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Encyclopedia > Buffyverse canon

The Buffyverse canon consists of materials that are thought to be genuine (or "official") and those events, characters, settings, etc., that are considered to have inarguable existence within the fictional universe established by the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. The Buffyverse is expanded through other additional materials such as comics, novels, pilots, promos and video games which do not necessarily take place in the exact same fictional continuity as the Buffy episodes and Angel episodes. Star Trek, Star Wars, and other prolific sci-fi/fantasy franchises have similarly gathered complex fictional continuities through hundreds of stories told in different formats.[1] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American cult television series that initially aired from March 10, 1997 until May 20, 2003. ... Buffyverse is a term coined by fans of Joss Whedons first two television shows to refer to the shared fictional universe in which they are set. ... The Chosen Collection of Buffy the Vampire Slayer (seasons 1 - 7). ... The following is a list of episodes for the American cult television series, Angel. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Star Wars is an epic science fantasy saga and fictional universe created by George Lucas during the late 1970s. ...

Contents

Definition

Using the religious analogy of a canon of Scripture, things that are not canon are considered "apocryphal". See Biblical canon. When a body of work is not specifically accepted or rejected by an authority, 'canon' can be a fluid term that is interpreted differently by different people. This is the case with 'Buffyverse canon', which has yet to be publicly defined by an authority to the satisfaction and consensus of all fans (see: links to canon debates). The creator of the Buffyverse, Joss Whedon, has implied that additional materials he was not heavily involved in creating were separate from canon.[2] When asked in an interview about canon, Whedon stated: Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... In the context of fiction Apocrypha includes those fictional stories that do not belong within a fictional univeres canon, yet still have some authority relating to that fictional universe. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... The Buffyverse canon consists of materials that are thought to be genuine (or official) and those events, characters, settings, etc. ... Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ...

Canon is key, as is continuity. If you are massive nerd. Which I am. I believe there's a demarcation between the creation and ancillary creations by different people. I'm all for that stuff, just like fanfic, but I like to know what's there's an absolutely official story-so-far, especially when something changes mediums, which my stuff seems to do a lot.[3]

Television series

The events seen on-screen in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel are considered canonical.[4] Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American cult television series that initially aired from March 10, 1997 until May 20, 2003. ... Angel is a spin-off of the American television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


Comics and novels

Outside of the TV series, the Buffyverse has been expanded and elaborated on by various authors and artists in the so-called "Buffyverse Expanded Universe". The Buffyverse novels, and Buffyverse comics are licensed by 20th Century Fox, but are generally considered 'less real' within the Buffyverse (apocryphal).[4] Expanded Universe material (e. ... // Introduction Buffyverse original novels fit into one of four categories. ... Cover to Buffy the vampire Slayer #58 and collected in Slayer Interrupted // Buffy comics. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... In the context of fiction Apocrypha includes those fictional stories that do not belong within a fictional univeres canon, yet still have some authority relating to that fictional universe. ...


Despite this, they have been licensed as official Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Angel merchandise. Furthermore, many authors have said that Whedon or his office have had to approve their overall outline for their novel or comic if not the final product. This was to prevent the stories venturing too far from the original intentions of Buffy/Angel stories (see below). These works are commonly considered non-canon. Jeff Mariotte, author of Buffyverse novels and comics has said: Jeff Mariotte is an author who currently lives in Arizona. ...

The rule in licensed fiction is that what's on the screen is canon, and the rest is not.[4]

However, commentators often refer to selected materials closely associated with Whedon as canon.[citation needed]


Works by Buffyverse cast or writers

Joss Whedon

Materials associated with Joss Whedon are typically described as canon by commentators,[citation needed] and by Whedon himself. For example he announced in 2005:

Darkhorse Comics are starting a new Buffy comic, and as I understand it, it will take place after the end of Buffy and Angel and be canon in the Buffy world. And I understand it that way 'cause I'm writing it![5]

In a separate interview, Whedon stated:

"We could make it officially what happened after the end of the show.[6]

Whedon has also written the comic mini-series Long Night's Journey, as well as short stories for Tales of the Slayers and Tales of the Vampires. Canonical warning: The followings canonical status in the Buffyverse is unclear: Long Nights Journey is a trade paperback collecting comic stories based on the Angel television series. ... Note: This is not to be confused with the Tales of the Slayer prose short story volumes. ... Tales of the Vampires was a miniseries of comic books (later collected in a single trade paperback) set in the Buffyverse. ...


Fray is an eight-part comic series written by Whedon, about a vampire slayer of the future named Melaka Fray. In the Buffyverse, a powerful scythe used by Buffy is found in centuries to come by Melaka Fray. In 2001, whilst Whedon was still producing Buffy he spoke about his concern of implications of information established by Fray (and Buffy comics generally) affecting the canon Buffyverse: Fray is an eight-issue comic book limited series about Melaka Fray, a Slayer in the future, written by Buffy the Vampire Slayer creator Joss Whedon and drawn by Karl Moline (pencils) and Andy Owens (inks). ... Fray is an eight-issue comic book limited series about Melaka Fray, a Slayer in the future, written by Buffy the Vampire Slayer creator Joss Whedon and drawn by Karl Moline (pencils) and Andy Owens (inks). ...

When it comes to Buffy, I do the show and that's it. Anything I do in a comic might interfere with the canon, or interfere with what I'm doing on the show. With Fray, I thought, okay, I'll do something new, that's in the Buffy universe so that I don't have to create a whole new universe for my first foray into comics. It can therefore be of interest to the fans, yet not interfere with anything.[7]

However, the Buffy series finale did not match continuity set by Fray. In Fray no mention is made of the Slayer's essence being split amongst multiple women.[8] When asked about the apparent contradictions between Buffy and Fray, Whedon responded: A Slayer, in the fictional Buffyverse established by Buffy and Angel, is a young female bestowed with mystical powers that originate from the heart of a pure-demon, which gives her superhuman senses, strength, speed, endurance, agility, and healing in the fight against forces of darkness. ...

No, that’s actually something I hope to deal with, either in the Spike format or in another series of Fray. There’s a discrepancy there that I plan to explain. I have a vision for it.[2]

In an interview with TV Guide, Whedon revealed that he considered TV tie-in comics to be "ancillary" unless written by the script-writers: Spike is a proposed movie based upon the character of Spike from Buffy & Angel. ...

"TVGuide.com: Have you seen the Battlestar Galactica comic?

Whedon: No, I don't think I can do it. I love Battlestar too hard. I couldn't look at any ancillary work.


TVGuide.com: I love Buffy "hard," so are you saying we fans shouldn't read the [Buffy the Vampire Slayer season eight (by Whedon)]? Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a series of comics based upon the television series of the same name, set to serve as a canonical season eight. ...


Whedon: No, because if they stopped doing Battlestar Galactica, and then two or three years later Ron Moore and David Eick said, "We ourselves are going to continue the story in comic-book form — as opposed to something ancillary to the show done by other people," then I would be all over it. That's not to say the Battlestar comic isn't great, but I love that show the way other people love Buffy. I love it unreasonably."[9] The Battlestar Galactica science fiction franchise, which began as a 1978 TV series, was reimagined in 2003 into the TV miniseries. ... Ronald Dowl Moore (born 1964 in Chowchilla, California) is an American screenwriter and television producer who is known for his work on Star Trek and the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica television series, which he created and runs. ... David Eick (born 1968) is a producer, best known as the producer of Battlestar Galactica. ...

Mutant Enemy

Several of the comics have been written by the scriptwriters of Mutant Enemy Productions. Doug Petrie wrote comics, Ring of Fire, Double Cross, and Bad Dog. Jane Espenson has written comics, (Haunted, Jonathan, and Reunion), as well as two Tales of the Slayer prose shorts ("Again, Sunnydale" and "Two Teenage Girls at the Mall"). Rebecca Rand Kirshner also wrote a prose short story for Tales of the Slayer, "The War Between the States". Mutant Enemy, Inc. ... Ring of Fire is a trade paperback collecting comic stories based on the Buffy television series. ... Cover Story by: Christopher Golden, Doug Petrie, Jamie S. Rich, Chynna Clugston-Major, Tom Fassbender, Jim Pascoe Penciller: Christian Zanier, Ryan Sook, Jason Minor, Chynna Clugston-Major, Cliff Richards Inker: Andy Owens, Joe Pimentel, Tim Goodyear, Curtis P. Arnold, Jason Minor, P. Craig Russell Letterer: Janice Chiang, Clem Robins, Pat... Cover Story by: Christopher Golden, Doug Petrie, Jamie S. Rich, Chynna Clugston-Major, Tom Fassbender, Jim Pascoe Penciller: Christian Zanier, Ryan Sook, Jason Minor, Chynna Clugston-Major, Cliff Richards Inker: Andy Owens, Joe Pimentel, Tim Goodyear, Curtis P. Arnold, Jason Minor, P. Craig Russell Letterer: Janice Chiang, Clem Robins, Pat... Cover Story by: Jane Espenson Penciller: Cliff Richards Inker: Julio Ferreira Letterer: Clem Robins Colorist: Jeromy Cox Comics: BtVS: Haunted #1-4 Published: Dark Horse Date first published: Sep 11, 2002 Substance: Soft cover, 96 pages, Full color // Story description Spoiler warning: General Synopsis Faith, tells Angel a story that... Cover // Information Story by: Jane Espenson Cover Artist: Tony Daniel Penciller: Cliff Richards Inker: Andy Owens Letterer: Clem Robins Colorist: Guy Major Comics: BtVS: Jonathon Published: Dark Horse Date first published: Jan 03, 2001 Substance: Full color, 32 pages. ... Note: This is not to be confused with Tales of the Slayers Graphic Novel. ... Note: This is not to be confused with Tales of the Slayers Graphic Novel. ... Note: This is not to be confused with Tales of the Slayers Graphic Novel. ... Note: This is not to be confused with Tales of the Slayers Graphic Novel. ...


Buffyverse cast

Two actors have co-authored comics with Christopher Golden. James Marsters who portrayed Spike, co-authored "Paint the Town Red", whilst Amber Benson co-authored Willow & Tara. Benson also wrote the comic short story "The Innocent". Christopher Golden is an American award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and the Body of Evidence series of teen thrillers. ... James Wesley Marsters (born August 20, 1962) is an American actor and musician, best known for playing the popular platinum-blond character Spike, an English of a vampire, in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spinoff series Angel. ... Spike (aka William The Bloody) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon for the cult television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. ... Note: Not to be confused with the novel: Spike and Dru: Pretty Maids All in a Row Cover Story by: James Marsters, Christopher Golden Artist: Keith Barnett Cover Artist: Ryan Sook Penciller: Eric Powell Inker: Drew Geraci Letterer: Pat Brosseau Colorist: Guy Major Comics: BtVS: Spike & Dr: Alls Fair... Amber Nicole Benson, born on January 8, 1977, is an American actress, writer, film director, and film producer. ... Cover Story by: Amber Benson, Christopher Golden Artist: Terry Moore, Andi Watson with Eric Powell Letterer: HiFi Design Colorist: HiFi Design Comics: BtVS: Willow & Tara: Wilderness #1-4, Wannablessedbe Published: Dark Horse Date first published: Apr 23, 2003 Substance: Soft cover, 80 pages, Full color // General Description Collected stories about... Note: This is not to be confused with the Tales of the Slayer prose short story volumes. ...


Works by other authors

All other Buffyverse comics and novels were written by authors that were not involved with any level of production of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Angel. The creators of these works are generally free to tell their own stories set in the Buffyverse,[citation needed] and may or may not keep to established continuity. Similarly, writers for the TV series were under no obligation to use continuity which has been established by the Expanded Universe,[citation needed] and sometimes contradicted it. Cover to Buffy the vampire Slayer #58 and collected in Slayer Interrupted // Buffy comics. ... Buffyverse novels include Buffy novels, Angel novels, Buffy/Angel novels and Tales of the Slayer. ...


Continuity problems

Usually the authors and editors of these licensed materials try not to contradict information that has been established by canon. However, many of the materials do directly contradict it. Jeff Mariotte has said:

Sometimes stuff shows up on screen that contradicts what you wrote, and sometimes the timing is such that a book comes out after the episode that contradicts it airs.[4]

For example, according to Monster Island, Spike and Gunn meet in the Hyperion Hotel in Angel Season 3;[10] however, the canonical Angel TV series later established that Spike and Gunn meet in the Wolfram and Hart L.A. offices in Angel Season 5.[11] Buffy and Angel feature on the cover // Book Information Author(s): Christopher Golden & Thomas E. Sniegoski Substance: 435 Pages Publisher: Pocket Books Date first published: March 2003 Book Description Spoiler warning: Doyles pureblood Brachen demon father Axtius is the General for the Coalition of Purity which believes that all... Charles Gunn (born 1978 in Los Angeles, California) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon and introduced by Garry Campbell for the cult television program, Angel. ...


Some of the licensed materials successfully avoid contradicting any information given in episodes. For example, How I Survived My Summer Vacation features short stories that take place after Buffy Season 1 but before Season 2. // Book Information Author(s): Michelle West, Nancy Holder, Cameron Dokey, and Paul Ruditis Substance: 288 pages Publisher: Pocket Books Date first published: (August 1, 2000) Book Description Spoiler warning: Dust by Michelle West Buffy continually sees the death of everyone she touches while she heads out to LA to spend...


Joss Whedon's involvement

A number of comments by Buffyverse writers have indicated that although they know they are not writing Buffyverse canon, overviews for their stories may still have been checked over by Whedon.


Referring to Whedon, Christopher Golden said:

He has to approve everything. I should say, his office has to approve everything, so sometimes he gets more involved than others in doing those approvals.[12]

In a separate interview, Golden said:

There are times in both books and comics when I know he has gotten involved because the word, sort of, comes down from him.[13]

Similarly, Peter David, was asked about his comic, Spike: Old Times, said: Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ...

Ostensibly comments came from Whedon, although for all I know, it was from an associate.[14]

Jeff Mariotte has revealed more detail of the approval process:

I come up with a proposal that's eight or ten pages long and I submit that to Pocket Books. They read it and if they like it then they submit it to 20th Century Fox and the Buffy office. If everybody approves it then I can get to work ... if I proposed doing something that was counter to what they wanted the direction of the character to be, they would tell me.[15]

Mariotte implies that little input is given, only acceptance or rejection of general ideas:

In the world of licensing there is a difference between 'approval' and 'input', and I'm not sure what the legal relationship between Fox and Mutant Enemy is. My impression is that Fox is doing everything in its power to make sure Joss is happy with what we do, and I know that Joss is looking at everything and making comments or thumbs-up, thumbs-down on stuff.[4]

When asked how much attention he pays to licensed works, Whedon said:

Not very much. I just don’t have time. I give them a few guidelines of things they should stay away from, things that we’re going to be dealing with or things that would disrupt the canon or things that are just antithetical to what I believe in.[2]

Elsewhere, Whedon has pointed out that he has never entirely read a single Buffy novel, and has little time to devote to such material. He therefore knows little of the final product, or of their quality control.


Sanction by Joss Whedon

In one instance, Whedon has endorsed a comic neither written nor supervised by him, The Origin by Christopher Golden and Dan Brereton, as canonical. An adaptation of the 1992 Buffy film which was reworked to fit the television series' continuity, Whedon said this of the comic: Cover // Information Story by: Christopher Golden, Dan Brereton Cover Artist: Dave Stewart Penciller: Joe Bennett Inker: Rick Ketcham, Randy Emberlin, J. Jadsen Letterer: Ken Bruzenar Colorist: Jeromy Cox, Guy Major Comics: BtVS: The Origin#1-3 Published: Dark Horse Date first published: Sep 15, 1999 Substance: Soft cover, 80 pages... Dan Brereton is an artist who has worked in the comic book field. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a 1992 comedy film about a Valley Girl cheerleader (Kristy Swanson) chosen by fate to fight and kill vampires. ...

The origin comic, though I have issues with it, CAN pretty much be accepted as canonical. They did a cool job of combining the movie script (the SCRIPT) with the series, that was nice, and using the series Merrick.[16]

Writer of Spike: Asylum and Spike: Shadow Puppets, Brian Lynch had no involvement in the production of the Buffy or Angel television series. However, charged by Joss Whedon with producing the canonical comic series Angel: After The Fall, Lynch's character Betta George has been chosen to be brought into the official canon.[17] Brian Lynch is an American writer, best known for writing and directing the movie Big Helium Dog. ...


Other Buffyverse productions

Excluding the Buffy and Angel television episodes, novels, and comics, there have been a variety of other official productions set within the Buffyverse. They are largely regarded as apocryphal, and some are contridicted by other canonical works.


Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992 film)

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the 1992 comedy film starring Kristy Swanson as Buffy, was written by Joss Whedon and directed by Fran Rubel Kuzui. In 2001, Whedon described his experience watching the film: Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a 1992 comedy film about a Valley Girl cheerleader (Kristy Swanson) chosen by fate to fight and kill vampires. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Renee Kristen Kristy Swanson (born Kristen Noel Swanson on December 19, 1969 in Mission Viejo, California, USA) is an American actress. ... Fran Rubel Kuzui is an American movie director and producer. ...

I finally sat down and had written it and somebody had made it into a movie, and I felt like -- well, that's not quite her. It's a start, but it's not quite the girl.[18]

The film contradicts continuity established by the Buffy television series; for example, the nature of vampires differs in significant ways: in the film, vampires do not have "bumpy" faces whilst feeding, and can fly. They also do not turn into dust when killed. As noted above, the canonicity of this film is superceded by The Origin. Cover // Information Story by: Christopher Golden, Dan Brereton Cover Artist: Dave Stewart Penciller: Joe Bennett Inker: Rick Ketcham, Randy Emberlin, J. Jadsen Letterer: Ken Bruzenar Colorist: Jeromy Cox, Guy Major Comics: BtVS: The Origin#1-3 Published: Dark Horse Date first published: Sep 15, 1999 Substance: Soft cover, 80 pages...


Television pilots

Whedon wrote and partly funded a 25-minute unaired Buffy pilot[19], but he was not happy with the final product (he has been quoted in an interview about the pilot, "It sucks on ass"[20]). The continuity is completely superseded by a similar story told in the first Buffy episode, "Welcome to the Hellmouth". List of Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes Known to fans as the unaired Buffy pilot, this thirty-minute production by Joss Whedon was never intended to air. ... Welcome to the Hellmouth (Welcome for short) is the very first episode of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


The unaired Angel pitch tape was produced prior to the series. It features Angel speaking toward the camera (possibly breaking the Fourth wall). Canonical warning: The followings canonical status in the Buffyverse is unclear: A six-minute pitch tape produced by Joss Whedon was never intended to air, but used in 1999 to show the WB Network the potential of Angel. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Screen tests

Two Buffyverse screen tests have been widely released, both of which are found on the Angel Season 3 DVD set (disc six): Amy Acker's screen test for the role of Winifred Burkle, and Vincent Kartheiser's test for the role of Connor. These are associated with Angel cast and crew. Acker's test involves a scene with the characters, Fred, Wesley and Gunn. Fred tries and fails to alert Wesley to an imminent danger but Wesley (and later Gunn) are struck by a love spell which causes them to profess their love for her. Kartheiser's test involves the characters Connor, and Angel. Connor wishes to leave the Hyperion, but his father, Angel, attempts to stop him. Screen Test was a British childrens quiz show produced by the BBC which ran from 1969 to 1984. ... The complete Angel Series 1-5 UK boxset DVDs of the television show Angel were produced by 20th Century Fox and released beginning in 2001. ... Amy Acker at the Serenity premiere, 2005 Amy Louise Acker (born December 5, 1976) is an American actress. ... Winifred Fred Burkle is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon and introduced by Shawn Ryan for the cult television series, Angel. ... Vincent Paul Kartheiser (born May 5, 1979) is an American actor. ... Connor, also known as Gay butterfly Angel, Steven Franklin Thomas Fart and Connor Ratface, is a fictional character created by I like man for the television series Angel. ...


Promos

Some promotional material aired on WB and UPN featured Buffyverse actors portraying their characters in original material. For example, Sarah Michelle Gellar appeared as Buffy for 1-800-COLLECT adverts. Similarly Nicholas Brendon played Xander in Barq's commercials. Some Buffy Season 6 UPN promos consisted of the Scooby Gang talking about Buffy. Whedon's degree of involvement in the making of such promotional clips is not publicly known. Buffy and Angel promos were used by the WB Network and later by UPN to promote episodes of Buffy & Angel. ... WB or Wb or wb may stand for: Internet chat slang for welcome back Wachovia Corporation, stock symbol Warner Bros. ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ... Sarah Michelle Gellar (born April 14, 1977) is a Golden Globe-nominated, Daytime Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... MCI, Inc. ... Nicholas Brendon (born April 12, 1971 as Nicholas Brendon Schultz in Los Angeles, California), is an actor best known for his character Xander Harris in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003). ... Barqs is an American soft drink company. ... The Scooby Gang, or Scoobies, are Buffy Summers and her friends and colleagues who assist her in her duties as the Slayer in the cult television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


Video games

The Buffy the Vampire Slayer video games do not contradict continuity established by the series. Furthermore, many of the actors from the shows have provided their voices for the games. Joss Whedon was involved in Chaos Bleeds, and appears in the game's special features. The cover of the Buffy video game, Chaos Bleeds Five official video game adaptations of the cult television program Buffy the Vampire Slayer have been released. ...


Undeveloped productions

Mutant Enemy Productions have at various times gone into the early stages of development with potential Buffyverse spinoffs that were ultimately unproduced. Faith the Vampire Slayer, Ripper, Slayer School, and the Spike movie would have taken place within the same fictional continuity.[citation needed] Buffy the Animated Series may have followed a slightly alternative continuity since promotional artwork has shown that the Sunnydale High library would have looked dramatically different than it had in the Buffy episodes.[21] Mutant Enemy, Inc. ... The fictional Buffyverse established by TV series, Buffy and Angel, has had a strong cultural impact and a loyal fan base, and the creator Joss Whedon has been widely recognised as a talent within the entertainment industry. ... The fictional Buffyverse established by TV series, Buffy and Angel, has had a strong cultural impact and a loyal fan base, and the creator Joss Whedon has been widely recognised as a talent within the entertainment industry. ... The fictional Buffyverse established by TV series, Buffy and Angel, has had a strong cultural impact and a loyal fan base, and the creator Joss Whedon has been widely recognised as a talent within the entertainment industry. ... Spike is a proposed movie based upon the character of Spike from Buffy & Angel. ... Canonical warning: The followings canonical status in the Buffyverse is unclear: Buffy the Animated Series was an undeveloped animated TV show based on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


The David Fury-written script, "Corrupt", establishes an alternative continuity after the premiere Angel episode, "City of". Events that take place in the story are instead superseded by the continuity of the second Angel episode, "Lonely Hearts", the episode which was written to replace "Corrupt". City of is the series premiere of the television show Angel. ... Lonely Hearts is the 2nd episode of season 1 of the television show Angel. ...


Unofficial works

The following works are not licensed by 20th Century Fox as Buffy/Angel merchandise, and do not have any involvement from any Buffyverse cast and crew: Buffy and Angel (Buffyverse) cast and crew were involved in the making of the television series. ...

  • Forged in Flames - Published fictional novel by Gillian Silverlight.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a culturally influential American television series based upon the 1992 film of the same name. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a culturally influential American television series based upon the 1992 film of the same name. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a culturally influential American television series based upon the 1992 film of the same name. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a culturally influential American television series based upon the 1992 film of the same name. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a culturally influential American television series based upon the 1992 film of the same name. ...

Official Canon

Official Canon consits of:

  • Tales of The Slayers (Graphic Novel)
  • Tales of The Vampires (Mini-Series)
  • The Origin (Mini-Series)
  • Buffy The Vampire Slayer (Television Series)
  • Tales of The Slayers (One-Shot)
  • Angel (Television Series)
  • Buffy The Vampire Slayer Series Eight (Comic)
  • Angel: After The Fall (Comic)
  • Fray (Mini-Series)

Note: The Origin Mini-Series is a re-write of the original 1992 movie. Whedon has placed it into offical canon. Tales of The Slayers (One-Shot) happens during series two of Buffy The Vampire Slayer.


External links

Examples of fandom commentary on Buffyverse canonicity
  • Buffy Canon vs. Fanon
  • Whedonesque.com - A long debate over what is or is not 'canon'

References

  1. ^ See Star Trek canon , Star Wars canon. These canons have been more clearly defined than the Buffyverse canon.
  2. ^ a b c Faraci, Devin, Exclusive Interview: Joss Whedon, CHUD.com (September 22, 2005)
  3. ^ Brady, Matt, "Joss Whedon talks Angel, After the Fall", Newsarama.com (April 26, 2007).
  4. ^ a b c d e Naso, Markisan, Jeff Mariotte: Cursed, Silver Bullet Comic Books (2005)
  5. ^ Whedon, Joss "Joss to never learn how to work site!". Whedonesque.com (November 09 2005)
  6. ^ Rudolph, Ileane,"Buffy the Vampire Slayer Is Back: The Complete Joss Whedon Q&A". TV Guide (December 7, 2006)
  7. ^ Nazzaro, Joe, "Interview with Joss Whedon", Starburst #48 (June 2001). Cited from fanficcafe.
  8. ^ Whedon, Joss, "Chosen", Buffy TV episode (2003)
  9. ^ Rudolph, Ileane,"Buffy the Vampire Slayer Is Back: The Complete Joss Whedon Q&A". TV Guide (December 7, 2006)
  10. ^ Golden, Christopher & Sniegoski, Thomas E., Monster Island, Pocket Books, (March 2003)
  11. ^ Whedon, Joss, "Conviction" Angel TV series (2003).
  12. ^ Bratton, Kristy, "Behind the Scenes with Christopher Golden", Cityofangel.com (2000).
  13. ^ Bratton, Kristy, "Dragon*Con 2000", Cityofangel.com (2000).
  14. ^ David, Peter, "Spike Comic", Peterdavid.malibulist.com (March 12, 2005).
  15. ^ Barrera, Rachel, "City of Angel - Jeff Mariotte: Armed with Pen and Stake", Cityofangel.com (2000).
  16. ^ Hsiao, James T. (archiver), "Bronze VIP Archive" The Bronze (January 17, 1999).
  17. ^ Lynch, Brian (2007-07-27), Comments on 13845: (SPOILER) First smidgen of info from IDW's 'Angel:After the Fall' panel at Comic-Con.. Retrieved on 2007-07-31
  18. ^ Ervin-Gore, Shawna, "Dark Horse; Joss Whedon" darkhorse.com (2001).
  19. ^ Topping, Keith "Slayer". Virgin Publishing, (December 1, 2004), p7
  20. ^ Ken, P., "An Interview with Joss Whedon", filmforce.ign.com, page 10 (June 23, 2003).
  21. ^ Wight, Eric, "Sunnydale High School Library: Visual Development", Ericwight.com (2003).

All links active as of November 2006 The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. ... The Star Wars canon consists of the six Star Wars feature films, along with all officially licensed, non-contradicting spin-off works to the six films. ... Starburst is a British science fiction magazine published every four weeks by Visual Imagination. ... Chosen, the series finale of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, is Episode 22 of Season 7. ... Buffy and Angel feature on the cover // Book Information Author(s): Christopher Golden & Thomas E. Sniegoski Substance: 435 Pages Publisher: Pocket Books Date first published: March 2003 Book Description Spoiler warning: Doyles pureblood Brachen demon father Axtius is the General for the Coalition of Purity which believes that all... Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of the Buffy guide, Watchers Guide Vol. ... Virgin Books is the book publishing arm of Virgin Enterprises, the company originally set up by Richard Branson as a record company. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN is a multimedia news and reviews website that focuses heavily on video games. ...


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