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Encyclopedia > Budapest
Budapest
Skyline of Budapest
Flag of Budapest
Flag
Official seal of Budapest
Seal
Nickname: "Pearl of the Danube"
or "Queen of the Danube", "Heart of Europe", "Capital of Freedom"
Location of Budapest in Hungary
Coordinates: 47°28′19″N 19°03′01″E / 47.47194, 19.05028
Country Hungary
County Budapest, Capital City
Government
 - Mayor Gábor Demszky (SZDSZ)
Area
 - City 525.16 km² (202.8 sq mi)
Population (2007)
 - City 1,696,128 HCSO
 - Density 3,232/km² (8,370.8/sq mi)
 - Metro 2,463,295 HCSO
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Website: budapest.hu
Budapest, including the Banks of the Danube, the Buda Castle Quarter and Andrássy Avenue*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party Flag of Hungary Hungary
Type Cultural
Criteria ii, iv
Reference 400
Region Europe
Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
Extensions 2002
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

Budapest (pronounced /ˈbuːdəpest/ (AE), also /ˈbju-/ (BE) or /ˈbʊ-/; Hungarian IPA: ['budɒpɛʃt]) is the capital city of Hungary and the country's principal political, cultural, commercial, industrial and transportation centre. The official language spoken is Hungarian. Budapest had 1,696,128 [1] inhabitants in 2007 (with official agglomeration 2,421,831 [2]), down from a mid-1980s peak of 2.1 million. Budapest became a single city occupying both banks of the river Danube with the amalgamation on 17 November 1873 of right-bank (west) Buda (Ofen in German) and Óbuda (Old Buda or Alt-Ofen) together with Pest on the left (east) bank. Budapest may mean: Budapest, the capital of Hungary Budapest (band), a British musical group. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Budapest. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Small map showing the location of Budapest, Hungary. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Counties of Hungary Hungary is subdivided administratively into 43 regions. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Gábor Demszky is a Hungarian politician, lawyer and sociologist by qualification. ... Party logo The Alliance of Free Democrats (Hungarian: Szabad Demokraták Szövetsége, or SZDSZ) is a liberal party in Hungary, led by Gábor Kuncze. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Andrássy Avenue or Andrássy út (lit. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File linksMetadata Szent_korona6. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... During the history of Hungary, the country has had more capitals. ... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Danube River. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Óbuda (sometimes written in English as Obuda) was a historical city in Hungary. ... Pest (in Slovak Pešť, pron. ...


Dubbed as "The City of Baths"[3], Budapest is considered an essential Central European hub[4], especially since the 1989 downfall of the Communist government in Hungary. The Buda Castle Hill, a collection of palaces, churches and monuments has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites[5], along with Andrássy Avenue and the Millennium Underground railway[6]. Budapest attracts over 20 million visitors a year[7][8], making it one of the top destinations in Europe. It is now also the third most popular destination in the world for luxury weekend getaways[9], and its Gellért Spa was named the third best thermal bath in the world[10]. Both the Central European University and the CEU Business School are based in Budapest. Mineral Spas were naturally occurring mineral spring locales which grew a reputation in the nineteenth century on into the late middle-twentith century for healing or healthful benefits to those wealthy enough to partake of their waters. ... The Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Monument of Prince Eugene of Savoy Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Andrássy Avenue or Andrássy út (lit. ... The effervescent swimming pool in Gellért Baths Gellért Thermal Baths and Swimming Pool, also called Gellért fürdÅ‘ or Gellért Baths, is one of the most beautiful and most elegant baths in Budapest, built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style. ... Central European University is a US-licensed and accredited university based in Budapest, Hungary. ... The CEU Business School is part of the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. ...


The city is home to the largest synagogue in Europe (Great Synagogue), the largest medicinal bath in Europe[11] (Széchenyi Medicinal Bath) and the third largest Parliament building in Europe[12], once the largest in the world[13]. The third largest church in Europe (Esztergom Basilica) and the second largest Baroque castle in the world (Gödöllő) are in the vicinity. ... Exterior The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (Széchenyi-gyógyfürdÅ‘) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. ... Hungarian Parliament The Parliament from above Grand Stairwell Conference Hall The Hungarian Parliament Building (Hungarian: ) is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of the Europes oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. ... The Esztergom Basilica is an ecclesiastic basilica in Esztergom, Hungary, the main church of the Archdiocese of Esztergom-Budapest, and the seat of the Catholic Church in Hungary. ... Front view of the palace of GödöllÅ‘ GödöllÅ‘ is a small town situated in Pest county, Hungary, about 30 km northeast from the outskirts of Budapest. ...

Contents

History

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 113 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 144 pixels, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Devilm25 and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Hungarian Parliament The Parliament from above Grand Stairwell Conference Hall The Hungarian Parliament Building (Hungarian: ) is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of the Europes oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. ... St Stephens Basilica (Szent István-bazilika in Hungarian) is an ecclesiastic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. ...

Prehistory and excavations

Main articles: Hungarian prehistory and Aquincum
Buda by night
Buda by night
Sándor-Palota
Sándor-Palota
Mária Magdolna Tower
Mária Magdolna Tower
Gellért Spa
Gellért Spa
Széchenyi Thermal Bath
Széchenyi Thermal Bath
The Great Synagogue
Museum of Ethnography
Museum of Ethnography
Szt. Erzsébet-templom

The first town, built by Celts, occupied about 30 hectares along the slopes of Gellért Hill (first century BC). It was called Ak Ink (meaning 'spring rich in water'). Archaeological finds suggest that it may have been a densely populated settlement, with a separate district of craftsmen (potteries and bronze foundries). It may have been a trading centre as well, as coins coming from different regions would indicate.[14] The town was occupied by the Romans at the beginning of the Christian era. Its inhabitants moved to the Danube plains, to a city retaining the Celtic name (Aquincum), in the first century. In AD 106 the city became the capital of the province Pannonia Inferior. The headquarters of the governor and significant military force were stationed here, and its population numbered about 20,000. It was frequently involved in wars on the border of the Roman Empire (formed by the Danube).[15] Explanatory note: This article was originally based on The Hungarian Old Country, written in Hungarian by professor István Kiszely, and translated into English by Csaba Hargita. ... Location of the city within the Roman Empire The ancient city of Aquincum was situated on the North-Eastern borders of the Pannonia Province within the Roman Empire. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x900, 396 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Hungarian Parliament Building Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x900, 396 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Hungarian Parliament Building Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Hungarian Parliament The Parliament from above Grand Stairwell Conference Hall The Hungarian Parliament Building (Hungarian: ) is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of the Europes oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Matthias Church Matthias Church or Mátyás-templom located in Budapest, Hungary at the heart of Budas Castle District. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution‎ (850 × 560 pixels, file size: 445 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 527 pixelsFull resolution‎ (850 × 560 pixels, file size: 445 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions Originally from en. ... Hungarian State Opera House Interior The Opera House on the left side (1896) The building of the Hungarian State Opera House (Hungarian: Magyar Állami Operaház) is a splendid example of neorenaissaince architecture. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 731 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 656 pixel, file size: 157 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 731 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 656 pixel, file size: 157 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Heroes Square – overview Heroes Square has statues representing the founders of the Magyar nation 1100 years ago Palace of Art Heroes Square (HÅ‘sök tere in Hungarian) is a large plaza in Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 433 KB)St Stephens Basilica, Budapest, Hungary, is the citys largest ecclesiastical building. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 433 KB)St Stephens Basilica, Budapest, Hungary, is the citys largest ecclesiastical building. ... St Stephens Basilica (Szent István-bazilika in Hungarian) is an ecclesiastic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links Sandor_palota. ... Image File history File links Sandor_palota. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... // The Hungarian National Museum is said to have been founded in 1802 when Count Ferenc Széchényi set up the National Széchényi Library. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2298 KB) A pillar of the Budapest Chain Bridge by night. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2298 KB) A pillar of the Budapest Chain Bridge by night. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Halászbástya of Fishermens Bastion is a terrace in neo-gothic style situated on the Buda bank of the the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 337 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (563 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to hu. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 337 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (563 × 1,000 pixels, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to hu. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 335 KB) Gellert Spa 2004 Author: Denis Barthel Licence: File links The following pages link to this file: Gellért Baths Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 335 KB) Gellert Spa 2004 Author: Denis Barthel Licence: File links The following pages link to this file: Gellért Baths Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... The effervescent swimming pool in Gellért Baths Gellért Thermal Baths and Swimming Pool, also called Gellért fürdÅ‘ or Gellért Baths, is one of the most beautiful and most elegant baths in Budapest, built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 1362 KB) Taken by Ludovic Lepeltier and by Damien Leblois on August 2004, public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 1362 KB) Taken by Ludovic Lepeltier and by Damien Leblois on August 2004, public domain. ... Exterior The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (Széchenyi-gyógyfürdÅ‘) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,848 × 2,136 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,848 × 2,136 pixels, file size: 1. ... ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1408 × 1056 pixel, file size: 370 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) saint stephens basilica I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1408 × 1056 pixel, file size: 370 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) saint stephens basilica I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... St Stephens Basilica (Szent István-bazilika in Hungarian) is an ecclesiastic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 956 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 956 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 768 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 768 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest Buda Castle ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Budapest Buda Castle ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Location of the city within the Roman Empire The ancient city of Aquincum was situated on the North-Eastern borders of the Pannonia Province within the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ...


Medieval

The Romans pulled out in the 5th century AD to be succeeded by the Huns through fierce battles[16]. Germanic tribes, Lombards, Avars and Slavs all passed through during the second Age of Migrations (following the split up of the Hun tribe, after Attila the Hun died), until the arrival of the Magyars in about 896. While other tribes spread across the entire Carpathian basin, the clan of Árpád settled down on Csepel sziget (Csepel Island), a very large island surrounded by the deep waters of the Danube, forming a good defensive shelter for the settlers who started agricultural works (south part of Budapest today). It was Árpád's brother, Buda, who gave his name to the west bank of this new settlement. Árpád was the first king of the Magyars (what Hungarians call themselves). It was under the Árpád dynasty that Hungary became a Christian state, ruled first from Esztergom and later from Székesfehérvár. The development of Buda and Pest's wide riverbanks did not really start until the 12th century, and was largely thanks to the French, Walloon and German settlers who migrated here and worked and traded along the banks of the Danube, here under royal protection. Both towns were devastated by the invading Mongols in 1241-42 and subsequently rebuilt by colonists from Germany, who re-named Buda "Ofen", after its numerous lime-kilns. (The "Pest" name, which has a Slav origin, also means "oven".) This article deals with the history of the Kingdom of Hungary from the 10th century to c. ... The German term Völkerwanderung (lit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Pannonian plain is a large plain in central/south-eastern Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Árpád Árpád (c. ... Basilica in Esztergom. ... Székesfehérvár (German: Stuhlweißenburg, Latin: Alba Regia, colloquial Hungarian: Fehérvár, Croatian: Stolni Biograd) is a city in central Hungary, located around 65 km southwest of Budapest. ...


Renaissance

During the 14th century, the Angevin kings from France established Buda as the royal seat of centralized power. They built a succession of palaces on the Várhegy or Castle Hill, reaching its height in the apogee during the Renaissance times under the reign of "Good King" Mátyás (1458-90) and his Italian-born wife, Queen Beatrice, with a golden age of prosperity and a flourishing of the arts. Hungary's catastrophic defeat by the invading Turks at Mohács in 1526, led by Suleiman I, the Magnificent Sultan, paved the way for the Turkish occupation of Buda and Pest. It lasted for 160 years until a pan-European multinational army besieged Buda Castle for six weeks, finally recapturing it at the 12th attempt, with lots of lives lost on both sides[17]. Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Ottoman Hungary or Muslim Hungary refers to the Turkish-Ottoman age of todays Hungary (1526 - 1699). ... The Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Mátyás may refer to: Mátyás Seiber, Hungarian-born composer who lived in England from 1935 onward Mátyás Szűrös, Hungarian politician See also Matthew (name) Category: ... Look up Beatrice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mohács (Croatian and Bunjevac: Mohač, Serbian: Мохач, German: Mohatsch, Turkish: Mohaç) is a town in Baranya county, Hungary on the right bank of the Danube, 115 miles south of Budapest. ...


Early Modern Period

Main articles: Palatinal Crypt, Interiors of Buda Castle, and History of Hungary 1700-1919

Under Habsburg rule, with control directly administered from Vienna or Bratislava, recovery was followed by a rejuvenating period of intense economic and architectural growth. During the second half of the eighteenth century, Budapest was often referred to as the twin city to Vienna, due to its influence in the design of the buildings during this period of "occupation"[18]. Tombstone of Palatine Joseph, work of György Zala The Palatinal Crypt (Hungarian: ; German: ) in Buda Castle, Budapest is the burial place of the Hungarian branch of the Habsburg dynasty, founded by Archduke Joseph, Palatine of Hungary. ... The interiors of Buda Castle, the former palace of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary were all destroyed during WW2 and the post-war reconstruction (except the Palatinal Crypt). ... This article describes the History of Hungary between the 18th century and the early 20th century (1699 - 1919). ...


19th Century

In the first decades of the following century, Pest became the center of the Reform movement led by Count Széchenyi, whose vision of progress was embodied in the construction of the Lánchíd (Chain Bridge). This became the first permanent bridge between Buda and Pest, which had until then, relied strictly on pontoon bridges or barges and ferries. When the Habsburg empire was shaken by a multitude of anti-king and anti-monarchy revolutions which broke out in its domain across Europe in early 1848, local reformists and radicals took advantage of the opportunity. With the leadership of Lajos Kossuth (1802-94) and the "people's rights-liberals" dominated parliament, Sándor Petőfi (1823-49), also a renowned poet, and his fellow impromptu revolutionaries began to plot downfall of the Habsburgs in Budapest at the Café Pilvax (which exists to this day in central Pest). From here, they planned and mobilized crowds on the streets of Pest, leading to the steps of the National Museum where Petőfi recited his moving "call to arms" poem which roused up the crowds and gave a push start of emotions to the people, spreading like wildfire as residents passed it on as word of mouth, creating passion for the revolution, similar to the French revolution before. After the civil war of fighting for independence ended in defeat for the Hungarians, Habsburg repression was epitomized by the newly built Citadella on top of Gellért Hill, built to frighten the citizens with its cannons and large garrison of soldiers overlooking the entire city. Following the agreement of Compromise of 1867 which made an allowance for a Dual Monarchy, familiarly known to its subjects as the K&K (based on German for "Emperor and King"), the twin cities underwent rapid growth and expansion, and finally formally merged. Pest was extensively remodeled in the image of Vienna, acquiring the main artery: Nagykörút (Great Boulevard) and Andrássy Avenue which led out to Heroes' Square and a great park with fountains and lakes. Budapest's millennial anniversary celebrations of the settlement of the Magyars in the region in 1896 brought a fresh rush of construction and development. The Heroes' Square and Vajdahunyad Castle, located at end of Andrássy Avenue are just two perfect examples of the monumental scale and style that influenced the period. New suburbs were created to make room and house the rapidly growing and financially expanding population, which by now was predominantly Magyar, although there developed a sizable German as well as a Jewish community due to immigration to the city[19]. Count István Széchenyi, in Hungarian: Gróf Széchenyi István, born in Vienna, 21 September 1791 and died in Döbling, 8 April 1860. ... The Hungarian Revolution of 1848 was one of many revolutions that year and closely linked to other revolutions of 1848 in the Habsburg areas. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Portrait of Count István Széchenyi by Friedrich von Amerling Gróf Széchenyi István (Count Stephen Széchenyi) (September 21, 1791, Vienna, Austria-Hungary – April 8, 1860 Döbling), known as The Greatest Hungarian, was a Hungarian politician and writer, one of the founding fathers of New... Széchenyi lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is a suspension bridge that spans River Danube between Buda and Pest, the west and east side of Budapest, the capital of Hungary. ... Lajos Kossuth Lajos Louis Kossuth [] (Monok, September 19, 1802–Turin, March 20, 1894) was a Hungarian lawyer, politician and Regent-President of the Kingdom of Hungary in 1849. ... Sándor PetÅ‘fi The native form of this personal name is PetÅ‘fi Sándor. ... A national museum is a museum maintained by a nation. ... Citadella upon Gellért Hill, Budapest Citadella is the Hungarian word for Citadel, a kind of fortress. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The Term Heroes Square may refer to the following places: Heldenplatz, Vienna Heroes Square, Budapest Heroes Square, Miskolc Category: ...


20th Century

Main articles: Conflict between Charles I of Austria and Miklós Horthy, Kingdom of Hungary (1920–1944), People's Republic of Hungary, Hungarian Revolution of 1956, and Goulash Communism

At the beginning of the 20th century the cultural efflorescence and sparkling energy of abundance and well-being of Budapest rivaled that of Vienna and its café society that of Paris, a belle époque extinguished by World War I. In the aftermath of defeat of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I, the development of Budapest was slowed down by political upheavals and the war of national defense with Romania and Czech-Slovakia. Later, status quo was restored by a charismatic leader in the person of Admiral Horthy (a Navy Admiral), self-appointed regent for the exiled King Karl IV. His domain and regency was characterized by gala balls as well as hunger marches by the poor, of nationalism and anti-Semitism by inheritance, again inherited by joining the wrong side (the Nazis), who promised the sweet reward of re-joining of the Hungarian nation as a whole in the post-Trianon era (which cut away half of the Hungarian population from its home and made it part of surrounding nations.) Yet Horthy was considered a moderate compared to the Arrow Cross Fascists of Hungary, whose power grew as World War II raged across Europe. Anticipating and knowing about Horthy's communication with the Allies and possible defection from the Axis alliance in 1944, Nazi Germany staged a coup and overthrew Horthy as the leader. The Germans installed an Arrow Cross government which enabled the latter to begin the unobstructed massacre of the Jews of Budapest. Before World War II, approximately 200,000 Jews lived in Budapest, making it the center of Hungarian Jewish cultural life[20]. In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Budapest was a safe haven for Jewish refugees. Before the war some 5,000 refugees, primarily from Germany and Austria, arrived in Budapest. With the beginning of deportations of Jews from Slovakia in March 1942, as many as 8,000 Slovak Jewish refugees also settled in Budapest. Hungary was allied with Nazi Germany. Despite discriminatory legislation against the Jews and widespread antisemitism, the Jewish community of Budapest was relatively secure until the German occupation of Hungary in March 1944. With the occupation, the Germans ordered the establishment of a Jewish council in Budapest and severely restricted Jewish life. Apartments occupied by Jews were confiscated. Hundreds of Jews were rounded up and interned in the Kistarcsa transit camp (originally established by Hungarian authorities), 15 miles northeast of Budapest. Between April and July 1944, the Germans and Hungarians deported Jews from the Hungarian provinces. By the end of July, the Jews in Budapest were virtually the only Jews remaining in Hungary. They were not immediately ghettoized. Instead, in June 1944, Hungarian authorities ordered the Jews into over 2,000 designated buildings scattered throughout the city. The buildings were marked with Stars of David. About 25,000 Jews from the suburbs of Budapest were rounded up and transported to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp. Hungarian authorities suspended the deportations in July 1944, sparing the remaining Jews of Budapest, at least temporarily. Many Jews searched for places of hiding or for protection. They were aided by Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg and other foreign diplomats who organized false papers and safe houses for them. These actions saved tens of thousands of Jews. In October 1944, Germany orchestrated a coup and installed a new Hungarian government dominated by the fascist Arrow Cross party. The remaining Jews of Budapest were again in grave danger. The Arrow Cross instituted a reign of terror in Budapest and hundreds of Jews were shot. Jews were also drafted for brutal forced labor. On November 8, 1944, the Hungarians concentrated more than 70,000 Jews--men, women, and children--in the Ujlaki brickyards in Obuda, and from there forced them to march on foot to camps in Austria. Thousands were shot and thousands more died as a result of starvation or exposure to the bitter cold. The prisoners who survived the death march reached Austria in late December 1944. There, the Germans took them to various concentration camps, especially Dachau in southern Germany and Mauthausen in northern Austria, and to Vienna, where they were employed in the construction of fortifications around the city. In November 1944, the Arrow Cross ordered the remaining Jews in Budapest into a closed ghetto. Jews who did not have protective papers issued by a neutral power were to move to the ghetto by early December. Between December 1944 and the end of January 1945, the Arrow Cross took as many as 20,000 Jews from the ghetto, shot them along the banks of the Danube, and threw their bodies into the river. Soviet forces liberated Budapest on February 13, 1945. More than 100,000 Jews remained in the city at liberation[21]. Upon retreating, the Germans also blew up all the Danube bridges as a way of hampering the progress of the Communist Red Army of the Soviets. A six month long siege of Budapest reduced the entire city, but mostly the Castle District to rubble, as it was assigned to the mostly Hungarian army with German leadership to defend and to "hold back". Most roofs in Budapest were blown in by Soviet bombs, walls blown in by Soviet tanks. The occupants sought shelter in cellars and ate dead horsemeat found in the streets just to survive. As the Communists gained power by force as the Americans an other Allies retreated and gave way, fearing the Communists, the former Arrow Cross torture chambers in the prisons filled up once again. But this time with the Soviet appointed staff made up mostly of opportunity seekers to gain wealth and power over their neighbors. However there was some brightness for the suffering population, his liberally inclined successor, Imre Nagy[opinion needs balancing][22]. He gave hope to the people who refused to tolerate a comeback of the earlier hardliner communists of the 1956 regime -- where tens and thousands of innocent people were massacred in the streets of Budapest -- while the Hungarian Communist leaders attempted to regain power. In Budapest, peaceful protests turned into a city-wide uprising literally overnight, with men, women and children defying Soviet tanks on the streets. Thousands of women and children slaughtered "on sight"[opinion needs balancing], day and night if found on the streets or at whim. Starvation and oppression was used as a standard tool by the Communist Hungarians who changed sides for their own gains[unreliable source?][23]. Random arrests initiated many times by neighbors as informants made people disappear into trucks, never to be heard from again. Soviet power had been forcefully restored, and a new Soviet-elected leader emerged in the person of János Kádár. He embarked on cautious reforms to create a "Goulash Communism" that made Hungary stand out from its Warsaw Pact neighbors. Due to the cooperative efforts of Kádár and huge loans taken from the West to offset the failing economy, Hungary became the favorite Communist state of the West by the late 1970's. A decade later, the self-empowered regime saw the writing on the wall and anticipated Gorbachev by promising free elections hoping to reap public gratitude[opinion needs balancing][24]. Instead, as Communism was toppled in Berlin and Prague, the only party, the Communist Party, was simply voted out of power in Hungary, initiating a peaceful transition from one system to another. Hungarians simply refer to all that has happened since then as "the Changes". After Miklós Horthy had been chosen Regent of Hungary on 1 March 1920, Charles IV of Hungary (Charles I of Austria) returned to Hungary twice, each time trying unsuccessfully to retake his throne. ... Map of Hungary before after the Vienna Awards and the invasion of Yugoslavia in World War II. Capital Budapest Language(s) Hungarian Religion Roman Catholic Government Constitutional monarchy King Vacant ¹ Regent Miklós Horthy Prime Minister  - 1920 Sándor Simonyi-Semadam (first)  - 1944 Géza Lakatos (last) Legislature National Assembly... The Peoples Republic of Hungary was the name used by Hungary from 1949 to 1989 during its Communist period. ... Combatants Soviet Union; ÁVH (Hungarian State Security Police) Ad hoc local Hungarian militias Commanders Ivan Konev Various independent militia leaders Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks Unknown number of militia and rebelling soldiers Casualties 722 killed, 1,251 wounded[1] 2,500 killed 13,000 wounded[2] The Hungarian... Goulash Communism (Hungarian: gulyáskommunizmus) is a term sometimes used to denote the variety of socialism as practised in the Hungarian Peoples Republic between 1962-63 and 1989. ... Admiral Horthy inspecting the German fleet with Adolf Hitler Miklós Horthy de Nagybánya (Vitéz Nagybányai Horthy Miklós in Hungarian) (June 18, 1868–February 9, 1957) was a Hungarian Admiral and statesman and served as the Regent of Hungary from March 1, 1920 until October... The negotiations on June 4, 1920. ... Flag of the Arrow Cross Party The Arrow Cross (Nyilaskereszt) originated in Hungary in the 1930s as the symbol of the leading Hungarian fascist political party, the Arrow Cross Party, led by Ferenc Szálasi, an ex-army major. ... For other organizations known as the Red Army, see Red Army (disambiguation). ... Imre Nagy. ... POV, as opposed to NPOV, in an article means that it is affected by an editors point of view. ... POV, as opposed to NPOV, in an article means that it is affected by an editors point of view. ... János Kádár, né Giovanni Csermanek (his Italian first name was due to the laws of Fiume, his father denied paternity and refused to support his mother Borbála[1]) (May 26, 1912–July 6, 1989), was the communist leader of Hungary from 1956 to 1988, and twice... Goulash Communism (Hungarian: gulyáskommunizmus) is a term sometimes used to denote the variety of socialism as practised in the Hungarian Peoples Republic between 1962-63 and 1989. ... Not to be confused with the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ; Pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHOFF) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... POV, as opposed to NPOV, in an article means that it is affected by an editors point of view. ...


Present day


Following the transition of the political system, Budapest succeeded in taking advantage of new economic possibilities and pursuing development more efficiently than the other parts of the country. Upon the shutdown of Socialist industrial plants plenty of new workplaces were generated, especially on the fields of service and trade industries. In the Budapest area unemployment is the lowest and average income per capita is the highest. The local government law legislated after the transition provided new rights or licenses for the districts of Budapest. The Metropolitan Government has difficulties conducting an autonomous civic policy. Local minority governments had also sprang forth, active mainly on cultural fields. Soroksár was added as a new autonomous district in 1994.
Gábor Demszky, a member of the liberal Alliance of Free Democrats (SZDSZ), has been the mayor of Budapest since 1990. Gábor Demszky is a Hungarian politician, lawyer and sociologist by qualification. ... The Republic of Hungary is an independent, democratic and constitutional state. ... Gábor Demszky is a Hungarian politician, lawyer and sociologist by qualification. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Stylized party logo Simple party logo The Alliance of Free Democrats - the Hungarian Liberal Party (Hungarian: Szabad-Demokraták szövetsége - a Magyar Liberális Párt, abbreviation SZDSZ) is a liberal party in Hungary, led by Gábor Kuncze. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


The capital city is the centre of all political affairs, with most countries' embassies located in the city.


Timeline of the history of Budapest

Year Event
B.C.  Neolithic, Chalcolithic-, bronze and iron age cultures, Celtic and Eravisci settlements on present day Budapest.
1st Century Romans found the settlements known as Aquincum, Contra-Aquincum and Campona. Aquincum becomes the largest town of the Danubian region and one of the capitals of Pannonia.
5th Century The Age of Huns. King Attila builds a city for himself here according to later chronicles.
896 Following the establishment of Hungary, Chieftain Árpád settles in the "Town of Attila", usually identified as Aquincum.
1046 Bishop Gellért dies at the hands of pagans on present day Gellért Hill.
1241 During the Tatar Invasions both towns are destroyed. King Béla IV builds the first Royal castle on Castle Hill, Buda in 1248. The new town adopts the name of Buda from the earlier one (present day Óbuda). Pest is surrounded by city walls.
1270 Saint Margaret of Hungary dies in a cloister on the Isle of Rabbits (present day Margaret Island).
1458 The people of Hungary elect Hunyadi Mátyás as a king on the ice of the Danube. Under his reign Buda becomes the main hub of European Renaissance.
1541 The beginning of Ottoman occupation. The Turkish Pashas build multiple mosques and baths in Buda.
1686 Buda and Pest are reconquered from the Turks with Habsburg leadership. Both towns are destroyed completely in the battles.
1690's Resettlement, initially only a few hundred German settlers.
1773 Election of the first Mayor of Pest.
1777 Maria Theresa of Austria moves the Nagyszombat University to Castle Hill.
1783 Joseph II places the acting government (Helytartótanács) and Magyar Kamara on Buda.
1795. 20 May. Martinovics Ignác and other Jacobin leaders are executed on Vérmező or 'The Field of Blood'.
1810 The Tabán fire.
1825 Commencement of the Reform Age, Pest becomes the cultural and economic center of the country, the first National Theatre is built along with the Hungarian National Museum and the Széchenyi Lánchíd.
1848. 15 March. Start of the Revolution and Freedom Wars of 1848-49. Pest becomes the new capital in place of Bratislava, the Batthyány Government.
1849 The Austrians occupy the city, but the Hungarian Honvédsereg (National Guard) reclaims it as one of the major successes of the war.
1849. 6 Oct. Batthyány Lajos, the first Hungarian Prime Minister is executed on present day Szabadság tér.
1867 Ausgleich, followed by unprecedented civic development, resulting in the style of present day Budapest.
1873 The former cities: Pest, Buda and Óbuda are united, and with that the hungarian capitol is established with the name of Budapest.
1874 The rack (or cog-wheel) railway (Fogaskerekű) service is inaugurated.
1896 Millennium celebrations, the Millennium Underground railway is inaugurated, and the Ferenc József híd (today's Liberty Bridge) is opened.
19091910 Electronic public lighting.
19181919 Revolution and the period of the Hungarian Soviet Republic (March-August 1919) under the leadership of Béla Kun. It is the first Communist government to be formed in Europe after the October Revolution in Russia.
1924 Hungarian National Bank is founded.
1925 Hungarian Radio starts its broadcast.
1933 Disassembly of the Tabán commences.
1944. 19 Mar. Budapest is occupied by the Germans.
1945. 15 Jan18 Jan. The retreating Germans blow up all Danube bridges.
1945. 11 Feb. Russian troops destroy German forces. World War II took the lives of more than one hundred thousand Budapest residents. Heavy damage to the buildings.
1956. 23 Oct. –
4 Nov.
The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 breaks out, ending in the invasion of a large Soviet force.
1960's Wartime damages are by and large corrected. Bridges are rebuilt, and Elizabeth Bridge is added.
19701972 East-Western Metro is inaugurated (first phase).
1982 North-Southern Metro is inaugurated (first phase).
1987 Castle Hill, Buda and the banks of the Danube are included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
1990 2 016 100 residents
2002 Andrássy Avenue and its historic milieu is also included in the World heritage Sites, along with the Millennium Underground railway and Heroes' Square.

An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... The Chalcolithic (Greek khalkos + lithos copper stone) period or Copper Age period (also known as the Eneolithic (Aeneolithic)), is a phase in the development of human culture in which the use of early metal tools appeared alongside the use of stone tools. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... The Eravisci, a Celtic people, were the original inhabitants of Dunaújváros. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of the city within the Roman Empire The ancient city of Aquincum was situated on the North-Eastern borders of the Pannonia Province within the Roman Empire. ... Pest (pronounced , Slovak: PeÅ¡Å¥, Croatian: PeÅ¡ta, Serbian: Пешта) is the eastern, mostly flat part of Budapest, comprising about two thirds of the capitals territory. ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Events The Bulgarians, under Simeon I, defeat the Byzantine Empire at Bulgarophygon. ... Árpád Árpád (c. ... // Events First contact between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuks. ... Gerard Sagredo (also known as Gellért, c. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Events April 5 - Mongols of Golden Horde under the command of Subotai defeat feudal Polish nobility, including Knights Templar, in the battle of Liegnitz April 27 - Mongols defeat Bela IV of Hungary in the battle of Sajo. ... The Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... For broader historical context, see 1240s and 13th century. ... Óbuda (sometimes written in English as Obuda) was a historical city in Hungary. ... Pest (pronounced pesht) is the eastern, mostly flat part of Budapest, comprising about two thirds of the capitals territory. ... The cathedral atop the Rock of Cashel in Ireland was completed in 1270. ... Saint Margaret (Castle of Klisa, January 27, 1242 – St. ... The Water Tower, a famous landmark on Margaret Island. ... Events January 24 - Matthias I Corvinus becomes king of Hungary Foundation of Magdalen College, University of Oxford George of Podebrady becomes king of Bohemia Pope Pius II becomes pope Turks sack the Acropolis Births February 15 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (d. ... Matthias Corvinus as depicted in Chronica Hungarorum by Carl van Vechten Matthias Corvinus (Matthias the Just) (b. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ... This article is about Eötvös Loránd University, which is often referred to as the University of Budapest. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Joseph II may refer to either: Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jacobin may refer to: Members of the Jacobin Club, a political group during the French Revolution Jacobin (politics) and Jacobinism, pejorative epithets for left-wing revolutionary politics The term is unrelated to Jacobitism and the Jacobean era, both of which are related to the Stuart Dynasty in Great Britain. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Tabán is a small neighborhood in central Budapest that is situated just west of Castle Hill. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Several countries have a National Theatre. ... // The Hungarian National Museum is said to have been founded in 1802 when Count Ferenc Széchényi set up the National Széchényi Library. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Bratislava within Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Region Districts Bratislava I-V City subdivisions 17 city boroughs Cadastral areas 20 cadastral areas First mentioned 907 Government  - Type City council  - Mayor (Primátor) Andrej ÄŽurkovský  - Headquarters Primates Palace Area [1]  - City 367. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in Leap years). ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The German term Ausgleich (Hungarian kiegyezés) refers to the compromise or composition of February 1867 that established the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary, which was signed by Franz Joseph of Austria and a Hungarian delegation led by Ferenc Deák. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Look up Pest in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Pest may refer to: A pest, an animal (usually an insect), or sometimes a plant (weed) with characteristics that are injurious or harmful to humans. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Óbuda (sometimes written in English as Obuda) was a historical city in Hungary. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Szabadság híd (Liberty bridge) is a bridge in Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the River Danube. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Flag Capital Budapest Language(s) Hungarian Government Socialist republic History  - Established March 21, 1919  - Downfall August 6, 1919 The Hungarian Soviet Republic (Hungarian: Magyarországi Tanácsköztársaság) was a Communist regime established in Hungary from March 21 until August 6, 1919, under the leadership of Béla... Béla Kun Béla Kun (born Béla Kohn) (February 20, 1886, in Szilágycseh, today Cehu Silvaniei, Transylvania, Romania, died August 29, 1938 in the Soviet Union) was a Hungarian Communist politician, who ruled Hungary for a brief period in 1919. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Hungarian National Bank (in Hungarian: Magyar Nemzeti Bank) is the central bank of Hungary. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Magyar Rádió (Hungarian Radio) company, headquartered at Budapest with several offices in the countryside, runs the state-sponsored radio stations of the Hungarian Republic. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tabán is a small neighborhood in central Budapest that is situated just west of Castle Hill. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... Combatants Soviet Union; ÁVH (Hungarian State Security Police) Ad hoc local Hungarian militias Commanders Ivan Konev Various independent militia leaders Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks Unknown number of militia and rebelling soldiers Casualties 722 killed, 1,251 wounded[1] 2,500 killed 13,000 wounded[2] The Hungarian... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Erzsébet híd in the foreground, seen from Gellért Hill Erzsébet híd, Erzsébet Bridge or Elisabeth Bridge is the second newest bridge and one of the most elegant ones of Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the River Danube. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Andrássy Avenue or Andrássy út (lit. ...

Famous people of Budapest

The following were either born in Budapest or became important members of its community:

A

B Endre Ady Endre Ady (November 22, 1877 – January 27, 1919) was a Hungarian poet, one of the most important poets not only in the 20th century but in Hungarian literature in general. ... Franz Alexander, (1891–1964) was a graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic born in Budapest. ... Gyula Andrássy (by Gyula Benczúr, 1884) Gyula, Count Andrássy de Csíkszentkirály et Krasznahorka (csíkszentkirályi és krasznahorkai gróf Andrássy Gyula in Hungarian) (born Kassa, Kingdom of Hungary (now Košice, Slovakia), March 3, 1823 – died Volosca, February 18, 1890) was a Hungarian... The poet Arany. ...

C Mihály Babits (November 26, 1883 in Szekszárd - August 4, 1941 in Budapest) was a Hungarian poet and translator. ... Michael Balint - Bálint Mihály (December 3, 1896, Budapest- December 31, 1970, Bristol) was a psychoanalyst and proponent of the Object Relations school. ... Donát Bánki (1859-1922) was a Hungarian mechanical engineer, inventor of (among many other things) the carburetor. ... Gábor Baross (1848—1892), Hungarian statesman, was born at Trenčín on the 6th of July 1848, and educated at Esztergom. ... Bartok redirects here. ... Hungarian Zoltán Lajos Bay (1900-1992) [1] was a physicist, professor, and engineer who developed microwave technology, including tungsten lamps. ... Tibor Benedek (born July 12, 1972) is a Hungarian water polo player who played on the gold medal squads at the 2000 Summer Olympics and 2004 Summer Olympics. ... Dániel Berzsenyi (May 7, 1776 in Hetye (now: Egyházashetye) - February 24, 1836 in Nikla) was a Hungarian poet. ... Gyula Breyer (1893 – 1921) was a Hungarian chess player. ... Akos Buzsaky (born May 7, 1982) is a Hungarian footballer, playing in midfield for Plymouth Argyle since January 21, 2005. ...

D Ibolya Csák (born 6 January 1915 - died 9 February 2006) is best known as the winner of the womens high jump at the Berlin Olympics in 1936. ... Csontváry Kosztka Tivadar [] (1853-1919) was a Hungarian painter. ... Zoltán Czibor (23 August 1929 - 1 September 1997) was a Hungarian footballer from the Magic Magyars era. ...

E Tamás Darnyi was an Hungarian male swimmer. ... Miksa Déri (1854 - 1938), was a Hungarian electrical engineer, co-inventor of the transformer and the ZBD model AC electrical generator. ... ErnÅ‘ Dohnányi, also known as Ernst von Dohnányi or Dohnányi ErnÅ‘ (July 27, 1877 – February 9, 1960) was a Hungarian conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Antal Dor ti (April 9, 1906 - November 13, 1988) was a conductor and composer. ...

F Krisztina Egerszegi [] (born August 16, 1974) is one of the greatest Hungarian Olympic champions of the modern era. ... Ilona Elek-Schacherer (May 17, 1907 - July 24, 1988) was a Hungarian Olympic fencer. ... Vásárosnaményi Báró Eötvös Loránd, better known as Loránd Eötvös or Roland Eotvos (July 27, 1848 - April 8, 1919) was a Hungarian physicist. ... Peter Eötvös (born 1944) is a composer and conductor. ... Zsolt Erdei (born May 31, 1974 in Budapest, Hungary) is a boxer in the light heavyweight division. ... Paul Erdos Paul Erdős (March 26, 1913 – September 20, 1996) was an immensely prolific and famously eccentric mathematician who, with hundreds of collaborators, worked on problems in combinatorics, graph theory, number theory, classical analysis, approximation theory, set theory and probability theory. ... Ferenc Erkel (November 7, 1810, Gyula - June 25, 1893, Budapest) was a Hungarian composer. ... Count Péter Esterházy de Galántha (occasionally written Eszterházy) is one of the most widely known contemporary Hungarian writers. ...

G György Faludy or George Faludy (September 22, 1910, Budapest - September 1, 2006, Budapest) was a Hungarian-Jewish poet, writer and translator. ... Ferenczi, furthest right in the back row, with Freud, Carl Jung, and others in front of Clark University in 1909. ... Béni Ferenczy Béni Ferenczy(1890 Szentendre - 1967 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor and graphic artist. ... Árpád Feszty (December 24, 1856 - June 1, 1914) was a Hungarian painter. ... André François (November 9, 1915 – April 11, 2005) was a French cartoonist. ...

H Dennis Gabor (Gábor Dénes) (June 5, 1900, Budapest – February 9, 1979, London) was a Hungarian physicist and inventor who is most notable for inventing holography. ... Ábrahám Ganz (November 6, 1815, Unter-Embrach - December 15, 1867, Pest) was a Swiss-born Hungarian iron manufacturer, machine and technical engineer, father of the Ganz companies. ... Aladár Gerevich of Hungary (born 16 March 1910, Jászberény, – died 14 May 1991 Budapest) won medals in sabre fencing in six Olympics, the only athlete to do so, and the only athlete to win the same event six times (despite two games passed because of the Second... Árpád Göncz Árpád Göncz (left) with fellow artist Károly Makk (right) Árpád Göncz (born February 10, 1922 in Budapest) is a Hungarian liberal politician and former President of The Republic (May 2, 1990–August 4, 2000). ... Gyula Grosics (born 4 February 1926 in Tatabanya, Hungary) was a football goalkeeper with the Magical Magyars of Hungary in the 1950s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

I Alfréd Hajós (February 1, 1878 – November 12, 1955) was an Hungarian swimmer and architect. ... Miklós Hargitay, popularly known as Mickey Hargitay (January 6, 1926 – September 14, 2006) was an actor and Mr. ... Theodor Herzl, in his middle age. ... Nándor Hidegkuti (March 3, 1922 - February 14, 2002) was a Hungarian footballer. ... Géza Hofi’s bronze statue in Budapest Géza Hofi (born July 2, 1936 in Budapest; died April 10, 2002 in Budapest) was a Hungarian actor and comedian. ... Horthy redirects here. ...

  • Illés, György
  • Irinyi, János
  • Izsó, Miklós

J External links János Irinyi ... Miklós Izsó(1831 Disznóshorvát - 1875 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor. ...

K Miklós Jancsó at home, 2000 Miklós Jancsó (Vác, September 27, 1921) is a Hungarian film director and screenwriter. ... György Jendrassik (1898-1954) was born in Budapest, Hungary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... Attila József The native form of this personal name is József Attila. ...

L Gyula Kabos Gyula Kabos (19 March 1887; Budapest - 6 October 1941; New York). ... Pál Kadosa (1903–1983) was a leading Hungarian composer of the post Bartók generation. ... Ede Kallós(1866 Hódmezővásárhely - 1950 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor. ... Kálmán Kandó (Kandó Kálmán) (July 10, 1869 - January 13, 1931, Budapest) Hungarian engineer. ... József Kármán (1769-1795), Hungarian author, was born at Losoncz on the 14th of March 1769, the son of a Calvinist pastor. ... Theodore von Kármán (Szőllőskislaki Kármán Tódor) (May 11, 1881 – May 6, 1963) was an engineer and physicist who was active primarily in the fields of aeronautics during the seminal era in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Count Mihály Adam Georg Nikolaus Károlyi von Nagykárolyi (March 4, 1875-March 20, 1955) was briefly Hungarys leader in 1918-19 during an ill-fated spell of democracy. ... Lajos Kassák (March 21, 1887-July 22, 1967) was a Hungarian poet, novelist, painter, essayist, editor, theoretician of the avant-garde and occasional translator, was the father of many modernisms. ... József Katona - and the big scene of his Bánk bán. ... Ferenc Kazinczy (October 27, 1759 - August 22, 1831) was a Hungarian author, the most indefatigable agent in the regeneration of the Magyar language and literature at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th century. ... Baron Zsigmond Kemény (June 12, 1814–December 22, 1875) was a Hungarian author. ... Károly Kerényi One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Károly (Carl, Karl) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in modern-day Timisoara, Romania, and then lived in Hungary. ... André Kertész (Born Andor Kertész July 2, 1894 - September 28, 1985) was a Hungary-born photographer distinguished by haunting composition in his photographs and was also a progenitor of the photo essay. ... Zsigmond Kisfaludi Stróbl(1884 Alsórajk - 1975 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor and artist. ... Sándor Kocsis Peter (born Budapest, Hungary, September 21, 1929; died Barcelona, July 22, 1979), also referred to as Kocsis Sándor, was a Hungarian footballer who played for Ferencváros TC, Budapest Honvéd, Young Fellows Zürich, CF Barcelona and Hungary. ... Zoltán Kodály (IPA: ), (pronunciation, Zol-tan Kod-eye) (November 16, 1882 – March 6, 1967) was a Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist, educator, linguist and philosopher. ... Lajos Koltai, ASC, HSC, (born April 2, 1946 in Budapest, Hungary) is a Hungarian cinematographer and film director best known for his work with legendary Hungarian director Istvan Szabo, and Italian filmmaker Giuseppe Tornatore. ... György (George) Konrád (born 1933) is a Hungarian novelist and essayist, known as an advocate of individual freedom. ... János Kornai, (1928-), born in Budapest, Hungary, is an economist noted for his criticism of the command economies of Eastern European communist states. ... Domokos Kosáry ( July 31, 1913 Banská Štiavnica, Austria-Hungary - November 15, 2007 Budapest) was a Hungarian historian and writer who served as president of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences from 1990 until 1996. ... Lajos Kossuth Lajos Louis Kossuth [] (Monok, September 19, 1802–Turin, March 20, 1894) was a Hungarian lawyer, politician and Regent-President of the Kingdom of Hungary in 1849. ... István Kovács (born August 17, 1970 in Budapest) is a Hungarian boxer. ... László Kovács László Kovács (pronounced ) (born 3 July 1939) is a Hungarian politician and diplomat, currently serving as European Commissioner for Taxation and Customs Union. ... Pál Kovács (1912-1995) Born in Debrecen, Hungary,he was a fencer with a brilliant talent, though he started out as a highjumper. ... Lily Kronberger was a Hungarian figure skater. ... Béla Kun Béla Kun (born Béla Kohn) (February 20, 1886, in Szilágycseh, today Cehu Silvaniei, Transylvania, Romania, died August 29, 1938 in the Soviet Union) was a Hungarian Communist politician, who ruled Hungary for a brief period in 1919. ... György Kurtág (born February 19, 1926) is a Hungarian composer of contemporary music. ...

M Imrich Lichtenfeld later known as Imi Sde-Or Founder of the self-defence system Krav Maga. ... Miklós Ligeti(1871 Pest - 1944 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor and artist. ... Andre Lilienthal (born 5 May 1911) is a Hungarian chess grandmaster. ... Liszt redirects here. ... Johann Löwenthal Johann Jacob Löwenthal (July 15, 1810 – July 24, 1876) was a 19th century professional chess master. ...

N Imre Madách (January 21, 1823, Alsósztregova, now Dolná Strehová, Slovakia - October 5, 1864, Alsósztregova) is the Hungarian author of Az ember tragédiája (The Tragedy of Man). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Imre Makovecz, born November 20, 1935 in Budapest, Hungary, is a Hungarian architect active in Europe from the late 1950s onward. ... Sándor Márai (detail of his statue in Košice, Slovakia) Sándor Márai (originally Sándor Károly Henrik Grosschmied de Mára) (April 11, 1900 – February 22, 1989) was a Hungarian writer and journalist. ... A statue of Kossuth completed by Margo in the Zamadi chapel in 1910 Ede Margó(1871 Pest - 1944 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor and artist. ... Géza Maróczy (pronounced GEH-zaw MAHR-ot-see, not MarOXy) (3 March 1870—29 May 1951) was a leading Hungarian chess master, one of the best players in the world in his time. ... Ferenc Medgyessy (1881 - 1958) was a Hungarian sculptor and physician. ... Baron Ladislaus Josephus Balthasar Eustachius Mednyánszky (23rd April 1852 - 19th April 1919), commonly referred to by his Hungarian birth name, László Mednyánszky, or his Slovakian name, Ladislav Medňanský, was a Hungarian-Slovakian painter in the Impressionist tradition. ... Opika von Méray Horváth, or Zsófia Méray-Horváth (* December 30, 1889 Arad; † April 25, 1977 Budapest) was a Hungarian figure skater. ... Cardinal József Mindszenty (pronounced yor-zhef meend-sen-tee) (March 29, 1892 – May 6, 1975) was a Hungarian Cardinal and steadfast opponent of the Hungarian communist regime. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zsigmond Móricz (1879–1942) was a Hungarian novelist and social realist. ...

NY Imre Nagy. ... For other persons named John Neumann, see John Neumann (disambiguation). ...

O Ervin Nyíregyházi (Budapest, 19 January 1903 – Los Angeles, 8 August 1987) was a Hungarian-born American pianist. ...

  • Orosz, István

P István Orosz (b. ...

R George Pál (February 1, 1908 - May 2, 1980) was a Hungarian-born American animator and film producer. ... László Papp (March 25, 1926 - October 16, 2003) was a boxer from Hungary. ... János Pásztor (1881, Gyoma - 1945, Budapest) was a renown Hungarian academic sculptor in the first decades of the 20th century. ... Sándor PetÅ‘fi The native form of this personal name is PetÅ‘fi Sándor. ... Michael Polanyi (born Polányi Mihály) (March 11, 1891 – February 22, 1976) was a Hungarian–British polymath whose thought and work extended across physical chemistry, economics, and philosophy. ... Grandmaster Susan Polgar (born April 19, 1969, as Zsuzsanna Zsuzsa Polgár (nee Polgar Zsuzsanna)) is a Hungarian-born American chess player. ... Judit Polgár (born July 23, 1976) is a Hungarian chess grandmaster. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Lajos Portisch (born April 4, 1937 in Zalaegerszeg, Hungary) is a Hungarian chess Grandmaster, whose positional style earned him the nickname of the Hungarian Botvinnik. One of the strongest non-Soviet players from the early 1960s into the late 1980s, he participated in twelve straight Interzonals, and qualified for the... Tivadar Puskás (17 September 1844 - 16 March 1893) was a Hungarian inventor, telephone pioneer, inventor of the telephone exchange. ... Ferenc Puskás (April 2, 1927–November 17, 2006) (Hungarian: Puskás Ferenc, nickname Puskás Öcsi, Spanish: Ferenc Puskas Biro), was a legendary Hungarian football forward and coach. ...

S Sandor (Alexander) Rado (Hungarian Radó Sándor 5 November 1899, Újpest – 1981 – Budapest) was a Hungarian-born Soviet military intelligence agent during World War II. Rado was born in a Jewish family in Újpest near Budapest. ... Ferenc Rófusz is a Academy-Award winner Hungarian animator. ... Geza Roheim (1891 – 1953) was a Hungarian psychoanalyst and anthropologist. ... József Róna(1861 Lovasberény - 1939 Budapest) was a Hungarian sculptor and artist. ... Ernő Rubik Ernő Rubik (born July 13, 1944) is a Hungarian inventor, sculptor and professor of architecture. ...

SZ Albert Schickedanz (October 14, 1846 - July 11, 1915) was a Hungarian architect and painter in the Eclectic style. ... Thomas Albert Sebeok (born in Budapest, Hungary, on November 9, 1920, died December 21, 2001 in Bloomington, Indiana) was one of the most prolific and wide-ranging of US semioticians. ... Gusztáv Sebes (June 21, 1906 – January 30, 1986) was a Hungarian football (soccer) coach. ... Soros redirects here. ... The Honourable Anna Ilona Staller (or credited as originally named, Anna Elena Staller, 26 November 1951 - ), also known by her stage name Cicciolina, is an Italian-Hungarian porn star turned politician and the first hardcore performer in the world to be elected to a democratic parliament. ...

T István Szabó, 2004 István Szabó (born February 18, 1938 in Budapest) is both the best-known and one of the most critically acclaimed Hungarian film director of the past few decades. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... // Headline text László Szabó (March 19, 1917 – August 8, 1998) was a prominent Hungarian International Grandmaster of chess. ... József Szabó von Szentmiklós (March 14, 1822 – April 12, 1894), Hungarian geologist, was born at Kalocsa. ... Szasz redirects here. ... Victor G. Szebehely (1921 - September 13, 1997) was a key figure in the development and success of the Apollo program. ... Count István Széchenyi, in Hungarian: Gróf Széchenyi István, born in Vienna, 21 September 1791 and died in Döbling, 8 April 1860. ... Albert Szent-Györgyi at the time of his appointment to the National Institutes of Health Albert Szent-Györgyi de Nagyrápolt (September 16, 1893 – October 22, 1986) was a Hungarian physiologist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1937. ... Leó Szilárd (right) working with Albert Einstein. ...

V Béla Tarr (born July 21, 1955 in Pécs, Hungary) is a Hungarian film director and screenwriter widely considered as the most unique artist to rise from Hungary in the past 20 years. ... Mária Telkes Mária Telkes (1900 - 1995) was a Hungarian-American scientist and inventor who worked on solar energy technologies. ... Edward Teller (original Hungarian name Teller Ede) (January 15, 1908 – September 9, 2003) was a Hungarian-born American theoretical physicist, known colloquially as the father of the hydrogen bomb, even though he did not care for the title. ... Count István Fürst Tisza von Borosjenő (1861-1918) was a Hungarian politician. ...

W Victor Vasarely (Vásárhelyi Győző) (9 April 1906, Pécs - 15 March 1997, Paris) was a French Hungarian-born artist often acclaimed as the father of Op-art. ... László Vidovszky (b. ... The Hungarian poet Vörösmarty Mihály Vörösmarty (December 1, 1800 - November 19, 1855), Hungarian poet, was born at Puszta-Nyék, of a noble Roman Catholic family. ...

Z Tamás Waliczky, born in 1959, Budapest, Hungary, works as a media artist. ... Raoul Gustav Wallenberg (August 4, 1912 – July 16, 1947?)[1][2][3] was a Swedish humanitarian sent to Budapest, Hungary under diplomatic cover to rescue Jews from the Holocaust. ... Baron Miklós Wesselényi (1796-1850), Hungarian statesman, son of Baron Miklós Wesselényi and Ilona Cserei, was born at Zsibó, and was educated at his fathers castle by Mózes Pataky in the most liberal and patriotic direction. ...

ZS Károly Zipernowsky (1853 - 1942), was a Hungarian electrical engineer, co-inventor of the transformer and other AC technologies. ...

Vilmos Zsigmond (born June 16, 1930) is a Hungarian-American cinematographer. ...

Districts

Main article: List of districts in Budapest

Originally Budapest had 10 districts after coming into existence upon the unification of the three cities in 1873. On 1 January 1950 Budapest was united with several neighboring towns and the number of its districts was raised to 22. At that time there were changes both in the order of districts and in their sizes. Now there are 23 districts, 6 in Buda, 16 in Pest and 1 on Csepel island between them. Each district can be associated with one or more city parts named after former towns within Budapest. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Budapest, the capital of Hungary has 23 districts, each with its own municipal government. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Islands

Seven islands can be found on the Danube: Hajógyári sziget (literal translation: Shipyard Island), Margit-sziget (Margaret Island), and Csepel sziget (the northernmost part of this island belonging to Budapest is a separate district of the city, the XXI., while the other islands are parts of other districts, the III. and XIII. respectively), Palotai-sziget (in fact, it's a peninsula today), Népsziget (connected to the above, but mostly surrounded by water), Háros-sziget and Molnár-sziget. Margaret Island on the Danube (see the above part) Margaret Island (also Margitsziget, Margit-sziget; occasionally Margit Island) is a 2. ... Csepel is District XXI of Budapest, in the south. ...


Notable islands:

  • Margit-sziget is a 2.5 km (1.6 mi) long island and 0.965 square kilometres (238 acres) in area. The island mostly consists of a park and is a popular recreational area for tourists and locals alike. The island lies between bridges Margaret Bridge (south) and Árpád Bridge (north). Dance clubs, Swimming pools, an Aqua park, athletic and fitness centers, bicycle and running tracks can be found around the Island. During the day the island is occupied by people doing sports, or just resting. In the summer (generally on the weekends) mostly young people go to the island at night to party in its terraces, or to recreate with a bottle of alcohol on a bench or on a grass (this form of entertainment is sometimes referred to as bench-partying)
  • Csepel-sziget [ˈtʃɛpɛlsigɛt] or Csepel Island is the largest island of the River Danube in Hungary. It is 48 km (30 mi) long; its width is 6-8 km (3.75–5 mi) and its area comprises 257 km² (99 sq mi), whereas only the northern tip is inside the city limits.
  • Hajógyári-sziget [ˈhɒjo:ɟa:ri sigɛt] (or Óbudai-sziget) is a man built island, located in the third district. This island hosts many activities such as: wake-boarding, jet-skiing during the day, and dance clubs during the night. This is the island where the famous Sziget Festival takes place, hosting hundreds of performances per year and now around 400,000 visitors in its last edition. Many building projects are taking place to make this island into one of the biggest entertainment centers of Europe, the plan is to build Apartment buildings, hotels, casinos and a marina.
  • Luppa-sziget is the smallest island of Budapest, located in the north region.

Margaret Island on the Danube (see the above part) Margaret Island (also Margitsziget, Margit-sziget; occasionally Margit Island) is a 2. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Margit híd or Margaret Bridge (sometimes Margit Bridge) is a bridge in Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the Danube. ... Árpád Bridge or Árpád híd is a bridge in Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the Danube. ... For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool (film). ... Fun at a water park Ariel view of Sunway Lagoon, a popular Water Park in Malaysia. ... Csepel-sziget (pronounced CHE-pel see-get) or Csepel Island is the largest island of the River Danube in Hungary. ... Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... The Sziget Festival (pronounced as see-get) is Europes largest music and cultural festival (400,000 visitors), held annually in July or August in Budapest, Hungary. ... A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ...

Landmarks and monuments

Budapest in the night from the Danube Promenade, from the left Tabán Church, Naphegy, Buda Castle

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3664x793, 493 KB)[edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Tabán is a small neighborhood in central Budapest that is situated just west of Castle Hill. ... Naphegy (Sun Hill, literally: Sun Mountain) is a historic part of Krisztinaváros, near to old Tabán in the District I. of Budapest, Hungary. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ...

Panoramic view points

Naphegy (Sun Hill, literally: Sun Mountain) is a historic part of Krisztinaváros, near to old Tabán in the District I. of Budapest, Hungary. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Krisztinaváros (Christine Town) is a small neighborhood in central Budapest that is situated just west of Castle Hill, north of Tabán. ... The Halászbástya of Fishermens Bastion is a terrace in neo-gothic style situated on the Buda bank of the the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. ... Pest (in Slovak Pešť, pron. ... Tabán is a small neighborhood in central Budapest that is situated just west of Castle Hill. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Erzsébet híd in the foreground, seen from Gellért Hill Erzsébet híd, Erzsébet Bridge or Elisabeth Bridge is the second newest bridge and one of the most elegant ones of Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the River Danube. ... Combatants Soviet Union ÁVH Hungarian government, various nationalist militias Commanders Yuri Andropov Pál Maléter, Béla Király, Gergely Pongrátz, József Dudás Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks 100,000+ demonstrators (some later armed), unknown number of soldiers Casualties 720 killed according to official... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... The effervescent swimming pool in Gellért Baths Gellért Thermal Baths and Swimming Pool, also called Gellért fürdÅ‘ or Gellért Baths, is one of the most beautiful and most elegant baths in Budapest, built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sashegy (lit. ... Gellérthegy is part of Budapest’s XI District, and is mainly centred around the eponymous Gellérthegy (Gellert Hill), named after the saint thrown to his death from the hill (by?). The famous Gellert Hotel can be found in Gellert Square in the areas eastern stretches. ... Naphegy (Sun Hill, literally: Sun Mountain) is a historic part of Krisztinaváros, near to old Tabán in the District I. of Budapest, Hungary. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Gellérthegy is part of Budapest’s XI District, and is mainly centred around the eponymous Gellérthegy (Gellert Hill), named after the saint thrown to his death from the hill (by?). The famous Gellert Hotel can be found in Gellert Square in the areas eastern stretches. ... Naphegy (Sun Hill, literally: Sun Mountain) is a historic part of Krisztinaváros, near to old Tabán in the District I. of Budapest, Hungary. ... Sashegy (lit. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ...

Sights and historic places

(The below sights are grouped by location.)

Andrássy Avenue or Andrássy út (lit. ... Hungarian State Opera House Interior The Opera House on the left side (1896) The building of the Hungarian State Opera House (Hungarian: Magyar Állami Operaház) is a splendid example of neorenaissaince architecture. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The District Map of Budapest Bauhaus in Budapest was clearly a dominant tendency between 1930 and 1948: large residential buildings, cinemas, churches and even an airport was built in this style. ... Pasarét Pasarét is a villa-ghetto in Buda. ... Újlipótváros is a neighbourhood in the 13th district of Budapest, Hungary. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... The library (in Hungarian: Országos Széchényi Könyvtár (OSZK)) is located in Budapest; it is the national library of Hungary. ... Matthias Church Matthias Church or Mátyás-templom located in Budapest, Hungary at the heart of Budas Castle District. ... The plague Column of the Virgin Mary Immaculate in Kutná Hora, the Czech Republic, built between 1713 and 1715 Erecting religious monuments in the form of a column surmounted by a figure or a Christian symbol was a gesture of public faith that flourished in the Catholic countries of Europe... The Halászbástya of Fishermens Bastion is a terrace in neo-gothic style situated on the Buda bank of the the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. ... Vajdahunyad Castle in Városliget Városliget or City Park is a public park (302 acres or 1. ... Exterior The Széchenyi Medicinal Bath in Budapest (Széchenyi-gyógyfürdÅ‘) is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. ... Vajdahunyad Castle, Budapest For the castle in present-day Hunedoara, Romania, see Castle of Vajdahunyad. ... TimeWheel is the worlds largest hourglass. ... Theme park redirects here. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... The Danube Promenade in Budapest, goes from Széchenyi Chain Bridge, to Erzsébet Bridge. ... Vigadó (usually translated as Place for Merriment) is located on the left side of the Danube in Budapest, Hungary. ... Ferenciek tere square is a station on the M3 (North-South) line of the Budapest Metro. ... Erzsébet híd in the foreground, seen from Gellért Hill Erzsébet híd, Erzsébet Bridge or Elisabeth Bridge is the second newest bridge and one of the most elegant ones of Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the River Danube. ... The New Academy, facing Ferenc Liszt Square The Franz Liszt Academy of Music (in Hungarian: Liszt Ferenc Zeneművészeti Egyetem or simply Zeneakadémia, Music Academy) is a concert hall and a music university in Budapest, Hungary, founded by pianist and composer Franz Liszt on November 14, 1875. ... The effervescent swimming pool in Gellért Baths Gellért Thermal Baths and Swimming Pool, also called Gellért fürdÅ‘ or Gellért Baths, is one of the most beautiful and most elegant baths in Budapest, built in 1918 in Art Nouveau style. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The main entrance to the cave, as viewed from the Danube waterfront The Gellért Hill Cave (Gellérthegyi-barlang in Hungarian) is part of a network of caves within Gellért Hill in Budapest, Hungary. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... For other freedom monuments, see Monument of Liberty. ... The Geological Museum of Budapest is the main museum on geology in Hungary. ... The Great Market in Budapest The Great Market Hall or the Central Market Hall (Hungarian Nagycsarnok), on FÅ‘vám Tér in the 9th district, is the largest indoor market in Budapest. ... Szabadság híd or Liberty Bridge (sometimes Freedom Bridge) is a bridge in Budapest, Hungary, connecting Buda and Pest across the River Danube. ... Heroes Square – overview Heroes Square has statues representing the founders of the Magyar nation 1100 years ago Palace of Art Heroes Square (HÅ‘sök tere in Hungarian) is a large plaza in Budapest, Hungary. ... Palace of Art, overview Palace of Art, main entrance The Hall of Art or Palace of Art (Műcsarnok in Hungarian) is an art museum in Budapest, located in Heroes Square, facing the Museum of Fine Arts. ... The museums entrance The Museum of Fine Arts (Hungarian: Szépművészeti Múzeum) is a museum in Heroes Square, Budapest, Hungary, facing the Palace of Art. ... The Water Tower, a famous landmark on Margaret Island. ... This view from the Symbolic Mountain Lookout in Cowra, NSW shows many of the typical elements of a Japanese garden Stone lantern amid plants. ... A musical fountain is a type of animated fountain for entertainment purposes that creates an aesthetic design and a three-dimensional image. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Museum of Applied Arts is a museum in Budapest, Hungary. ... // The Hungarian National Museum is said to have been founded in 1802 when Count Ferenc Széchényi set up the National Széchényi Library. ... ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Óbuda (sometimes written in English as Obuda) was a historical city in Hungary. ... The interior of the Palace of Arts The Palace of Arts is a building in Ferencváros, Budapest, Hungary, officially opened in March 2005. ... The National Theatre of Hungary is found in Budapest. ... Hungarian Parliament The Parliament from above Grand Stairwell Conference Hall The Hungarian Parliament Building (Hungarian: ) is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of the Europes oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. ... Saint Stephen I (Hungarian: , Latin: , Slovak: , German: ; Esztergom, c. ... The Holy Crown of Hungary, also known as the Crown of St. ... Kossuth Memorial is an imposing statue of former Hungarian Regent-President Lajos Kossuth in front of the Hungarian Parliament Building on Lajos Kossuth Square in Budapest. ... Hungarian Parliament Building Museum of Ethnography Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development Kossuth Lajos tér (in English: Lajos Kossuth Square, in short: Kossuth tér) is situated less than a kilometre north of the Inner City of Budapest, on the bank of the Danube. ... Attila József The native form of this personal name is József Attila. ... Imre Nagy. ... St Stephens Basilica (Szent István-bazilika in Hungarian) is an ecclesiastic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. ... Sashegy (lit. ... Shoes on the Danube Promenade is the work of sculptor Gyula Pauer [[2]]. Budapest, Danube Promenade Memorial in Budapest near to the Hungarian Academy of Sciences on the Danube Promenade. ... Statue of Marx and Engels. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... The Hungarian Academy of Sciences (in short: HAS, in Hungarian: Magyar Tudományos Akadémia) was founded in 1825, when Count István Széchenyi offered one years income of his estate for the purposes of a Learned Society at a district session of the Diet in Bratislava (seat... Gresham Palace or Gresham Palota is acclaimed as one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture in Central Europe. ... A statue of Gül Baba outside his mausoleum in Budapest. ... Women operating a scam on Váci utca. ... Statue of Mihály Vörösmarty on the square named after him Gerbeaud Café on Vörösmarty square Vörösmarty tér or Vörösmarty square is a small but popular square in the Budapest city centre at the northern end of Váci utca. ... Nyugati railway station Its old ticket hall Nyugati pályaudvar or Western Railway Station in the northern part of the old town of Budapest. ... Erzsébetváros is the seventh district of Budapest, situated on the Pest side of the Danube. ...

Media portrayals

Films

  • The witness (1969)
  • She loves me (1978)
  • The borrowed castle (1937)
  • The shop around the corner (1940)
  • Alla ricerca di Tadzio (1970)
  • The Amazing Race (2001)
  • Kontroll (2003)
  • The Garden of Eden (1928)
  • Forest (2003)
  • Perlasca. Un eroe italiano (2002)
  • The Matador (2005)
  • Music Box (1989)
  • An American Rhapsody (2001)
  • God afton, Herr Wallenberg - En Passionshistoria från verkligheten (1990)
  • The Baroness and the Butler (1938)
  • Stop Mom Therese! (2004)
  • Assignment: Paris (1952)
  • The Beast of Budapest (1958)
  • Den of Lions (2003)
  • Contaminated Man (2000)
  • Dracula (2002)
  • The Process (2005)
  • Yellow Lily (1928)
  • Horizont (1971)
  • Ultra (2003)
  • Magical Klezmer (2004)
  • Budapest to Bamako (2007)
  • A Cafe in the Sky (2004)
  • Silken Shackles (1926)
  • A Time for Márai (2005)
  • Perlasca (1993)

Literature

Shopping

Váci Utca, the main shopping street catering to tourists
Váci Utca, the main shopping street catering to tourists
Deák-mansion in Fashion Street
Deák-mansion in Fashion Street

Unique traditional folk art items to look for in the Inner City and the Castle Quarter[25]: ceramics, embroideries, painted eggs, dolls in folk costume, hand-painted Herend and Zsolnay porcelain, crystal and Halas lace. Food: red paprika in gift boxes, goose liver, traditional salami. Spirits: apricot and plum brandy, Hungarian liqueur, famous regional wines (Tokaji, Badacsonyi, Egri). Other: cosmetic products and art books. Shops are usually open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. Shopping centers on weekdays are open till 8 p.m. and most of them are also open on Sundays. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 473 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (650 × 824 pixel, file size: 108 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 473 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (650 × 824 pixel, file size: 108 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Location of the historical Inner City within Budapest Váci utca - shopping street Szabad sajtó út near Ferenciek tere The Inner City (Hungarian: Belváros) in its narrow, historical sense forms the southern half of District 5 of Budapest and it is located in the centre of the city. ...


The Castle Quarter (or District) is the place to buy antiques and folk art items at the small shops and on the streets. The House of Hungarian Wines has an enormous selection of wine from the historical Hungarian wine regions. Hungarian wine has a history dating back to at least Roman times, and that history reflects the countrys position between the Slavs and the Germanic peoples. ...


The Great Market Hall is a large and rich indoor market, and a major tourist attraction. Built in 1890, it is the city's "pantry", a vast repository of Hungaricums such as paprika, brandy (pálinka), goose-liver (libamáj) and a wide variety of traditional sausages and salamis seasoned with paprika. The Great Market in Budapest The Great Market Hall or the Central Market Hall (Hungarian Nagycsarnok), on FÅ‘vám Tér in the 9th district, is the largest indoor market in Budapest. ... Hungarian or Magyar cuisine is the cuisine characteristic to Hungary and the Magyars. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... Pálinka is a traditional type of brandy that is produced in Hungary and Transylvania (region of Romania). ...


One part of the main pedestrian shopping street, Váci utca (street) begins on the opposite side of the Great Market Hall, at the foot of Liberty (Szabadság) bridge. The other part continues through the underpass at the entrance of Elisabeth Bridge and leads to Vörösmarty tér (Square). Several antique and folklore shops, galleries, designer boutiques, foreign-language book-shops, jewelry and wine-shops, restaurants, and cafés can be found on the neighboring streets. On Kígyó utca the two finest porcelain shops face each other. The Herend and the Zsolnay porcelain shops sell Hungary's most precious hand painted porcelain vases figures and dinner services. Women operating a scam on Váci utca. ...


The antique shopping street, Falk Miksa utca, runs from Szt. Istvan Blvd. to the Parliament. The shops offer the richest collection of antiques in Central Europe.


The Ecseri Flea Market in the 9th district has many treasures for collectors, browsers and anyone looking for an unusual souvenir to take home.


There are shopping malls at major intersections and metro stations throughout the city. The Westend City Center (next to Western Railway Station), one of the largest shopping centres in Central and Eastern Europe with its 400 shops, a 14-screen cinema complex, entertainment center and a huge food-court, is changing the cityscape. The second Hilton hotel in Hungary, the Hilton Budapest Westend, is integrated in the mega-complex. On the roof, a tethered balloon gives a view of the city. Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ...


On the Buda side, two new shopping complexes opened one after the other: MAMMUT shopping center at Széna square (along Margaret Blvd.) has more than 300 shops on 7 levels in two buildings connected with a covered bridge. The center also houses several restaurants, an entertainment center, fitness facilities and a health center. The other is MOM PARK with 70 shops, a restaurant and cinema (11th district, Attila út) is the newest shopping and entertainment center of the City[26].


Transportation

Airport

Budapest Ferihegy International Airport, which has 3 different passenger terminals: Ferihegy 1, which tends to serve the many discount airlines now flying to and from Budapest, Ferihegy 2/A and Ferihegy 2/B. Terminal 2/C is planned to be built. The airport is located to the east of the centre in the XVIII. district in Pestszentlőrinc. Malév (Hungarian Airlines) began to change its aircraft in 2003, and by 2005 owned the most modern fleet in Europe. Aerial view of Ferihegy Ferihegy control tower Budapest Ferihegy International Airport (Hungarian: Ferihegyi Nemzetközi RepülÅ‘tér or simply Ferihegy) (IATA: BUD, ICAO: LHBP) is the international airport serving the capital city of Budapest, and the largest of the countrys five international airports. ... Boeing 737-700 of UK low cost carrier easyJet waiting for take off at Bristol Image:SWA737-700. ... PestszentlÅ‘rinc, the 18th district of Budapest is situated at the south-eastern part of the city. ... Malév Hungarian Airlines, a translation of the Hungarian Magyar Légiközlekedési Vállalat, is the national airline of Hungary. ...


Roads

Budapest is the most important Hungarian road terminus; all the major highways end there. Between, the city Street names were reverted from the names given under Soviet occupation back to their late-19th century names. Budapest is also a major railway terminus. Abbey Road in London A street name or odonym is an identifying name given to a street. ... Terminal Station was also the name of a railway station in Chattanooga, Tennessee; see Chattanooga Choo Choo. ...


Ring road M0 around Budapest is currently under construction. A beltway (American English), ring road or orbital motorway (British English) is a circumferential highway found around many cities. ... Schematic path of Motorway M0 The M0 motorway is a ringroad around Budapest, the capital of Hungary. ...


Commuting with public transport

Map of the Budapest Metro
Map of the Budapest Metro

Budapest public transport is well covered with services provided by BKV, the company operates buses, trolleybuses, trams, suburban railway lines, the metro, boats and many other special vehicles. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 81-717 type train The Budapest Metro (Hungarian: budapesti metró) is the metro system in the Hungarian capital Budapest. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... BKV – the abbreviation BKV stands for its earlier name Budapesti Közlekedési Vállalat; Mass Transport Company of Budapest) is the unified public transport company of the city of Budapest, the capital of Hungary. ... Autobus redirects here. ... Further information: electric bus A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... 81-717 type train The Budapest Metro (Hungarian: budapesti metró) is the metro system in the Hungarian capital Budapest. ...


Budapest's tram network is extensive, and reliable despite poor track infrastructure and an ageing fleet. Routes 4 and 6 combined form the busiest traditional city tram line in the world, with 50-metre (164 ft) long brand-new Siemens Combino trams running at 60 to 90 second intervals at peak time and 3-4 minutes off-peak and usually packed with people. Siemens has the following uses: Siemens is a German family name carried by generations of the telecommunications industrialists, including Werner von Siemens, Sir William Siemens, Wilhelm von Siemens and Peter von Siemens Siemens AG is a German electrical and telecommunications company, founded as a telegraph equipment manufacturer by Werner von... Combino Tram in Basel Combino tram in PoznaÅ„ on PST line Combino D1 class in Melbourne The Combino is a low floor tram produced by Siemens Transportation Systems (formerly Duewag). ...


Day services operate from 4:30 a.m. until 11:30 p.m. each day. Night traffic (a reduced overnight service) is outstandingly good.


There are three metro lines and a fourth is currently under construction. The Yellow line, built in 1896, is one of the oldest subway lines in the world, following only the early lines of the London Underground. “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ...


The city of Budapest proves that it is the frequency and quality of public transport services which attract people to use it, given the systems reliability and extensive coverage across the city. The city is currently updating and replacing its entire fleet.


Commuting with public transport

Map of the Budapest Metro
Map of the Budapest Metro

Budapest public transport is well covered with services provided by BKV, the company operates buses, trolleybuses, trams, suburban railway lines, the metro, boats and many other special vehicles. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 81-717 type train The Budapest Metro (Hungarian: budapesti metró) is the metro system in the Hungarian capital Budapest. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... BKV – the abbreviation BKV stands for its earlier name Budapesti Közlekedési Vállalat; Mass Transport Company of Budapest) is the unified public transport company of the city of Budapest, the capital of Hungary. ... Autobus redirects here. ... Further information: electric bus A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... 81-717 type train The Budapest Metro (Hungarian: budapesti metró) is the metro system in the Hungarian capital Budapest. ...


Budapest's tram network is extensive, and reliable despite poor track infrastructure and an ageing fleet. Routes 4 and 6 combined form the busiest traditional city tram line in the world, with 50-metre (164 ft) long brand-new Siemens Combino trams running at 60 to 90 second intervals at peak time and 3-4 minutes off-peak and usually packed with people. Siemens has the following uses: Siemens is a German family name carried by generations of the telecommunications industrialists, including Werner von Siemens, Sir William Siemens, Wilhelm von Siemens and Peter von Siemens Siemens AG is a German electrical and telecommunications company, founded as a telegraph equipment manufacturer by Werner von... Combino Tram in Basel Combino tram in PoznaÅ„ on PST line Combino D1 class in Melbourne The Combino is a low floor tram produced by Siemens Transportation Systems (formerly Duewag). ...


Day services operate from 4:30 a.m. until 11:30 p.m. each day. Night traffic (a reduced overnight service) is outstandingly good.


There are three metro lines and a fourth is currently under construction. The Yellow line, built in 1896, is one of the oldest subway lines in the world, following only the early lines of the London Underground. “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ...


The city of Budapest proves that it is the frequency and quality of public transport services which attract people to use it, given the systems reliability and extensive coverage across the city. The city is currently updating and replacing its entire fleet.


Special vehicles

MÁV's Siemens Desiro in Budapest-Esztergom
MÁV's Siemens Desiro in Budapest-Esztergom

Beside metros, suburban rails, buses, trams and boats, there are a couple of less usual vehicles in Budapest: Image File history File links Troli_pic06_large. ... Image File history File links Troli_pic06_large. ... Further information: electric bus A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 383 pixelsFull resolution (2271 × 1088 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) MÁVs Siemens Desiro in Esztergom, Hungary (Own work, uploaded from huwiki, cropped) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 383 pixelsFull resolution (2271 × 1088 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) MÁVs Siemens Desiro in Esztergom, Hungary (Own work, uploaded from huwiki, cropped) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this... Basilica in Esztergom. ... HÉV carriages near Szentendre HÉV is the name of the four suburban railways in and around Budapest. ...

The latter three vehicles run among Buda hills Further information: electric bus A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... Pest (in Slovak Pešť, pron. ... Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of... Looking down the line, with the Széchenyi Chain Bridge in the background Looking up the line, showing the distinctive foot bridges The Budapest Castle Hill Funicular or Budavári Sikló is a funicular railway in the city of Budapest, in Hungary. ... Széchenyi Lánchíd by night Széchenyi Lánchíd or Széchenyi Chain Bridge is one of the most famous bridges of Budapest, Hungary. ... Buda Castle (Hungarian: Budai Vár, Turkish: Budin Kalesi) is the historical castle of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, Hungary. ... Cyclecars were small, generally inexpensive cars manufactured mainly between 1910 and 1923. ... The Water Tower, a famous landmark on Margaret Island. ... Hunter Mountain chairlift A chairlift in Bad Hofgastein, Austria A chairlift (technically, an elevated passenger ropeway), is a type of aerial lift, which consists of a continuously circulating steel cable loop strung between two end terminals and usually over intermediate towers, carrying a series of chairs. ... Rack railway track using Von Roll system rack. ... The Budapest Cog-wheel Railway is a rack railway running in Budapest, Hungary. ... MaltaÅ„ska Kolej DzieciÄ™ca (Maltan Childrens Railway) in PoznaÅ„, Poland (600mm gauge) Steam Locomotive on Kyiv Childrens Railway, Ukraine (750mm gauge) A childrens railway is an extracurricular educational institution, where teenagers learn railway professions. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ...

Railway

Main articles: MÁV and HÉV
Budapest Keleti (Eastbound) Railway Station
Budapest Keleti (Eastbound) Railway Station

Hungarian main-line railways are operated by MÁV. There are three main railway termini in Budapest, Keleti (eastern), Nyugati (westbound), and Déli (southbound), operating both domestic and international rail services. Budapest was one of the main stops of the Orient Express until 2001, when the service was cut back to Paris-Vienna. Budapest Keleti Station. ... HÉV carriages near Szentendre HÉV is the name of the four suburban railways in and around Budapest. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 823 KB)Keleti station in Budapest, Hungary (one of the three main stations in the city). ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 823 KB)Keleti station in Budapest, Hungary (one of the three main stations in the city). ... Eastern Railway Station in Budapest. ... Keleti pályaudvar (Eastern Station) is the largest railway station in Budapest. ... Nyugati pályaudvar or Western Railway Station in the northen part of the old town of Budapest. ... Déli pályaudvar is the third largest railway station of Budapest. ... Poster advertising the Orient Express Orient Express is the name of a long-distance passenger train originally operated by the Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits. ...


There is also a suburban rail service in and around Budapest, operated under the name HÉV. A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... HÉV carriages near Szentendre HÉV is the name of the four suburban railways in and around Budapest. ...


Waterways

The river Danube flows through Budapest on its way to the Black Sea. The river is easily navigable and so Budapest has historically been a major commercial port (at Csepel). In the summer months a scheduled hydrofoil service operates up the Danube to Vienna. This article is about the Danube River. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Csepel is District XXI of Budapest, in the south. ...


International schools

Many embassies and transnational companies are located in Budapest. They bring many expatriate foreigners and their families to town, creating demand for private and international schools. These schools are usually quite expensive and are attended by the expatriates as well as some richer Hungarians. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with transnationalism. ...


International schools:

Central European University is a US-licensed and accredited university based in Budapest, Hungary. ... McDaniel College is liberal arts college in Westminster, Maryland, located 30 miles northwest of Baltimore, with a branch college in Budapest, Hungary. ... The American International School of Budapest (or AISB) is an international school located in Budapest, Hungary. ... Thomas Mann Gymnasium Thomas Mann Gymnasium is a German Auslandsschule (German independent schools in foreign countries) in Budapest. ... International Business School can refer to a number of institutions around the world, some of which are listed below: Isle of Man International Business School International Business School - Budapest in Budapest [1] This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (December 15, 1832 – December 27, 1923; French pronunciation in IPA, in English usually pronounced ) was a French structural engineer and architect and a specialist of metallic structures. ...

Sister cities

These are the official sister cities of Budapest[27][28]:

Flag of Germany Berlin, Germany (1992)
Flag of Ireland Dublin, Ireland (2006)
Flag of Germany Frankfurt, Germany (1990)
Flag of the United States Fort Worth, United States (1990)
Flag of Portugal Lisbon, Portugal (1992)
Flag of Croatia Zagreb, Croatia (1994)
Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant, Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City 298. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - Total 641. ...

Flag of the United States New York City, United States (1991)
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1995)
Flag of Israel Tel Aviv, Israel (1989)
Flag of Austria Vienna, Austria (1990)
Flag of Slovakia Košice, Slovakia (partner city) Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Location of KoÅ¡ice in Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Slovakia Region KoÅ¡ice Region Districts KoÅ¡ice I-IV City parts First mentioned 1230 Government  - Type City Council  - Mayor FrantiÅ¡ek Knapík Area  - City 243. ...

Flag of South Korea Daejeon, South Korea (1994)
Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of South Korea highlighting the city. ...


Some of the city's districts are also twinned to small cities or districts of other big cities, for details see the article List of districts and towns in Budapest. Currently the capital city of Budapest has 23 districts, each with its own local government. ...


Gallery

References

  1. ^ Hungarian Central Statistical Office homepage Accessed July 13, 2007
  2. ^ http://portal.ksh.hu/portal/page?_pageid=37,412178&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL#sett/ Települések/Agglomerációk, 2005
  3. ^ http://www.escapeartist.com/efam3/Budapest_Expats.html
  4. ^ http://www.iht.com/articles/2004/08/04/trbuda_ed3_.php
  5. ^ http://www.world66.com/europe/hungary/budapest
  6. ^ http://whc.unesco.org/en/news/156
  7. ^ http://www.tobook.com/CityGuide/Budapest
  8. ^ http://www.europeanrailguide.com/destinationguides/budapest/
  9. ^ http://incentraleurope.radio.cz/ice/article/75758
  10. ^ http://www.budapesthotelreservation.hu/articles/gellert_bath_in_top_3.EN.php
  11. ^ http://www.eniac.eu/web/events/for2007_location.php
  12. ^ http://www.budapest-tourist-guide.com/budapest-parliament.html
  13. ^ http://www.smilesavershungary.co.uk/Site/gettingthere.asp?GettingThere=sights
  14. ^ http://www.fsz.bme.hu/hungary/budapest/bphist/bphist02.htm
  15. ^ http://www.fsz.bme.hu/hungary/budapest/bphist/bphist03.htm
  16. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  17. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  18. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  19. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  20. ^ http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005264
  21. ^ http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005264
  22. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  23. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  24. ^ http://www.budapest.com/history.html
  25. ^ http://www.gotohungary.com/whattodo/shopping.shtml
  26. ^ http://www.gotohungary.com/whattodo/shopping.shtml
  27. ^ Sister cities on the homepage of Budapest
  28. ^ Interview with mayor candidates before election in Hungarian

Bibliography

  • DK Publishing, Budapest: Eyewitness Travel Guildes. DK Travel, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0756624354
  • Annabel Barber, Visible Cities Budapest: A City Guide. Somerset, Ltd., 2004. ISBN-13: 978-9632129860
  • Krisztian Ungvary (Author), John Lukacs (Foreword), The Siege of Budapest: One Hundred Days in World War II. Yale University Press, 2006. ISBN-13: 978-0300119855

See also

The District Map of Budapest Bauhaus in Budapest was clearly a dominant tendency between 1930 and 1948: large residential buildings, cinemas, churches and even an airport was built in this style. ... Budapest is the capital and largest city of Hungary; it has long been an important part of the music of Hungary. ... This is a list of cemeteries in Budapest. ... The Urban and Suburban Transit Association (VEKE) (Hungarian: Városi és Elővárosi Közlekedési Egyesület) is a Hungarian non-profit organization, aimed at developing city transport in Hungary. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Budapest
Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Budapest.
Budapest Portal
  • Official homepage
  • Budapest Tourist Office
  • Public transport in Budapest
  • Budapest tourism map and Budapest pictures
  • Budapest travel guide from Wikitravel
Budapest in the European Union

Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... This article is about the Danube River. ... map of Serbia Serbia is located in the Balkans (a historical and geographical region of southeastern Europe) and in the Pannonian Plain (a region of central Europe). ... Image File history File links Danubemap. ... Donaueschingen is a city in the southwest of Baden-Württemberg in the Schwarzwald-Baar District. ... For other uses, see Ulm (disambiguation). ... Ingolstadt (Austro-Bavarian: InglstÃ¥dt) is a city in the Free State of Bavaria, Germany. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... Passau (Latin: Batavis or Batavia, also Passavium; Italian: Passavia; Czech: Pasov) is a town in Niederbayern, Eastern Bavaria, Germany, known also as the Dreiflüssestadt (City of Three Rivers), because the Danube River is joined there by the Inn River from the South, and the Ilz River coming out of... For the town in Germany, see Linz am Rhein. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location of Bratislava within Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Region Districts Bratislava I-V City subdivisions 17 city boroughs Cadastral areas 20 cadastral areas First mentioned 907 Government  - Type City council  - Mayor (Primátor) Andrej ÄŽurkovský  - Headquarters Primates Palace Area [1]  - City 367. ... Raab redirects here. ... Komárom is a city in Hungary on the right bank of the Danube in Komárom-Esztergom county. ... Komárno (Hungarian: Komárom [today a separate town, also nonofficial Révkomárom], German: Komorn) is a town in Slovakia at the Danube and the Váh rivers. ... Basilica in Esztergom. ... Baja (IPA: ) is a city in southern Hungary. ... Vukovars main street Vukovar Vukovar (Serbian: Вуковар, Croatian: Vukovar, Hungarian: Vukovár) is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river into the Danube. ... For other uses, see Novi Sad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Location of Smederevo within Serbia Coordinates: , Country District Settlements 27 Government  - Mayor SaÅ¡a Radosavljević (DSS) Area [2]  - Municipality 484 km² (186. ... County Status County capital Mayor Dinu Constantin, Social Democratic Party, since 2004 Area 55 km² Population (2002) 104,557 (2002 census) 109,450 (as of July 1, 2004)[1] Density 1900 inh/km² Geographical coordinates Web site http://www. ... Calafat is a town in Dolj county, Romania, on the river Danube, opposite the Bulgarian city of Vidin. ... Vidin (Bulgarian: Видин; Romanian: Vidin, Diiu) is a town on the southern bank of the Danube in northwestern Bulgaria. ... County Giurgiu County Status County capital Mayor Lucian Iliescu, National Liberal Party, since 2000 Population (2002) 73,586 Geographical coordinates , Web site http://www. ... Dohodno Zdanie is a theatre building which is considered a symbol of the city Rousse (also transliterated as Ruse or Russe; Bulgarian: ; formerly also Rustchuk) is the fifth-largest city in Bulgaria, with a population of 176,115. ... Location of Cernavodă Coordinates: , Country County Status Town Government  - Mayor Hansa Gheorghe (National Liberal Party) Area  - Town 46. ... County Status County capital Mayor Constantin Sever Cibu, National Liberal Party, since 2004 Area 33. ... County Status County capital Mayor Dumitru Nicolae, Social Democratic Party, since 2000 Area 246. ... County Tulcea County Status County capital Mayor Constantin Hogea, Democratic Party , since 2004 Population (2002) 91,875 Geographical coordinates , Web site http://www. ... County Tulcea County Status Town Mayor Aurel Dimitriu, Social Democratic Party, since 2004 Area 14. ... This is a list of tributaries of the Danube by order of entrance. ... The Iller (ancient name Hilaria) is a river in Bavaria, Germany. ... The river Lech, in the background the city of Landsberg The river Lech in Augsburg The Lech (Licus, Licca) is a river in Austria and Germany. ... The Regen is a river in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Isar is the third largest river in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Inn is a river in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. ... There are several European rivers called Morava: Morava river, Central Europe Morava rivers, Serbia Morava is also the Czech and Slovak name for Moravia, the eastern part of the Czech Republic. ... The Váh near PieÅ¡Å¥any. ... Hron (Hungarian: Garam, German: Gran) is a 298 km long left tributary of the Danube and the second longest river in Slovakia. ... Ipeľ (-Slovak, Hungarian: Ipoly, German: Eipel) is a 232 km long river in Slovakia and Hungary, tributary to the river Danube. ... The Drava at Drávaszabolcs, Hungary The Drava at Vízvár, Hungary The Drava at Maribor, Slovenia Drava or Drave (German: Drau, Slovenian, Croatian and Italian: Drava, Hungarian: Dráva) is a river in southern Central Europe, a tributary of the Danube. ... The Tisza or Tisa is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. ... For other uses of this word, see Sava (disambiguation). ... The TimiÅŸ river (Hungarian: Temes, Serbian: TamiÅ¡) is a river rising in the Semenic Mountains, southern Carpathian Mountains, CaraÅŸ-Severin county, Romania. ... The Velika Morava or Great Morava (Serbian Cyrillic: Велика Морава) is a final section of the Morava (Cyrillic: Морава), the major river system in Serbia. ... This article is about the Romanian river Jiu. ... The Iskar (Bulgarian: Искър; Latin Oescus) is the longest river in Bulgaria, a right tributary of the Danube. ... The Olt (Romanian and Hungarian; in German: Alt; in Latin: Aluta) is a river in Romania. ... Yantra is a river in Bulgaria. ... The Vedea is a river in the southern part of Romania that rises from the Cotmeana Plateau and runs into the Danube, having a total length of 224 km, of which on 33 km the river is regulated. ... ArgeÅŸ is a river of Southern Romania, which rises from the FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, in the Carpathians and flows into the Danube. ... IalomiÅ£a (Râul IalomiÅ£a in Romanian) is a river of Southern Romania, which rises from the Bucegi Mountains, in the Carpathians and flows into the Danube. ... The Siret River is a river that rises from the Carpathians in the Northern Bukovina region of the Ukraine, flows southward into Romania for 470 km before it joins Danube. ... Length 953  km Elevation of the source -  m Average discharge -  m³/s Area watershed 27,500  km² Origin  Ukraine Mouth  Danube Basin countries Ukraine, Romania, Moldova The Prut, or Pruth river (Ukrainian: Прут) is 953 km long, originating in the Carpathian Mountains in Ukraine and flowing southeast to join the Danube...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Budapest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2551 words)
Budapest (pronounced [ˈbuːdəˌpɛst] or [ˌbuːdəˈpɛst], Hungarian [ˈbʊdɑpɛʃt]) is the capital city of Hungary and the country's principal political, cultural, commercial, industrial and transportation center.
Budapest's recorded history begins with the Roman town of Aquincum, founded around 89 AD on the site of an earlier Celtic settlement near what was to become Óbuda, and from 106 until the end of the 4th century the capital of the province of lower Pannonia.
Zoltán Kocsis born in 1952 in Budapest, pianist
Budapest. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (662 words)
Budapest was formed in 1873 by the union of Buda (Ger.
In Nov., 1919, Budapest was seized by forces of Admiral Horthy, who in Mar., 1920, was proclaimed regent of Hungary.
Budapest was the center of a popular uprising against the Hungarian Communist regime in Oct.–Nov., 1956 (see Hungary).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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