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Encyclopedia > Bud Selig

Allan Huber "Bud" Selig, Jr. (born July 30, 1934 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is the Commissioner of Major League Baseball (MLB). He was previously the team owner and administrator of the Milwaukee Brewers. On August 21, 2004, Selig's contract was extended by the MLB through 2009, at which point he plans to retire.[1] Selig, a Jewish-American, is a resident of Milwaukee. Before entering baseball, he worked for his father who owned a car leasing business in Milwaukee. is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2004 throughout the world. ...

Contents

Early life

As a young man, Selig watched the Milwaukee Brewers, a minor-league affiliate of the Chicago Cubs of the National League. Bud soon became a Braves fan when the National League franchise moved to his home town of Milwaukee from Boston in 1953. Selig became the team's largest public stockholder. Selig was heartbroken and devastated when he learned that the Braves were going to leave Milwaukee in favor of Atlanta. In 1965, when the Braves left Milwaukee, he divested his stock in the team. Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 19, 34, 42, 44 Name Milwaukee Brewers (1970–present) Seattle Pilots (1969) Other nicknames True Blue Brew Crew, The Brew Crew, The Crew, Beermakers Ballpark Miller Park (2001–present) County Stadium (1970–2000) Sick... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... “Boston” redirects here. ... The following are the events of the year 1953 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1965 throughout the world. ...


Milwaukee Brewers owner

See also: Milwaukee Braves#Milwaukee

As a minority owner of the Milwaukee Braves, Selig founded the organization Teams, Inc, in an attempt to prevent the majority owners (based out of Chicago) from moving the club to a larger television market. When his quest to keep the team in Milwaukee finally failed after the 1965 season, he changed the group's name to Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club, Inc., after the minor league baseball team he grew up watching, and devoted himself to returning Major League Baseball to Milwaukee. The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... The following are the baseball events of the year 1965 throughout the world. ... 1947 Milwaukee Brewers scorecard The Milwaukee Brewers were a Minor League Baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ...


Selig arranged for major league games to be played at the now-vacant Milwaukee County Stadium. The first, a pre-season match between the Chicago White Sox and Minnesota Twins, drew more than 51,000 spectators. Selig followed this up by hosting nine White Sox regular-season games in 1968 and eleven in 1969. Those Milwaukee "home" games were phenomenally successful, with the handful of games accounting for about one-third of total White Sox home attendance. Clearly, Milwaukee was hungry for baseball. Milwaukee County Stadium (locally known as just County Stadium) was a ballpark in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1953 to 2000. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... The following are the baseball events of the year 1968 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1969 throughout the world. ...


To satisfy that fanbase, Selig decided to purchase the White Sox (with the intention of moving them to Milwaukee) in 1969. He entered into an agreement to buy the club, but the American League vetoed the sale, preferring to keep an American League team in Chicago to compete with the crosstown Cubs. Selig turned his attention to other franchises. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ...


In 1970, he purchased the bankrupt Seattle Pilots franchise, moving them to his hometown and officially renaming the team the Brewers. The following are the baseball events of the year 1970 throughout the world. ...


During Selig's tenure as club president, the Brewers appeared in the 1982 World Series (under the leadership of future Hall of Famers Robin Yount and Paul Molitor) but have failed to make another appearance in the postseason since. Under Selig's watch, the Brewers also won seven Organization of the Year awards. Selig was part of owner's collusion in 1985-1987, resulting in the owners paying $280 million in damages to the players. The 1982 World Series matched the St. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Robin Rachel Yount (born September 16, 1955 in Danville, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the Milwaukee Brewers (1974-1994). ... Reverse side of a Paul Molitor baseball card Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956 in St. ... Baseball collusion refers to baseball owners working together to avoid competitive bidding for player services or player jointly negotiating with team owners. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 7 - Outfielder Lou Brock and knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 14 - Catfish Hunter and Billy Williams are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... USD redirects here. ...


Upon his assumption of the commissioner's role, Selig transferred his ownership interest in the Brewers to his daughter Wendy Selig-Prieb in order to remove any technical conflicts of interest, though it was widely presumed he maintained some hand in team operations. Although the team has been sold to Los Angeles investor Mark Attanasio, questions remain regarding Selig's past involvement. Selig's defenders point to the poor management of the team after Selig-Prieb took control as proof that Selig was not working behind the scenes. Wendy Selig-Prieb is the former CEO of the Milwaukee Brewers team in Major League Baseball, having served in that position from 1998 to 2004, during which time she was Major League Baseballs only female CEO. Her father Bud Selig is the commissioner of baseball and, until 1998, owner... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Mark L. Attanasio is a Los Angeles investment banker who, in September of 2004, reached a deal to purchase the Milwaukee Brewers from Major League Baseball (MLB) commissioner Bud Selig for US$180 million. ...


Selig has long been considered a hero by baseball fans in Milwaukee, and while such enthusiasm ebbed somewhat during the failed management term of his daughter, Selig is still recognized for all that he as done for baseball and its presence in Milwaukee. In particular, Selig is famous for his lunches at Gilles Frozen Custard, a well-known hotdog and custard stand not far from Miller Park in Milwaukee. Gilles Frozen Custard is the oldest frozen custard stand in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, dating back to 1938. ... Miller Park is a baseball stadium located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ...


Acting Commissioner

Selig became an increasingly vocal opponent of Commissioner Fay Vincent, and soon became the leader of a group of owners seeking his removal. Selig has never admitted that the owners colluded, while Vincent did. Said Vincent, Francis Thomas Fay Vincent, Jr. ... Baseball collusion refers to baseball owners working together to avoid competitive bidding for player services or player jointly negotiating with team owners. ...

The Union basically doesn’t trust the ownership because collusion was a $280 million theft by Selig and [Jerry] Reinsdorf of that money from the players. I mean, they rigged the signing of free agents. They got caught. They paid $280 million to the players. And I think that’s polluted labor relations in baseball ever since it happened. I think it’s the reason [MLBPA executive director Donald] Fehr has no trust in Selig.

[2] Following an 18-9 no-confidence vote, Vincent resigned. Selig had by this time become chairman of the Executive Council of Major League Baseball, and as such became de facto acting commissioner. The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. ... Baseball collusion refers to baseball owners working together to avoid competitive bidding for player services or player jointly negotiating with team owners. ... USD redirects here. ... Jerry Reinsdorf (born February 25, 1936 in Brooklyn, New York) is the owner of Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Bulls. ... Donald Fehr (born July 18, 1946) is the managing director of the Major League Baseball Players Association. ...


Hailed by some baseball's owners as a visionary who has salvaged the sport, others have vilified Selig. His first major act was to institute the Wild Card and divisional playoff play, which has created much controversy amongst baseball fans. Those against the Wild Card see it as diminishing the importance of the pennant race and the regular season, with the true race often being for second rather than first place, while those in favor of it view it as an opportunity for teams to have a shot at the playoffs even when they have no chance of a first-place finish in their division, thus maintaining fan interest later in the season.


As Executive Council Chairman (Selig's official title while serving as "acting commissioner" from 1992-1998) and Commissioner, new stadiums have opened in Arizona, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Colorado, Detroit, Houston, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, Arlington, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C.. Chase Field, also known as The BOB (after its original name, Bank One Ballpark), is a stadium located in Phoenix, Arizona across the street from the US Airways Center, which is used by many local teams including the NBAs Phoenix Suns. ... View from the outfield Turner Field is a baseball stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Great American Ball Park is the home of the Cincinnati Reds, a member of Major League Baseballs National League, and is located in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio on the Ohio River. ... Jacobs Field (informally called The Jake) is a baseball stadium located in the middle of downtown Cleveland, Ohio. ... Coors Field, located in Denver, Colorado is the home field of the National Leagues Colorado Rockies. ... Comerica Park is a baseball stadium located in downtown Detroit, Michigan. ... Minute Maid Park (formerly Enron Field and Astros Field) is a baseball stadium in Houston, Texas, that opened in 2000 to house the Houston Astros. ... Miller Park is a baseball stadium located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Citizens Bank Park is a 43,647-seat baseball-only stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that opened on April 3, 2004 and hosted its first regular season baseball game on April 12 of that same year, as the tenants of the facility, the Philadelphia Phillies lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 4... PNC Park is a baseball stadium located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... PETCO Park is an open-air stadium in downtown San Diego, California. ... SBC Park (formerly Pacific Bell Park) is a baseball stadium, home to the San Francisco Giants of the National League. ... Safeco Field, sometimes simply referred to as Safeco, is the home of the Seattle Mariners baseball club. ... Ameriquest Field in Arlington is a baseball stadium located in Arlington, Texas, located between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. ... Busch Stadium III (a. ... Nationals Ballpark, the planned new ballpark for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball, is projected to open in April 2008. ...


Selig suspended Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott for a year in 1993 for repeated prejudicial remarks and actions. The same year, New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was reinstated from a lifelong suspension that was instituted by Selig's predecessor Fay Vincent. Pete Rose has claimed that he applied for reinstatement over the years and received no such consideration. It should be noted, that Rose along with his close friend and former teammate Mike Schmidt (who is a strong supporter of Rose's reinstatement into baseball), met with Selig in 2002, where Rose privately admitted to Selig (two years before going public with his admission) about betting on baseball. Incidentally, Bud Selig was a close friend of the late Bart Giamatti, who was the commissioner when Rose was first banned from the sport in 1989. Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // This year in baseball Events January - Reggie Jackson is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, receiving 94% of the vote. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Francis Thomas Fay Vincent, Jr. ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ... The Dowd Report is the document describing the alleged transgressions of baseball player Pete Rose in betting on baseball, which precipitated his agreement to a lifetime suspension from the sport in the United States. ... Angelo Bartlett Bart Giamatti (April 4, 1938 – September 1, 1989) was the President of Yale University, and later, the 7th commissioner of Major League Baseball in the United States. ... 1989 in baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


1994

As acting commissioner, he presided over the 1994 players strike and resulting cancellation of the World Series (the first time it had not been staged since 1904). Since then, most fans have accused Selig of being little more than a puppet for the owners rather than a true leader.[citation needed] Notably, the NBA, NHL, and NFL commissioners have always been considered primarily as advocates[citation needed] for the league owners who elect them and to whom they are answerable. Some have argued that Selig's role as a representative of the owners interests has led directly to Major League Baseball's ability to institute changes and bargain strongly with the Players Association in a way that was never possible before[citation needed]. The following are the events of the year 1994 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... fuck you u cock sucking ballin fucking bitch nuggett jew bag. ... The 1904 World Series is a championship series that didnt happen in American Major League Baseball. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... “NHL” redirects here. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. ...


Commissioner

After a six-year search for a new commissioner, the owners voted to give Selig the title on a permanent basis midway through the 1998 season. This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ...


During his tenure the game avoided a third work stoppage in 2002, and has seen the implementation of interleague play, divisional realignment (oddly enough, the subject that resulted in the ouster of Selig's predecessor Fay Vincent), and the addition of a third round of post-season play. This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ... Interleague Play Logo Interleague play is the term used to describe regular season Major League Baseball games played with teams in different leagues, introduced in 1997. ...


Whereas in the past, the National and American Leagues had separate administrative organizations (which, for example, allowed for the introduction of different rules such as the designated hitter), under Selig, Major League Baseball consolidated the administrative functions of the American and National League into the Commissioner's Office in 2000. The last official presidents of the NL and AL were Leonard Coleman and Dr. Gene Budig respectively. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2000 throughout the world. ... Gene Budig was the president of Major League Baseballs American League from 1994- 1999. ...


2001

On September 11, 2001, Selig ordered all baseball games postponed for a week because of the terror attacks on New York and Washington. The games were postponed not only out of respect and mourning for the victims, but also out of concern for the safety and security of fans and players. is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2001 throughout the world. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Selig was heavily criticized for staging contraction hearings on the Minnesota Twins and the Montréal Expos, Oakland Athletics, and Tampa Bay Devil Rays less than 48 hours after the dramatic conclusion of the 2001 World Series. This action, among others, led to Selig (along with former Expos owner Jeffrey Loria) being charged with racketeering and conspiring with Loria to deliberately defraud the Expos minority owners. If found guilty the league could have been liable for $300 million in punitive damages. Selig was eager to settle the case because the judge had previously ruled that the Expos could not be moved or contracted until the case was over. The case eventually went to arbitration and was settled out of court for an undisclosed sum. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... The Montreal Expos (French: Les Expos de Montréal) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 until 2004. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations American League (1998–present) East Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 12, 42 Name Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-Rays, The Rays Ballpark Tropicana Field (1998–present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) none Division titles... Dates October 27, 2001–November 4, 2001 MVP Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling (Arizona) Television network FOX Announcers Joe Buck and Tim McCarver Umpires Steve Rippley, Dana DeMuth, Dale Scott, Mark Hirschbeck, Jim Joyce, Ed Rapuano The 2001 World Series (the November Series) took place between the Arizona Diamondbacks and... Jeffrey H. Loria is an art dealer and an owner of professional baseball teams, and is one of the most popular topics for college research papers. ... USD redirects here. ...


2002

In 2002, Selig began enforcing the 60/40 rule (asset/debt ratio). This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ...


Also in 2002, an embarrassing moment for Selig occurred during the All-Star Game in Selig's hometown of Milwaukee. The game was tied 7-7 in the bottom of the 11th inning. Unfortunately, the recent custom of allowing each player appearance time meant that the managers had used their entire rosters. To avoid risking the arms of the pitchers who were currently on the mound, Selig declared the game a tie, to the dissatisfaction of the Milwaukee fans. Since then, Selig has tried to reinvigorate the All-Star Game, most notably by awarding the winning league home-field advantage in the World Series. The 2003 All-Star Game had the same U.S. viewership as 2002 (9.5 rating; 17 share) and the ratings declined in 2004 (8.8 rating; 15 share) and 2005 (8.1 rating; 14 share).[3] The American television audience increased in 2006 (9.3 rating; 16 share).[4] The 2002 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 73rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. ... Miller Park is a baseball stadium located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... The 2003 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 74th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ...


2005

In 2005, Selig faced Congress on the issue of steroids. After the Congressional hearings in early 2005, and with the scrutiny of the sports and national media upon this issue, Selig put forth a proposal for a stricter performance-enhancing drug testing regime to replace the current system. This proposal also included the banning of amphetamines, a first for the major North American sports leagues. The MLB Players Association and MLB reached an agreement in November on the new policy.[5] The following are the baseball events of the year 2005 throughout the world. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Anabolic steroids are a class of natural and synthetic steroid hormones that promote cell growth and division, resulting in growth of muscle tissue and sometimes bone size and strength. ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. ...


On July 1, 2005, Selig suspended Texas Rangers pitcher Kenny Rogers for 20 games and fined him $50,000. Rogers got in trouble when on June 29, 2005, he purposely grabbed the camera of a cameraman, resulting in one camera falling to the ground. When the cameraman proceeded to pick up his camera, Rogers went back to him in an arguably threatening way. One of the reporters then resumed filming and Rogers smiled and talked to him. While an appeal of his suspension was pending, Rogers appeared at the 2005 All-Star Game in Detroit, where fans loudly booed him. On July 22, 2005, Selig heard Rogers' appeal of his suspension; he decided to uphold the 20 games. However, an independent arbitrator ruled that Selig had exceeded his authority and reduced it to 13 games. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2005 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... Kenneth Scott Rogers (born November 10, 1964 in Savannah, Georgia) is a left-handed American Major League Baseball pitcher who has played for six Major League Baseball teams since his rookie year in 1989. ... USD redirects here. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 76th playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. ... This article is actively undergoing a major edit. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2005 throughout the world. ...


2006

On December 1, 2006, Selig announced that he would be retiring as commissioner of baseball upon the expiration of his contract in 2009. Selig earned $14.5 million dollars from MLBA over the timespan October 31, 2005 to October 31, 2006.[6] is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2006 throughout the world. ...


The Steroids Investigation

In early 2006, Selig was forced to deal with the issue of steroid use. On March 29, 2006, ESPN learned that former Senator and Disney chairman George J. Mitchell will head an investigation into past steroid use by Major League Baseball players, including San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds. ... Crystal structure of human sex hormone-binding globulin, transporting 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone. ...


On March 30, 2006, as a response to the controversy of the use of performance-enhancing drugs and the anticipated career home run record to be set by Barry Bonds, Selig asked former senator George Mitchell to lead an independent investigation into the use of steroids in baseball's recent past. Joe Sheehan from Baseball Prospectus wrote that the commission has been focusing "blame for the era exclusively on uniformed personnel", and failing to investigate any role played by team ownership and management.[7] is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2006 throughout the world. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... Joseph S. (Joe) Sheehan was born in New York City, graduated with a degree in journalism from the University of Southern California in 1994, and lives in the Los Angeles area. ... Baseball Prospectus, sometimes abbreviated as BP, is a think-tank focusing on the statistical analysis of the sport of baseball, which is also known as sabermetrics. ...


2007

Much controversy surrounded Selig and his involvement in Barry Bonds' all-time home run record chase. For months, speculation surrounded Selig and the possibility that he and Hank Aaron would not attend Bonds' games as he closed in on the record. Selig announced in July 2007 when Bonds was near 755 home runs that he would attend the games. Selig was in attendance for Bonds' record-tying home run against the San Diego Padres, sitting in Padres owner John Moores' private suite. Also, Bud Selig did not attend the San Francisco Giants' baseball game on August 7th where Barry Bonds hit his record-breaking 756th home run. Selig did release a statement that congratulated Bonds. Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is currently a left fielder for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... John Moores can refer to: John Moores - owner of the San Diego Padres John Moores - British merchant. ...


Notable changes to Major League Baseball

Bud Selig helped introduce the following changes to Major League Baseball:

Interleague Play Logo Interleague play is the term used to describe regular season Major League Baseball games played with teams in different leagues, introduced in 1997. ... In North American professional sports leagues, the term wild card refers to a team that qualifies for the championship playoffs without winning their specific subdivision (usually called a conference or division) outright. ... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... Major League Baseballs drug policy Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment program is a drug policy established by agreement between the MLB Players Association and the Office of the Commissioner of Baseball in order to deter and end the use by baseball players of banned substances, including anabolic steroids and... The World Baseball Classic, sometimes abbreviated WBC, is an international baseball tournament, first held in March 2006. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...

Israeli Baseball League

Selig serves on the Advisory Committee of the newly formed Israel Baseball League. The Israel Baseball League (IBL) (Hebrew: ליגת הבייסבול הישראלית) is a new professional baseball league in Israel. ...


Misc. Facts

Because of such controversial decisions as exhibited in declaring the 2002 All-Star game a tie, Bud has earned himself the nickname "Bud Light" among some in the business.


References

  1. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2681764M
  2. ^ http://www.businessofbaseball.com/vincent_interview.htm
  3. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/asgbox/asgtv.shtml
  4. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/baseball/mlb/specials/all_star/2006/07/12/bc.bbo.all.starratings.ap/index.html
  5. ^ "MLBPA/MLB joint announcement", MLBPA, 2005-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. 
  6. ^ Press, Canadian (2007-04-03). MLB: Selig made $14.5 million last year (HTML). The Sports Network (TSN). Retrieved on 2007-09-12.
  7. ^ Sheehan, Joe (2007-05-22). Prospectus Today — Break with the Past (HTML). Baseball Prospectus. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Fay Vincent as Commissioner
Acting Commissioner of Baseball
1992-1998
Succeeded by
Became Commissioner of Baseball
Preceded by
Fay Vincent
Commissioner of Baseball
1998-present
Succeeded by
Incumbent

 
 

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