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Encyclopedia > Buddy Holly
Buddy Holly
Buddy Holly in concert
Buddy Holly in concert
Background information
Birth name Charles Hardin Holley
Born September 7, 1936(1936-09-07),
Lubbock, Texas U.S.
Died February 3, 1959 (aged 22),
Clear Lake, Iowa, U.S.
Genre(s) Rock and roll , Rockabilly
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, Guitarist
Instrument(s) Vocals, Guitar
Years active 1954 – 1959
Label(s) Decca
Associated acts The Crickets
Website BuddyHolly.com
Notable instrument(s)
Fender Stratocaster
Fender Telecaster

Charles Hardin "Buddy" Holley (September 7, 1936February 3, 1959)[1] was an American singer-songwriter and a pioneer of rock and roll. The change of spelling of "Holley" to "Holly" came about because of an error in a contract he was asked to sign, listing him as Buddy Holly.[1] That spelling was then adopted for his professional career. Buddy Holly is a popular single by Weezer, written by Rivers Cuomo. ... Image File history File links Buddy_Holly. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Lubbock” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Clear Lake (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... The Crickets The Crickets were the backing band from Texas in the United States, formed by singer/songwriter Buddy Holly in the 1950s. ... Stratocaster redirects here. ... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Although his success lasted only a year and a half before his death in an airplane crash, Holly is described by critic Bruce Eder as "the single most influential creative force in early rock and roll."[2] His works and innovations were copied by his contemporaries and later musicians, notably The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, and exerted a profound influence on popular music. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Holly #13 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[3] Monument at Crash Site, September 16, 2003. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...

Contents

Biography

Charles Hardin Holley was born in Lubbock, Texas[1] to Lawrence Odell Holley and Ella Pauline Drake in 1936. The Holleys were a musical family and as a young boy Holley learned to play piano, guitar, fiddle and the violin (his brothers oiled the strings so much that no one could hear him play). In the fall of 1949, he met Bob Montgomery in Hutchinson Junior High School. They shared a common interest in music and soon teamed up as the duo "Buddy and Bob." Initially influenced by bluegrass music, they sang harmony duets at local clubs and high school talent shows. His musical interests grew throughout high school while singing in the Lubbock High School Choir.[4] “Lubbock” redirects here. ... Bob Montgomery, born May 12, 1937 in Lampasas, Texas is an American singer, songwriter, and music producer/publisher. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ...


Holly turned to rock music after seeing Elvis Presley sing live in Lubbock in early 1955. A few months later, he appeared on the same bill with Presley, also in Lubbock. Holly's transition to rock was finalized when he opened for Bill Haley & His Comets at a local rock show organized by Eddie Crandall, who was also the manager for Marty Robbins. As a result of this performance, Holly was offered a contract with Decca Records to work alone, which he accepted. According to the Amburn book (p. 45), his public name changed from "Holley" to "Holly" on February 8, 1956, when he signed the Decca contract. Among the tracks recorded for Decca was an early version of "That'll Be The Day", which took its title from a phrase that John Wayne's character said repeatedly in the 1956 film, The Searchers.[5] Elvis redirects here. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Marty Robbins (September 26, 1925 – December 8, 1982) was one of the most popular and successful American country and western singers of his era. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thatll Be The Day by Buddy Holly and The Crickets is credited as being written by Jerry Allison the drummer with the group; Holly (the lead guitarist and vocalist); and Norman Petty the records producer. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... The Searchers is a 1956 epic Western film directed by John Ford, which tells the story of Ethan Edwards, a bitter, middle-aged loner and Civil War veteran played by John Wayne, who spends years looking for his abducted niece. ...

"The Crickets": Buddy Holly, Joe B. Mauldin, Jerry Allison, and Niki Sullivan

Back in Lubbock, Holly formed his own band, The Crickets and began making records at Norman Petty's studios in Clovis, New Mexico. Norman had music industry contacts and believing that "That'll Be the Day" would be a hit single, he contacted publishers and labels. Coral Records, a subsidiary of Decca, signed Buddy Holly and The Crickets. This put Holly in the unusual position of having two record contracts at the same time. Before "That'll Be The Day" had its nationwide release, Holly played lead guitar on the hit-single "Starlight", recorded in April, 1957, featuring Jack Huddle. The initial, unsuccessful version of "That'll Be The Day" played more slowly and about half an octave higher than the hit version. Image File history File links BUDDY_HOLLY_CRICKETS.jpg‎ Summary Album cover for Buddy Holly article. ... Image File history File links BUDDY_HOLLY_CRICKETS.jpg‎ Summary Album cover for Buddy Holly article. ... Joe. ... Jerry Allison (born 1939) is best known for being the drummer for the Crickets. ... Niki Sullivan was born on 23 June 1937, in South Gate, California. ... The Crickets The Crickets were the backing band from Texas in the United States, formed by singer/songwriter Buddy Holly in the 1950s. ... Norman Petty (May 25, 1927 - August 15, 1984) was an American musician, songwriter, and pioneer record producer who helped shape modern pop music. ... Clovis may refer to the following: The personal name of Germanic origin that primarily saw use in Europe before the year 1000 AD. Several locales and persons of historical importance have borne this name. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... Coral Records was a Decca Records subsidiary based in the United States of America. ... Jack Huddle in the early 1950s Jack Huddle (1928 - 1973) was an American rockabilly musician and songwriter. ...


Holly managed to bridge some of the racial divide that marked rock n' roll music. While Elvis made black music more acceptable to whites, Holly won over an all-black audience when the Crickets were accidentally booked at New York's Apollo Theater (though, unlike the immediate response depicted in the 1978 movie The Buddy Holly Story, it actually took several performances for his talents to be appreciated). Apollo Theater marquee, c. ... The Buddy Holly Story is a 1978 biographical film which tells the life story of rock musician Buddy Holly. ...


After the release of several highly successful songs, Holly and the Crickets toured the United Kingdom in 1958.[6]


That same year, he met Maria Elena Santiago (born 1935 in San Juan, Puerto Rico) while she was working as a receptionist for Peer-Southern Music, a New York music publisher. He proposed to her on their very first date. She initially thought he was kidding, but they were married in Lubbock, Texas on August 15, 1958, less than two months after they met. Maria traveled on some of the tours, doing everything from the laundry to equipment set-up to ensuring the group got paid. For other uses, see San Juan. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Jan. ...


The ambitious Holly became increasingly interested in the New York music/recording/publishing scene, while his easygoing bandmates wanted to go back home to Lubbock. As a result, in 1959, the group split.


Death

Holly's headstone in the City of Lubbock Cemetery
Holly's headstone in the City of Lubbock Cemetery

Holly began a solo tour with other notable performers, including Dion DiMucci, Ritchie Valens, and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson. One night after a performance in Green Bay, Wisconsin at the Riverside Ballroom, the three headliners gave a show at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa on February 2, 1959. Afterwards, Buddy Holly chartered a Beechcraft Bonanza to take him and his new back-up band (Tommy Allsup and Waylon Jennings) to Fargo, North Dakota, enroute to play the next leg of the Winter Dance Party tour at the Armory in Moorhead, Minnesota. Carl Bunch missed the flight as he had been hospitalized with frostbite three days earlier.[7] The Big Bopper asked Jennings for his spot on the four-seat plane, as he was recovering from the flu. Ritchie Valens was still signing autographs at the concert site when Allsup walked in and told him it was time to go. Allsup pulled a 50 cent coin out of his pocket and the two men flipped for the seat. Allsup lost. Monument at Crash Site, September 16, 2003. ... Dion DiMucci (born Dion Francis DiMucci, 18 July 1939), better known as Dion, is an American singer-songwriter, now widely recognized as one of the top singers of his era, blending the best elements of doo-wop, pop, and R&B styles. ... Ritchie Valens (born Ricardo Steven Valenzuela, May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959) was a pioneer of rock and roll and a forefather to the Latin Rock movement. ... Jiles Perry (J.P.) Richardson, Jr. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... The Surf Ballroom is located in Clear Lake, Iowa. ... Clear Lake is a city located in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fork Tailed Doctor Killer. ... Tommy Allsup was the person who luckily lost the toss to Ritchie Valens for a place on Buddy Hollys aeroplane, on The Day the Music Died in 1959. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... “Fargo” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Moorhead is a city in Clay County, Minnesota, United States, and the largest city in northwest Minnesota. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... This article is about a medical condition. ... Ritchie Valens (born Ricardo Steven Valenzuela, May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959) was a pioneer of rock and roll and a forefather to the Latin Rock movement. ...


The plane took off in light snow and gusty winds at around 12:55 A.M., but crashed after only a few minutes. The wreckage was discovered several hours later by the plane's owner, Jerry Dwyer, some 8 miles (13 km) from the airport on the property of Albert Juhl. The crash killed Holly, Valens, Richardson, and the 21-year-old pilot, Roger Peterson. Holly's body, along with those of Valens and Richardson, was thrown from the wreckage. Holly and Valens lay 17 feet (5.2 m) south of the wreckage and Richardson was thrown around 40 feet (12 m) to the north of the wreckage. The pilot's body remained in the wreckage. All had suffered severe and multiple injuries. Without any doubt, all had died on impact, with the plane hitting the ground at 170 mph (270 km/h). While theories abound as to the exact cause of the crash, an official determination of pilot error was rendered by the Civil Aeronautics Board. Although the crash received a good deal of local coverage, it was displaced in the national news by an accident that occurred the same day in New York City, when American Airlines Flight 320 crashed during an instrument landing approach at LaGuardia Airport, killing 65. Don McLean referred to it as "The Day the Music Died". Roger Arthur Peterson (May 24, 1937 - February 3, 1959) was pilot of the ill-fated plane in which crash claimed the lives of Rock and Roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. The Big Bopper Richardson. ... Pilot error is a term used to describe the cause of a crash of an airworthy aircraft where the pilot is considered to be principally or partially responsible. ... Governments have played an important part in shaping air transportation. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... American Airlines Flight 320 was a Lockheed L-188 Electra traveling from Chicago to New York City. ... LaGuardia Airport (IATA: LGA, ICAO: KLGA, FAA LID: LGA) (pronounced La-Gwardia) is an airport serving New York City, New York, United States, located on the waterfront of Flushing Bay, and borders the neighborhoods of Astoria, Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst in the borough of Queens. ... For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ...


Holly's pregnant wife became a widow after barely six months of marriage and miscarried soon after. Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or spontaneous end of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ...


Holly's funeral services were held at 2:00 p.m., Saturday, February 7, 1959 at the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Lubbock under the direction of Sanders Funeral Home.[8] His body was interred in the City of Lubbock Cemetery in the eastern part of the city. Holly's headstone carries the correct spelling of his surname (Holley) and a carving of his Fender Stratocaster guitar. is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stratocaster redirects here. ...


Posthumous record releases

Buddy Holly's music did not die with him. He had recorded so prolifically that his record label was able to release brand-new Buddy Holly albums and singles for 10 years after his death. Holly's simple demonstration recordings were overdubbed by studio musicians, to bring them up to then-commercial standards. The best of these records is often considered to be the first posthumous single, the 1959 coupling of "Peggy Sue Got Married" and "Crying, Waiting, Hoping", produced by Jack Hansen, with added backing vocals by the Ray Charles Singers in simulation of an authentic Crickets record. "Crying, Waiting, Hoping" was actually supposed to be the "A" side of the 45, with the backup group effectively echoing Buddy's call-and-response vocal. The Hansen session, in which Holly's last six original compositions were overdubbed, was issued on the 1960 Coral LP The Buddy Holly Story, Vol. 2. Peggy Sue Got Married is a song by Buddy Holly. ... Crying, Waiting, Hoping is a song by Buddy Holly. ... An album by Buddy Holly, the second part to The Buddy Holly Story (1959). ...


Buddy Holly continued to be promoted and sold as an “active” artist, and his records had a loyal following, especially in Europe. The demand for unissued Holly material was so great that Norman Petty resorted to overdubbing whatever he could find: alternate takes of studio recordings, originally rejected masters, “Crying, Waiting, Hoping” and the other five 1959 tracks (adding new surf-guitar arrangements), and even Holly's amateur demos from 1954 (where the low-fidelity vocals are often muffled behind the new orchestrations). The last new Buddy Holly album was Giant (featuring the single, “Love Is Strange”), issued in 1969. Between the 1959-60 Jack Hansen overdubs, the 1960s Norman Petty overdubs, various alternate takes, and Holly's undubbed originals, collectors can often choose from multiple versions of the same song. Love Is Strange was a 1957 Top 40 hit for Mickey & Sylvia. ...


Style

Holly's music was sophisticated for its day, including the use of instruments considered novel for rock and roll, such as the celesta (heard on "Everyday"). Holly was an influential lead and rhythm guitarist, notably on songs such as "Peggy Sue" and "Not Fade Away". While Holly could pump out boy-loves-girl songs with the best of his contemporaries, other songs featured more sophisticated lyrics and more complex harmonies and melodies than had previously appeared in the genre. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... French type, four-octave Celesta The Celesta (IPA ) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... Peggy Sue is a rock and roll song written by Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, and Norman Petty, and originally performed, recorded and released as a single by Buddy Holly and the Crickets in early July of 1957. ... Not Fade Away is a song written by Buddy Holly and Norman Petty and performed by Holly; the songs rhythm pattern is one of the classic examples of the Bo Diddley beat. ...


Many of his songs feature a unique vocal "hiccup" technique, a glottal stop, to emphasize certain words in any given song, especially the rockers.[1] Other singers (such as Elvis) have used a similar technique, though less obviously and consistently. Examples of this can be found at the start of the raucous "Rave On": "Weh-eh-ell, the little things you say and do, make me want to be with you-ou..."; in "That'll Be the Day": "Well, you give me all your lovin' and your -turtle dovin'..."; and in "Peggy Sue": "I love you Peggy Sue - with a love so rare and tr-ue ..." This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Influence

Contrary to popular belief, teenagers John Lennon and Paul McCartney did not attend a Holly concert; Tony Bramwell, a school friend of McCartney and George Harrison, did. Bramwell met Holly, and freely shared his records with all three. Lennon and McCartney later cited Holly as a primary influence.[9] (Their band's name, The Beatles, was chosen partly in homage to Holly's Crickets.) The Beatles did a cover version of "Words of Love" that was a close reproduction of Holly's version. Fan McCartney owns the publishing rights to Holly's song catalogue.[10] John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... This article deals with contemporary popular music publishing. ...


A young Bob Dylan attended the January 31, 1959 show, two nights before Holly's death. Dylan referred to this in his 1998 Grammy acceptance speech for his 1997 Time out of Mind winning Album of the Year: This article is about the recording artist. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time Out of Mind is Bob Dylans critically-acclaimed comeback album, released in 1997. ...

"And I just want to say that when I was sixteen or seventeen years old, I went to see Buddy Holly play at Duluth National Guard Armory and I was three feet away from him...and he LOOKED at me. And I just have some sort of feeling that he was — I don't know how or why — but I know he was with us all the time we were making this record in some kind of way."[11]

Various rock and roll histories have asserted that the singing group The Hollies were named in homage to Buddy Holly. According to the band's website,[12] although the group admired Holly (and years later produced an album covering some of his songs), their name was inspired primarily by the sprigs of holly in evidence around Christmas of 1962. However, the site also admits to a degree of uncertainty about that story. ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... This article is about the plant. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Tributes

Songs

Don McLean's popular 1971 ballad "American Pie" is inspired by the "The Day the Music Died" (the day of the plane crash). He has also covered "Everyday." For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ... For other uses, see Ballad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see American Pie (disambiguation). ... Monument at Crash Site, September 16, 2003. ...


Eddie Cochran, good friend and fellow rock 'n' roll pioneer was so distraught by the deaths of Holly, Valens and The Big Bopper that he recorded the song "Three Stars" as a tribute. Ironically, the song was not released until after Cochran's own premature death. Raymond Edward Eddie Cochran (October 2, 1938[1]–April 17, 1960[2]) was an American rock and roll musician and an important influence on popular music during the late 1950s, early 1960s, and beyond. ...


A 1980 Gyllene Tider song is called "Ska vi älska, så ska vi älska till Buddy Holly". ("If We'll Make Love, We'll Make Love (listening) to Buddy Holly"). Gyllene Tider in 2004 Gyllene Tider is a Swedish pop group. ...


The Smithereens' song "Maria Elena" is a Buddy Holly tribute as sung to his widow. The Smithereens are a rock band from Carteret, New Jersey. ...


Blink 182 has a song named "Peggy Sue" which is a tribute to Holly. Blink-182 was an American trio that played pop punk[1][2][3] and punk rock[4][5] music. ...


Phil Ochs famously sang a long tribute to Buddy Holly on the infamous Gunfight at Carnegie Hall album. Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940–April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Gunfight At Carnegie Hall was Phil Ochs final album, presumably comprised of songs recorded at his infamous second show at Carnegie Hall on March 27, 1970, containing less than half of the actual concert. ...


Mike Berry released a 1961 single called "Tribute to Buddy Holly". It was written by Geoff Goddard and produced by Joe Meek, who was a great Buddy Holly fan. In the USA, it was released on Coral, Buddy Holly's label.[13] Mike Berry (born Michael Bourne, on September 24, 1942) is an English actor and singer best known for his appearances as Mr Spooner on Are You Being Served?. Berry was born in Northampton. ... Tribute to Buddy Holly is a 1961 hit-single by Mike Berry. ... Geoff Goddard (born 19. ... For Joe Meek the mountain man, see Joseph Meek Joe Meek (born Robert George Meek; April 5, 1929 in Newent, Gloucestershire — February 3, 1967 in London[1]) was a pioneering English record producer and songwriter acknowledged as one of the worlds first and most imaginative independent producers. ...


Weezer's self-titled debut album features the band's popular single "Buddy Holly". For the albums, see Weezer (1994 album) and Weezer (2001 album). ... Alternate cover Cover of 2004 double-CD deluxe edition Weezer, often referred to as The Blue Album, is the debut album by the alternative rock band Weezer. ... Buddy Holly is a popular single by Weezer, written by Rivers Cuomo. ...


The Dixie Chicks mentioned him in "Lubbock or Leave It" on Taking The Long Way - "International airport / A quarter after nine / Paris, Texas, Athens, Georgia's not what I had in mind / As I'm getting out I laugh to myself / 'cause this is the only place / Where as you're getting on the plane you see Buddy Holly's face / I hear they hate me now just like they hated you / Maybe when I'm dead and gone, I'm gonna get a statue too." The Dixie Chicks are a multiple Grammy-award winning alternative country band and are the highest-selling female band in any musical genre, having sold over 36 million albums as of March 2008. ...


In 1985 the German rock band Die Ärzte sang a song named "Buddy Hollys Brille" (Buddy Holly's glasses), in which they discussed in a humorous way the question of what happened to Buddy Holly's glasses after his death. Die Ärzte (also spelled die ärzte; German for the physicians or the doctors) are a German rock/punk rock band from Berlin. ...


Mac Davis' "Texas In My Rearview Mirror" also references Buddy Holly, with these lines:

Humming an old Buddy Holly tune called "Peggy Sue"
With my favorite jeans
And a cheap guitar
I ran off chasing a distant star
If Buddy Holly could make it that far
I figured I could too

"Sleep Walk" is an instrumental steel guitar-based song recorded and released in 1959 by Santo & Johnny. It was recorded at Trinity Music in Manhattan. "Sleep Walk" entered Billboard's 'Top 40' on August 17, 1959. It rose to the No. 1 position for two weeks in September (the 21st and the 28th) and remained in the Top 40 list until November 9. It is also recognized as a tribute to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper.[citation needed] is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Musician Albert Hammond, Jr. has a cover of "Well... Alright" on his 2007 album Yours To Keep. Albert Hammond, Jr. ... This article is about Albert Hammond, Jr. ...


Monuments

Fan monument in a private cornfield at the site of the airplane crash, near Clear Lake, Iowa
Fan monument in a private cornfield at the site of the airplane crash, near Clear Lake, Iowa

Downtown Lubbock has a "walk of fame" with plaques to various area artists such as Glenna Goodacre, Mac Davis, Maines Brothers Band, and Waylon Jennings, with a life-size statue of Buddy by sculptor Grant Speed (1980), playing his Fender guitar, as its centerpiece. Downtown Lubbock also features Buddy Holly Avenue and the Buddy Holly Center, which is a museum dedicated to Texas art and music. ImageMetadata File history File links HollyMonument. ... ImageMetadata File history File links HollyMonument. ... Glenna Goodacre is an artist best known for having designed the Sacagawea Dollar that entered circulation in the United States in 2000. ... Mac Davis (born Scott Davis, January 21, 1942, in Lubbock, Texas) is a country music singer and songwriter, who has enjoyed much pop music crossover success. ... The Maines Brothers Band is a Texas-based country music band. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ...


In 1988, Ken Paquette, a Wisconsin fan of the 1950s, erected a stainless steel monument at the site of the airplane crash, depicting a steel guitar and a set of three records bearing the names of each of the three performers.[14] It is located on private farmland approximately five miles north of Clear Lake. He also created a similar stainless steel monument to the three musicians at the Riverside Ballroom in Green Bay, Wisconsin. That memorial was unveiled on July 17, 2003.[15] Clear Lake is a city located in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. ... Green Bay is the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other

The Surf Ballroom hosts an annual tribute on the anniversary of Holly's last performances. The 'Winter Dance Party Tour' is a tribute tour to Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, the Big Bopper and early rock and roll. It gets its name from the tour that ended the lives of Holly, Valens, and Richardson. This reproduction of the tour ends every year at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa. The Surf Ballroom is located in Clear Lake, Iowa. ...


Buddy Holly in popular culture

Film and musical depictions

  • There were also successful Broadway and West End musicals documenting his career. Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story ran in the West End for 13 years.[1] This was followed by a tour and return to the West End on the 3rd August 2007.
  • Holly, The Crickets and The Big Bopper are also depicted in a touring tribute act, Buddy Holly and The Cricketers[16]. They recently appeared on BBC1's The One and Only[17].
  • In the 1994 film Pulp Fiction, a scene depicts John Travolta and Uma Thurman's characters dining at a fictional 1950's themed restaurant named Jack Rabbit Slims. The waiter in the movie is dressed as Buddy Holly. He is played by Steve Buscemi.
  • The 1998 film Six-String Samurai, a surreal romp through an alternate-timeline post-apocalyptic America (Russia bombed and then invaded the United States in 1957), features a rock-and-rolling martial arts hero named "Buddy" who sports familiar black horn-rimmed glasses and a tuxedo. The film follows Buddy's journey to "Lost Vegas", the last outpost of freedom in the world, to claim the crown of the recently-deceased King Elvis.
  • He is portrayed by Frankie Muniz in the 2007 film Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story.
  • A fictional and comedic take on his final moments will appear in the 2009 film Lives and Deaths of the Poets, Holly will be portrayed by Gordon Gantt.
  • Holly will be depicted in a 2009 movie, The Day the Music Died. The film is set to be released on February 3, 2009, the 50th anniversary of the crash that claimed the lives of Holly, Valens, and Richardson.[18]
  • A short clip of Buddy Holly can be seen in the backround of the beginning of the guitar solo in the music video for "Majesty of Rock, The" by Spinal Tap.

Poster for Man on the Moon (1999), a biopic A biographical picture— often shortened to biopic— is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people. ... The Buddy Holly Story is a 1978 biographical film which tells the life story of rock musician Buddy Holly. ... William Gareth Jacob Busey Sr. ... Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel-string guitar playing and close harmony... Sonny Curtis (born May 9, 1937, in Meadow, Texas) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Jerry Allison (born 1939) is best known for being the drummer for the Crickets. ... Marshall Crenshaw (born 11 November 1953) is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... La Bamba is an American biographical film released in 1987 written and directed by Luis Valdez. ... Ritchie Valens (born Ricardo Steven Valenzuela, May 13, 1941 – February 3, 1959) was a pioneer of rock and roll and a forefather to the Latin Rock movement. ... Jiles Perry Richardson, Jr. ... Crying, Waiting, Hoping is a song by Buddy Holly. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Buddy – The Buddy Holly Story is the popular long-running musical, which opened in Londons West End (at the Victoria Palace Theatre) in 1989. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Six-String Samurai is a 1998 post-apocalyptic action/comedy film directed by Lance Mungia. ... Francisco James Muniz IV (born December 5, 1985), better known as Frankie Muniz, is an Emmy Award- and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Books

The science fiction novel Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede, by Bradley Denton (ISBN 0-688-10822-9 and ISBN 0-380-71876-6), begins when television sets throughout the world suddenly begin broadcasting a concert by an apparently living Buddy Holly, who says he is on Ganymede. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Bradley Clayton Denton (born 1958, Towanda, Kansas) is an award-winning American science fiction author. ... This article is about the natural satellite of Jupiter. ...


In Soul Music, part of Terry Pratchett's Discworld, a character by the name of Imp y Celyn appeared as a bard-cum-guitar-playing-rocker from the fictional Cymric country of Llamedos. He became the Disc's greatest musician under the name Buddy in the Band with Rocks In, before dying in a cart crash (a reference to Buddy Holly as Imp's name translates as "bud of the holly"). For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... This article is about the novels. ... This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... For alternate meanings, see Wales (disambiguation) National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Official languages: English and Welsh Capital: Cardiff First Minister: Rhodri Morgan AM Area  - Total:  - % water: Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² xx% Population  - Total (2001):  - Density: Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... Llamedos is a fictitious country in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, mentioned most prominently in Soul Music. ...


Television

"Oil", an episode of The Young Ones features Mike (Christopher Ryan) discovering Buddy Holly, alive and well and tangled in parachutes, in the attic of a house in London. The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... Christopher Ryan is an English actor who trained at East 15 Acting School in London. ...


A fictional version of a young pre-fame Buddy Holly is a main character in an episode of Quantum Leap, working as a veterinarian's assistant.[19] Quantum Leap is an American science fiction television series that ran for 96 episodes from March 1989 to May 1993 on the NBC network. ...


Nirvava's music video for "In Bloom" has Kurt Cobain as Buddy Holly and the other members as The Crickets. Nevermind track listing For the upcoming film, see In Bloom (film). ...


In the Simpsons episode "Colonel Homer", the manager of the recording studio fondly recalled how "Buddy Holly stood on this spot in 1958 and said, 'There is no way in hell, I am gonna record in this dump.'" In a later episode, Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper appear on an Itchy and Scratchy cartoon. Itchy sabotages the plane's engine, resulting in the crash that kills the musicians and pilot Scratchy. In yet another episode, Lisa discovers Sideshow Bob had won election as mayor through votes by her two dead cats, Snowball I and Snowball II, as well as Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper (whose tombstone reads "good bye, baaaaby!!"). Simpsons redirects here. ... Colonel Homer is the 20th episode of The Simpsons third season. ...


In an episode of the MTV series Clone High, Holly "guest stars", along with Ritchie Valens, the Big Bopper, and several other musicians who died in plane crashes. Clone High (occasionally referred to in the U.S. as Clone High U.S.A.) is an American animated series that aired for one season (November 2002 — April 2003) on MTV and Teletoon. ...


In episode "Victor Echo November" of The Venture Bros., Triana Orpheus says that Dean Venture "dresses like Buddy Holly, but I think he does it by accident". The Venture Bros. ...


In the Miami Vice episode "Heart of Darkness", Crockett gets mad at Elvis, his pet alligator for devouring his "entire Buddy Holly collection". For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... For other uses, see Alligator (disambiguation). ...


In episode "Cabin Fever", of "Lost", John Locke's mother is dancing to Holly's "Everyday". LOST redirects here. ... John Locke, most often referred to by his surname Locke, is a fictional character on the ABC television series Lost played by Terry OQuinn. ...


Discography

This article serves as a discography for Buddy Holly. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Buddy Holly - Singer/Songwriter. BBC.
  2. ^ "Buddy Holly" by Bruce Eder for Allmusic.com; accessed 09 January 2007
  3. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stoner Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  4. ^ Lubbock High School. Hutchinson Junior High.
  5. ^ That'll Be the Day. Rollingstone.
  6. ^ The Buddy Holly Story. Rick Thorne.
  7. ^ http://www.buddyhollyonline.com/questions.html
  8. ^ Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, Morning Edition, February 7, 1959, Section 1, Page 3
  9. ^ John Lennon on Buddy [email protected]
  10. ^ Sir Paul's fortune boosted. BBC.
  11. ^ Bob Dylan 980225 at the Grammy Awards. The Starlight, Starbright Tour.
  12. ^ http://www.hollies.co.uk/goldmineintro.html.
  13. ^ http://www.geocities.com/shakin_stacks/mikeberry.txt Mike Berry biography
  14. ^ Findadeath
  15. ^ The Day the Music Died - Music Articles
  16. ^ http://www.buddyhollyandthecricketers.co.uk/
  17. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3sSDaq31xA
  18. ^ http://www.bigboppermovie.com
  19. ^ "Quantum Leap": How the Tess Was Won - August 5, 1956 (1989) at the Internet Movie Database

January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Lubbock Avalanche-Journal is a newspaper based in Lubbock, Texas, U.S.. It is owned by the Morris Communications Company. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

Literature

  • Remembering Buddy: The Definitive Biography of Buddy Holly, by John Goldrosen and John Beecher, Da Capo Press, 2001. ISBN 0306807157
  • The Day The Music Died: The Last Tour Of Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper, And Richie Valens, by Larry Lehmer, Schirmer Trade Books, 2003. ISBN 0825672872
  • Elegy for Charles Hardin Holley, in Elegies & Epiphanies, by Hugh McFadden (Lagan Press, Belfast, 2005)

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Buddy Holly
  • Buddy Holly Online
  • "Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story" (musical)
  • Buddy Holly Tribute at Digitaldreamdoor.com
  • International Buddy Site
  • Find A Grave Entry
  • Day the Music Died; Info on crash, Coroner's Report etc.
  • Geocaching - nearly 100 photos of crash site and logs of visits
  • Buddy Holly at Last.fm
  • Buddy Holly discography at MusicBrainz
  • The Buddy Holly Recordings by Terry R. Shaw
  • Entry at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website
  • Buddy Holly at Rollingstone
  • Bob Montgomery 'Buddy and Bob' Biography
  • Walk in Lubbock Texas from Statue to Center
  • Daily Telegraph article by Julian Lloyd Webber

‹The template Lifetime is being considered for deletion.›  Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Last. ... MusicBrainz (MusicBrainz. ... Julian Lloyd Webber (born April 14, 1951) is a British cellist. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Buddy Holly (1172 words)
Holly's upbeat, pop sound became the transition between the raw rockabilly of Sun Records and the sophisticated pop rock music that would follow in the decades to come.
Holly and his band were thought to be fl by those who only heard them.
Holly's music was a major influence for such rock music legends as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, the Grateful Dead, Linda Ronstadt, Bruce Springsteen, and Elvis Costello.
Buddy Holly (1276 words)
Holly’s catalog of songs includes such standards of the rock and roll canon as “Rave On,” “Peggy Sue,”; “That’ll Be the Day,” Oh Boy!” and “Maybe Baby.” Though Holly lacked the arresting sexuality of Elvis Presley, he nonetheless cut an engaging, charismatic figure with his trademark horn-rimmed glasses and vocal hiccup.
Holly was a professed influence on the Beatles and Hollies (both of whom derived their names from his).
Buddy Holly and the Crickets share the bill with Bobby Darin, Dion and the Belmonts, Clyde McPhatter, and the Coasters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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