, 2007. ... The Cricket World Cup 2007 Opening Ceremony was held on Sunday, 11 March 2007 at Trelawny Stadium in Kingston, Jamaica. ... Third World is a Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. ... Beres Hammond (b. ...


In 2008 he did a Soca collaboration "Wining Season (remix)" with Machel Montano of Trinidad and Tobago on Machel's album Flame on. 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Soca, or soul calypso, is a dance music that originated in Trinidad from calypso. ... Machel Jesus Montano (born November 1974 in Trinidad and Tobago) is a soca singer, record producer and songwriter based in the Caribbean. ...


Controversies

Cannabis cultivation

On April 5, 2004 Banton was fined the equivalent of US$9000 for the possession and cultivation of cannabis after 2 mature marijuana plants were discovered growing at his studio in December 2003. He defended himself by stating that he just came from a long tour and found the plants there.[1] is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cannabis cultivation may mean or refer to: Cannabis (drug) cultivation, about the cultivation of cannabis as a source of drug substances. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Homophobia

Buju Banton has made inflammatory statements against homosexuals at his live concerts, including remarks such as "There is no end to the war between me and faggot," persisting despite criticism.[2] Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Faggot or fagot may refer to: Faggot (epithet), a derogatory term for a homosexual or effeminate male Faggot (wood), a bundle of sticks or branches Faggots (novel), a novel by Larry Kramer Faggot (unit of measurement), an archaic unit of measurement Fagot (pronounced with a silent T), the NATO reporting...


In July 2004, the Guardian Unlimited published an article, claiming that Jamaican police were seeking Banton after an armed attack on gay men in Kingston. According to the published article, Banton was allegedly one of a group of about a dozen armed men who forced their way into a house in Kingston on the morning of June 24 and beat the occupants while shouting anti-gay slogans and insults, according to the victims, two of whom were taken to the hospital. Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... House at Cúcuta, Colombia A house is a building typically lived in by one or more people. ... // There are a large number of places named Kingston: Jamaica Kingston, Jamaica, the capital United Kingdom Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England Kingston upon Thames, Greater London, England Kingston, Cambridgeshire, Cambridgeshire, England Kingston, Devon, Devon, England Kingston, Dorset, Dorset, England Kingston, East Lothian, East Lothian, Scotland Kingston, Hampshire... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anti-gay slogans are catchphrases or slogans which express opposition to homosexuality in ways which gay rights activists consider to be irrationally hostile or fearful (see homophobia and also anti-gay). ...


On October 1, 2005 Banton appeared in Court and had his $50,000 bail extended. According to the Jamaica Observer, he had appeared in court with his attorney to have his bail conditions altered to allow him to work. He had previously been required to report to the Constant Spring Police Station three times weekly, the Magistrate reduced this to once per week. He plead not guilty to the charge. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Observer can refer to: United Kingdom The Observer, a British newspaper and the worlds first Sunday newspaper. ...


On January 16, 2006 Banton was acquitted of all charges related to the alleged assault. is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The July 23, 2007 Guardian Unlimited reported that Banton was among a number of reggae artists who signed a pledge to refrain from performing homophobic songs or making homophobic statements. The agreement was brokered by the London-based Stop Murder Music group, whose protests against Banton and the other artists anti-gay lyrics had resulted in numerous concert cancellations and lost sponsorships. However subsequent reports dispute whether Banton actually did reach an agreement with the groups.[3] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ...


Discography

Studio albums

Plan 9 from Bell Labs is a distributed operating system, primarily used as a research vehicle. ... Aurora Train Station is a train station and registered historic building in Aurora, Ohio, listed in the National Register on 1986-05-22. ... Location Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum (Since 1968) Oakland, California (Since 1968) 1968 Information Owner(s) Charles O. Finley Manager(s) Bob Kennedy Local television Local radio The Oakland Athletics 1968 season involved the As finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 82 wins and 80... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority operates a number of bus routes in Staten Island, New York, United States. ... Unterseeboot 864 (U-864) was a German Type IXD U-boat sunk on February 9, 1945 by the British submarine HMS Venturer, killing all 73 onboard. ...

Compilations

Our Car Club is a song written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love for the American pop band The Beach Boys. ... See house House OR In mathmatics, there exists a Householder transformation Categories: Disambiguation ... Hoyales de Roa is a municipality located in the province of Burgos, Castile and León, Spain. ... The Fugitive is an American television series produced by QM Productions and United Artists Television that aired on ABC from 1963-1967. ... Oost Gelre is a municipality and a city in the eastern Netherlands. ... The Naval Service is the maritime branch of the British Armed Forces. ...

Singles

Murderer " Driver A", Champion, Untold Stories, Wanna Be Loved, Destiny, Senismillia persecution, Don't Cry, Circumstances, Nothing, Too Bad. Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ...


References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Target Demographic Buju Banton is dead wrong, but he's hatin' anyway. Miami New Times. June 1, 2006.
  3. ^ Scourge of the rogues. New York Daily News. August 16, 2007.

External links

  • Buju Banton Website
  • Buju's official myspace page
  • discogs.com entry
  • Realvibez.com: Buju Banton music videos

  Results from FactBites:
 
Buju Banton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1541 words)
Buju Banton (born Mark Myrie 1973) is a Jamaican dancehall, ragga, and reggae singer.
Buju's mother was a higgler, or street vendor while his father worked as a labourer at a tile factory.
According to the published article, Banton was allegedly one of a group of about a dozen armed men who forced their way into a house in Kingston on the morning of June 24 and beat the occupants while shouting anti-gay slogans and insults, according to the victims, two of whom were taken to the hospital.
Buju Banton - definition of Buju Banton in Encyclopedia (325 words)
Buju Banton (born Mark Myrie 1973) is a Jamaican dancehall and ragga singer.
"Banton" is a Jamaican word referring to someone with a superior attitude, but was also the name of a local artist (Burro Banton) that Buju watched as a child.
Banton, who had just signed to Mercury Records, was forced by his label to issue a statement; he refused to apologize and cited his religion (Rastafarianism) as the basis for his beliefs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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