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Encyclopedia > Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. This principal facade of 1850 by Edward Blore, the East Front, was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb.
Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. This principal facade of 1850 by Edward Blore, the East Front, was redesigned in 1913 by Sir Aston Webb.

[edit] Buckingham Palace is the official London residence of the British monarch.[1] The palace is a setting for state occasions and royal entertaining, and a major tourist attraction. It has been a rallying point for the British people at times of national rejoicing and crisis. Image File history File links Buckingham_Palace,_London,_England,_24Jan04. ... Image File history File links Buckingham_Palace,_London,_England,_24Jan04. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... West facade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) (Pronounced fa-sa-de) is generally the exterior of a building — especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... Buckingham Palace as completed by Blore in 1850. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ...


Originally known as Buckingham House, the building forming the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence, known as "The Queen's House". It was enlarged over the next 75 years, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard. Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th century, including the present-day public face of Buckingham Palace. Leinster House, 18th century Dublin townhouse of the Duke of Leinster. ... John Sheffield was the 1st Duke of BuckinghamSHIRE not the 1st Duke of Buckingham. ... “George III” redirects here. ... A residence may be a house, a place to live, like a nursing home. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... John Nash For other people of the same name, see John Nash. ... Buckingham Palace as completed by Blore in 1850. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ...


The original early 19th-century interior designs, many of which still survive, included widespread use of brightly coloured scagliola and blue and pink lapis, on the advice of Sir Charles Long. King Edward VII oversaw a partial redecoration in a Belle epoque cream and gold colour scheme. Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House following the death of King George IV. The Buckingham Palace Garden is the largest private garden in London, originally landscaped by Capability Brown, but redesigned by William Townsend Aiton of Kew Gardens and John Nash. The artificial lake was completed in 1828 and is supplied with water from the Serpentine, a lake in Hyde Park. Scagliola (from the Italian scaglia, meaning chips) is a technique for producing plasterwork columns, sculptures, and other architectural elements that resemble marble. ... A block of lapis lazuli Lapis lazuli is one of the oldest of all gems, with a history of use stretching back 7,000 years. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... The Belle poque, or beautiful era, was a period in Frances history that began during the late 19th century and lasted until World War I. Occurring at the midpoint of the Third Republic, the Belle poque was considered a golden time of beauty, innovation, and peace between France and... Chinese House (Potsdam) Chinoiserie[1] refers to a recurring theme in European artistic styles since the seventeenth century, which reflects Chinese art and is characterized by the use of fanciful imagery of an imaginary China, by asymmetry in format and whimsical contrasts of scale, and by the attempts to imitate... Brighton Pavilion redirects here. ... Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ... The entrance front of Carlton House. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ... Capability Brown, by Nathaniel Dance, ca. ... William Aiton (1731-1793). ... “Kew Gardens” redirects here. ... The Serpentine is a lake in Hyde Park, London. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ...


The state rooms form the nucleus of the working Palace and are currently used regularly by Queen Elizabeth II and members of the royal family for official and state entertaining. Buckingham Palace is one of the world's most familiar buildings and more than 50,000 people visit the palace each year as guests to banquets, lunches, dinners, receptions and the royal garden parties. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...

Queen Victoria, the first monarch to reside at Buckingham Palace, moved into the newly completed palace upon her accession in 1837
Queen Victoria, the first monarch to reside at Buckingham Palace, moved into the newly completed palace upon her accession in 1837

Contents

Image File history File links Dronning_victoria. ... Image File history File links Dronning_victoria. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ...

History

Buckingham House, c.1710, was designed by William Winde for the first Duke of Buckingham and Normanby. This façade evolved into today's Grand Entrance on the west (inner) side of the quadrangle, with the Green Drawing Room above.

Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_House_1710. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_House_1710. ... Captain William Winde (c1645-1722) was an architect. ...

The site

In the Middle Ages, Buckingham Palace's site formed part of the Manor of Ebury (also called Eia). The marshy ground was watered by the river Tyburn, which still flows below the courtyard and south wing of the palace. Where the river was fordable - Cow Ford - a village, Eye Cross, grew up. Ownership of the site changed hands many times; owners included Edward the Confessor and his queen consort Edith of Wessex in late Saxon times, and, after the Norman Conquest, William the Conqueror. William gave the site to Geoffrey de Mandeville, who bequeathed it to the monks of Westminster Abbey.[2] The Tyburn is a stream in London, which runs underground from South Hampstead through St. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Edith of Wessex, (c. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... William I of England (c. ... Geoffrey de Mandeville (d. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


In 1531 Henry VIII acquired the Hospital of St James (later St. James's Palace) from Eton College, and in 1536 he took the Manor of Ebury from Westminster Abbey. These transfers brought the site of Buckingham Palace back into royal hands for the first time since William the Conqueror had given it away almost 500 years earlier. “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and...


Various owners leased it from royal landlords and the freehold was the subject of frenzied speculation in the 17th century. By then, the old village of Eye Cross had long since fallen into decay, and the area was mostly wasteland.[3] Needing money, James I sold off part of the Crown freehold but retained part of the site on which he established a four-acre mulberry garden for the production of silk. (This is at the northwest corner of today's palace.) Clement Walker in Anarchia Anglicana (1649) refers to "new-erected sodoms and spintries at the Mulberry Garden at S. James's"; this suggests it may have been a place of debauchery. Eventually, in the late 17th century, the freehold was inherited from the property tycoon Sir Hugh Audley by the great heiress Mary Davies.[4] Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ...


First houses on the site

Possibly the first house erected within the site was that of a Sir William Blake, around 1624.[5] The next owner was Lord Goring, who from 1633 extended Blake's house and developed much of today's garden, then known as Goring Great Garden. He did not, however, manage to obtain freehold interest in the mulberry garden. Unbeknown to Goring, in 1640 the document "failed to pass the great seal before King Charles I fled London, which it needed to do for legal execution".[6] (It was this critical omission that helped the British royal family regain the freehold under King George III.) George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich (1583? - 1663), English soldier, was the son of George Goring of Hurstpierpoint and Ovingdean, Sussex, and of Anne Denny, sister of Edward Denny, earl of Norwich. ... Charles I King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles I (19 November 1600–30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his death. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...


The improvident Goring defaulted on his rents; Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington obtained the mansion and was occupying it, now known as Goring House, when it burnt down in 1674. Arlington House rose on the site — the southern wing of today's palace — the next year, and its freehold was bought in 1702. Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington (1618 - July 28, 1685), was an English statesman. ...


The house which forms the architectural core of the present palace was built for the first Duke of Buckingham and Normanby in 1703 to the design of William Winde. The style chosen was of a large, three-floored central block with two smaller flanking service wings. John Sheffield was the 1st Duke of BuckinghamSHIRE not the 1st Duke of Buckingham. ... Captain William Winde (c1645-1722) was an architect. ...


Buckingham House was eventually sold by Buckingham's descendant, Sir Charles Sheffield, in 1762 to King George III for £21,000.[7] (Like his grandfather, George II, George III refused to sell the mulberry garden interest, so that Sheffield had been unable to purchase the full freehold of the site.) The house was originally intended as a private retreat for the royal family, and in particular for Queen Charlotte, and was known as The Queen's House. St. James's Palace remained the official and ceremonial royal residence; indeed, the tradition continues to the present time of foreign ambassadors being formally accredited to "the Court of St. James's", even though it is at Buckingham Palace that they present their credentials and staff to the Queen upon their appointment. George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... The pound, a unit of currency, originated (at least in Britain) as the value of a pound mass of silver. ... Queen Charlotte, (née Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–20). ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... The Court of St Jamess is the popular name of the royal court of the United Kingdom. ...


The Garden, the Royal Mews and the Mall

A garden party at Buckingham Palace in 1868.
A garden party at Buckingham Palace in 1868.
For more details on this topic, see Buckingham Palace Gardens.

At the back of the palace, large and park-like, is Buckingham Palace Garden. The Garden Front of the palace, by Nash, is of pale golden Bath stone. The garden, which includes a lake, is the largest private garden in London. Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_garden_party_ILN_1868. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_garden_party_ILN_1868. ... Buckingham Palace Gardens are the Queens back garden. ... Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ...


Here the Queen hosts her annual garden parties each summer, but since June 2002, she has invited the public into the Garden on numerous occasions. See Buckingham Palace Garden for accounts for the historical spectaculars which marked the Queen's Golden Jubilee (2002) and her 80th birthday (2006). Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ...

Crowds walk down the Mall towards the palace and the Victoria Memorial. The flags interspersed with the Union Flag indicate a Norwegian state visit in progress.
Crowds walk down the Mall towards the palace and the Victoria Memorial. The flags interspersed with the Union Flag indicate a Norwegian state visit in progress.

Adjacent to the palace is the Royal Mews, also designed by Nash, where the royal carriages, including the Gold State Coach, are housed. This rococo gilt coach, designed by Sir William Chambers in 1760, has painted panels by G. B. Cipriani. It was first used for the State Opening of Parliament by George III in 1762 and is used by the monarch only for coronations or jubilee celebrations.[8] Also housed in the Mews are the carriage horses used in royal ceremonial processions. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3085 KB) Summary View of Buckingham Palace, From the Mall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3085 KB) Summary View of Buckingham Palace, From the Mall. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... The Royal Mews is the mews (stables and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family in London. ... The Gold State Coach was built in 1762 and has been used at every coronation of the British monarch since George IV. The coach weighs four tons and is 24 feet long and 12 feet high. ... North side of the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo - carriage courtyard: all the stucco details sparkled with gold until 1773, when Catherine II had gilding replaced with olive drab paint. ... The central courtyard of Chambers Somerset House in London. ... Giovanni Battista Cipriani (1727–1785), Italian painter and engraver, Pistoiese by descent, was born in Florence. ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ...


The Mall, a ceremonial approach route to the palace, was designed by Sir Aston Webb and completed in 1911 as part of a grand memorial to Queen Victoria. It extends from Admiralty Arch, up around the Victoria Memorial to the palace forecourt. This route is used by the cavalcades and motorcades of all visiting heads of state, and by the Royal Family on state occasions such as the annual State Opening of Parliament as well as Trooping the Colour each year. The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall (/mæl/) in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end, where it crosses Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and for... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... In architecture a forecourt is an open area in front of a structures entrance. ... In the United Kingdom, the State Opening of Parliament is an annual event held usually in October or November that marks the commencement of a session of Parliament. ... Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 Trooping the Colour is a military pageant or ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. ...


Home of the monarch

The palace c.1837, depicting the Marble Arch, which served as the ceremonial entrance to the palace precincts. It was moved to make way for the east wing, built in 1847, which enclosed the quadrangle.

Buckingham Palace finally became the principal Royal residence in 1837 on the accession of Queen Victoria. While the state rooms were a riot of gilt and colour, the necessities of the new palace were somewhat less luxurious. For one thing, it was reported the chimneys smoked so much that the fires had to be allowed to die, and consequently the court shivered in icy magnificence.[9] Ventilation was so bad that the interior smelled, and when a decision was taken to install gas lamps there was a serious worry about the build-up of gas on the lower floors. It was also said that the staff were lax and lazy and the palace was dirty.[10] Following the Queen's marriage in 1840, her husband, Prince Albert, concerned himself with a reorganization of the household offices and staff, and with the design faults of the palace. The problems were all rectified by the close of 1840. However, the builders were to return within the decade. Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_engraved_by_J.Woods_after_Hablot_Browne_&_R.Garland_publ_1837_edited. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_engraved_by_J.Woods_after_Hablot_Browne_&_R.Garland_publ_1837_edited. ... Marble Arch was originally erected on The Mall, as a gateway to the newly rebuilt Buckingham Palace. ... A precinct is a space enclosed by the walls or other boundaries of a particular place or building, or by an arbitrary and imaginary line drawn around it. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


By 1847, the couple had found the palace too small for Court life and their growing family[11] and consequently the new wing, designed by Edward Blore, was built, enclosing the central quadrangle. This large east wing, facing The Mall is today the 'public face' of Buckingham Palace and contains the balcony from which the Royal Family acknowledge the crowds on momentous occasions and annually following Trooping the Colour. The ballroom wing and a further suite of state rooms were also built in this period, designed by Nash's student Sir James Pennethorne. Buckingham Palace as completed by Blore in 1850. ... The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall (/mæl/) in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end, where it crosses Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and for... Members of the royal family shared amongst the Commonwealth Realms. ... Elizabeth II riding to Trooping the Colour for the last time in 1986 Trooping the Colour is a military pageant or ceremony performed by regiments of the Commonwealth and the British Army. ... A ballroom is a large room inside a building, the designated puprose of which is holding dances (balls). ... Sir James Pennethorne (June 4, 1801 – 1871) was a notable 19th century English architect and planner, particularly associated with buildings and parks in central London. ...


Before Prince Albert's demise, Queen Victoria was known to openly love music and dancing[12] and the greatest contemporary musicians entertained at Buckingham Palace. Felix Mendelssohn is known to have played there on three occasions. Johann Strauss II and his orchestra played there when in England. Strauss's 'Alice Polka' was first performed at the palace in 1849 in honour of the Queen's daughter, Princess Alice. Under Victoria, Buckingham Palace was frequently the scene of lavish costume balls, in addition to the routine royal ceremonies, investitures and presentations. Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Johann Strauss II The Waltz King coming to life in the Stadtpark, Vienna Johann Strauss II (in German: Johann Strauß (Sohn), Johann Strauss (son); in English also Johann Strauss the Younger, Johann Strauss Jr. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary), (25 April 1843 – 14 December 1878), was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ...


When widowed in 1861, the grief-stricken Queen withdrew from public life and left Buckingham Palace to live at Windsor Castle, Balmoral Castle, and Osborne House. For many years the palace was seldom used, and even neglected. Eventually public opinion forced her to return to London, though even then she preferred to live elsewhere whenever possible. Court functions were still held at Windsor Castle rather than at the palace, presided over by the sombre Queen habitually dressed in mourning black while Buckingham Palace remained shuttered for most of the year.[13] This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Balmoral Castle. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, UK. // History The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ...


Interior

Piano nobile of Buckingham Palace. A: State Dining Room; B:Blue Drawing Room; C:Music Room; D:White Drawing Room; E:Royal Closet; F:Throne Room; G:Green drawing Room; H:Cross Gallery; J:Ball Room; K:East Gallery; L:Yellow Drawing Room; M:Centre/Balcony Room; N:Chinese Luncheon Room; O:Principal Corridor; P:Private Apartments; Q:Service Areas; W:The Grand staircase. On the ground floor: R:Ambassador's Entrance; T: Grand Entrance. The areas defined by shaded walls represent lower minor wings. Note: This is an unscaled sketch plan for reference only. Proportions of some rooms may slightly differ in reality.

The palace contains 77,000 square metres of floorspace (828,818 square feet).[14] The principal rooms of the palace are contained on the piano nobile behind the west-facing garden facade at the rear of the palace. The centre of this ornate suite of state rooms is the Music Room, its large bow the dominant feature of the facade. Flanking the Music Room are the Blue and the White Drawing rooms. At the centre of the suite, serving as a corridor to link the state rooms, is the Picture Gallery, which is top lit and 55 yards (50 m) long. The Gallery is hung with works by Rembrandt, van Dyck, Rubens, and Vermeer, other rooms leading from the Picture Gallery are the Throne Room and the Green Drawing Room. The Green Drawing room serves as a huge anteroom to the Throne Room, and is part of the ceremonial route to the Throne from the Guard Room at the top of the Grand Staircase. The Guard Room contains a white marble statue of Prince Albert, in Roman costume set in a tribune lined with tapestries. These very formal rooms are used only for ceremonial and official entertaining. Unscaled and simplified room plan of Buckingham Palace, drawn by uploader who releases into public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Unscaled and simplified room plan of Buckingham Palace, drawn by uploader who releases into public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Kedleston Hall. ... Kedleston Hall. ... In British society, a drawing room is a room in a house where visitors may be entertained. ... This article is about the Dutch painter. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... “Vermeer” redirects here. ... Throne Room redirects here, for the album by CeCe Winans see Throne Room (album) A throne room is the room, often rather a hall, in the official residence of the crown, either a palace or a fortified castle, where the throne of a senior figure (usually a monarch) is set... Interior of the Hagia Sophia. ...


Directly underneath the State Apartments is a suite of slightly less grand rooms known as the semi-state apartments. Opening from the marble hall, these rooms are used for less-formal entertaining, such as luncheon parties and private audiences. Some of the rooms are named and decorated for particular visitors, such as the '1844 Room', which was decorated in that year for the State visit of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia. At the centre of this suite is the Bow Room, through which thousands of guests pass annually to the Queen's Garden Parties in the Gardens beyond. The Queen uses privately a smaller suite of rooms in the North wing. Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Nicholas I (Russian: Николай I Павлович, Nikolai I Pavlovich), July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796–March 2 (18 February Old Style), 1855), was the Emperor of Russia from 1825 until 1855, known as one of the most reactionary of the Russian monarchs. ...


Between 1847 and 1850, when Blore was building the new east wing, the Brighton Pavilion was once again plundered of its fittings. As a result many of the rooms in the new wing have a distinctly oriental atmosphere. The red and blue Chinese Luncheon Room is made up from parts of the Brighton banqueting and music rooms, but has a chimney piece, also from Brighton, in design more Indian than Chinese. The Yellow Drawing Room has 18th century wall paper, which was supplied in 1817 for the Brighton Saloon, and the chimney piece in this room is a European vision of what the Chinese equivalent would look like, complete with nodding mandarins in niches and fearsome winged dragons. A Mandarin was a bureaucrat in imperial China. ... Florentine Renaissance painter Filippo Lippi placed his Madonna of the 1440s within a simulated shell-headed niche The niche in classical architecture is an exedra or an apse that has been reduced in size, retaining the half-dome heading usual for an apse. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Han Tu: The Chinese dragon is a mythical Chinese creature that also appears in other East Asian cultures, and is also sometimes called the Oriental (or Eastern) dragon. ...

Prince Albert's music room, one of the smaller less formal rooms at the palace, in 1887.
Prince Albert's music room, one of the smaller less formal rooms at the palace, in 1887.

At the centre of this wing is the famous balcony, with the Centre Room behind its glass doors. This is a Chinese-style saloon enhanced by Queen Mary who working with the designer Sir Charles Allom created a more "binding"[15] Chinese theme in the late 1920s, although the lacquer doors were brought from Brighton in 1873. Running the length of the piano nobile of the east wing is the great gallery, modestly known as the Principal Corridor which runs the length of the eastern side of the quadrangle[16] It has mirrored doors, and mirrored cross walls reflecting porcelain pagodas and other oriental furniture from Brighton. The Chinese Luncheon Room and Yellow Drawing Room are situated at each end of this gallery, with the Centre Room obviously placed in the centre. Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_Prince_Alberts_music_room_The_Graphic_1887. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_Prince_Alberts_music_room_The_Graphic_1887. ... Sir Charles Carrick Allom (1865 — 1947) was an eminent British architect and decorator, knighted for his work on Buckingham Palace. ... In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ... “Fine China” redirects here. ...


Visiting heads of state today, when staying at the palace, occupy a suite of rooms known as the Belgian suite, which is on the ground floor of the North-facing garden front. These rooms, with corridors enhanced by saucer domes, were first decorated for Prince Albert's uncle Léopold I, first King of the Belgians. King Edward VIII lived in these rooms during his short reign. Head of state or Chief of state is the generic term for the individual or collective office that serves as the chief public representative of a monarchic or republican nation-state, federation, commonwealth or any other political state. ... Saucer dome is the architectural term used for a low pitched shallow dome. ... Léopold I, first King of the Belgians, (December 16, 1790 - December 10, 1865), was born in Ehrenburg Castle in the Bavarian town of Coburg, and named Leopold Georg Christian Friedrich (Léopold Georges Chrétien Frédéric in French, Leopold Georg Christiaan Frederik in Dutch). ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20...


Court ceremonies

The State Ballroom is the largest room at Buckingham Palace. It was added by Queen Victoria and is used for ceremonies such as investitures and state banquets. This picture dates from 1856. The polychrome colour scheme has been replaced by mainly white decoration with gold details and red upholstery.
The State Ballroom is the largest room at Buckingham Palace. It was added by Queen Victoria and is used for ceremonies such as investitures and state banquets. This picture dates from 1856. The polychrome colour scheme has been replaced by mainly white decoration with gold details and red upholstery.

During the current reign court ceremony has undergone a radical change, and entry to the palace is no longer the prerogative of just the upper class.[17] Image File history File linksMetadata Louis_Haghe_The_New_Ballroom_1856. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Louis_Haghe_The_New_Ballroom_1856. ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ...


There has been a progressive relaxation of the dress code governing formal court uniform and dress. In previous reigns, men not wearing military uniform wore knee breeches of an 18th-century design. Women's evening dress included obligatory trains and tiaras and/or feathers in their hair. After World War I, when Queen Mary wished to follow fashion by raising her skirts a few inches from the ground, she requested a Lady-in-Waiting to shorten her own skirt first to gauge the King's reaction. King George V was horrified and Queen Mary's hemline remained unfashionably low. Subsequently, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth allowed daytime skirts to rise. To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... US Marine Corps MARPAT uniform Military uniforms comprises standardised dress worn by members of the armed forces of various nations. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pants. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ...


Today there is no official dress code.[18] Most men invited to Buckingham Palace in the daytime choose to wear service uniform or morning coats, and in the evening, depending on the formality of the occasion, black tie or white tie. If the occasion is 'white tie' then women, if they possess one, wear a tiara. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff...


One of the first major changes was in 1958 when the Queen abolished the presentation parties for debutantes.[19] These court presentations of aristocratic girls to the monarch took place in the Throne Room. Debutantes wore full court dress, with three tall ostrich feathers in their hair. They entered, curtsied, performed a choreographed backwards walk and a further curtsey, while manoeuvring a dress train of prescribed length. The ceremony corresponded to the "court drawing rooms" of earlier reigns, and Queen Elizabeth II replaced the presentations with large and frequent palace garden parties for an invited cross-section of British society. The late Princess Margaret is reputed to have remarked of the debutante presentations: "We had to put a stop to it, every tart in London was getting in".[20] Today, the Throne Room is used for the reception of formal addresses such as those given to the Queen on her Jubilees. It is here on the throne dais that royal wedding portraits and family photographs are taken. A debutante (or deb) (from the French débutante, female beginner) is a young lady from an aristocratic or upper class family who has reached the age of maturity, and as a new adult, is introduced to society at a formal presentation known as her debut or coming out. Originally... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... Throne Room redirects here, for the album by CeCe Winans see Throne Room (album) A throne room is the room, often rather a hall, in the official residence of the crown, either a palace or a fortified castle, where the throne of a senior figure (usually a monarch) is set... In British society, a drawing room is a room in a house where visitors may be entertained. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ...


Investitures, which include the conferring of knighthoods by dubbing with a sword, and other awards take place in the palace's Victorian Ballroom, built in 1854. At 123 ft by 60 ft (37 m by 20 m), this is the largest room in the palace. It has replaced the Throne Room in importance and use. During investitures the Queen stands on the throne dais beneath a giant, domed velvet canopy, known as a shamiana or a baldachin, used at the coronation Durbar in Delhi in 1911. A military band plays in the musicians' gallery, as the recipients of awards approach the Queen and receive their honours, watched by their families and friends. Investiture, from the Latin (preposition in and verb vestire, dress from vestis robe) is a rather general term for the formal installation of an incumbent (heir, elect of nominee) in public office, especially by taking possession of its insignia. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Throne Room redirects here, for the album by CeCe Winans see Throne Room (album) A throne room is the room, often rather a hall, in the official residence of the crown, either a palace or a fortified castle, where the throne of a senior figure (usually a monarch) is set... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet Margaret Beaufort, Queen Mother, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Engraving of the Gnadenaltar in the Vierzehnheiligen Basilica, Bad Staffelstein, Bavaria. ... Delhi Durbar means Court of Delhi which took place in 1911. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Honour (disambiguation). ...

This 1870 drawing shows guests ascending the Grand Staircase.

State banquets also take place in the Ballroom. These formal dinners take place on the first evening of a state visit by a visiting Head of State. On these occasions, often over 150 guests in formal "white tie and decorations" including tiaras for women, dine off gold plate. The largest and most formal reception at Buckingham Palace takes place every November, when the Queen entertains members of the foreign diplomatic corps resident in London. On this occasion all the state rooms are in use, as the Royal Family proceed through them [21] beginning their procession through the great north doors of the Picture Gallery. As Nash had envisaged, all the large, double-mirrored doors stand open, reflecting the numerous crystal chandeliers and sconces, causing a deliberate optical illusion of space and light. Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_Grand_Staircase_The_Graphic_1870. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Buckingham_Palace_Grand_Staircase_The_Graphic_1870. ... State Banquet. ...


Smaller ceremonies such as the reception of new ambassadors take place in the '1844 Room'. Here too the Queen holds small lunch parties, and often meetings of the Privy Council. Larger lunch parties often take place in the curved and domed Music Room, or the State Dining Room. On all formal occasions the ceremonies are attended by the Yeomen of the Guard in their historic uniforms, and other officers of the court such as the Lord Chamberlain. Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... Yeomen of the Guard in the procession to the annual service of the Order of the Garter at Windsor Castle Yeomen of the Guard during QEI reign For the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, see The Yeomen of the Guard The Queens Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard... The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the Royal Household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the Great Officers of State. ...


Since the bombing of the palace chapel in World War II, royal christenings have sometimes taken place in the Music Room. The Queen's first three children were all baptised here[22] in a special gold font. Prince William was christened in the Music Room; however, his brother, Prince Harry, was christened at St George's Chapel, Windsor. “Prince William” redirects here. ... St. ...


The largest functions of the year are the Queen's Garden Parties for up to 8,000 invitees, taking tea and sandwiches in marquees erected in the Garden. As a military band plays the National Anthem, the Queen emerges from the Bow Room and slowly walks through the assembled guests towards her private tea tent, greeting those previously selected for the honour. Those guests who do not actually have the opportunity to meet the Queen at least have the consolation of being able to admire the Garden. Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ... Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ...


Modern history

Buckingham Palace panorama, 1909
Buckingham Palace panorama, 1909
The east front of Buckingham Palace was completed in 1850. Seen here in 1910, it was remodelled to its present form in 1913

In 1901 the accession of Edward VII saw new life breathed into the palace. The new King and his wife Queen Alexandra had always been at the forefront of London high society, and their friends, known as "the Marlborough House Set", were considered to be the most eminent and fashionable of the age. Buckingham Palace—the Ballroom, Grand Entrance, Marble Hall, Grand Staircase, vestibules and galleries redecorated in the Belle epoque cream and gold colour scheme they retain today—once again became the focal point of the British Empire and a setting for entertaining on a majestic scale. Many people feel King Edward's heavy redecoration of the palace does not complement Nash's original work.[23] However, it has been allowed to remain for one hundred years. Download high resolution version (936x221, 31 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (936x221, 31 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Buckingham Palace before 1912. ... Buckingham Palace before 1912. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (Alexandra Carolina Marie Charlotte Louise Julia; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925) was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ... Marlborough House, London Marlborough House is a mansion in Westminster, London. ... The Belle poque, or beautiful era, was a period in Frances history that began during the late 19th century and lasted until World War I. Occurring at the midpoint of the Third Republic, the Belle poque was considered a golden time of beauty, innovation, and peace between France and... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...


The last major building work took place during the reign of King George V when, in 1913, Sir Aston Webb redesigned Blore's 1850 East Front to resemble in part Giacomo Leoni's Lyme Park in Cheshire. This new, refaced principal facade (of Portland stone) was designed to be the backdrop to the Victoria Memorial, a large memorial statue of Queen Victoria, placed outside the main gates. George V, who had succeeded Edward VII in 1910, had a more serious personality than his father; greater emphasis was now placed on official entertaining and royal duties than on lavish parties. George V's wife Queen Mary was a connoisseur of the arts, and took a keen interest in the royal collection of furniture and art, both restoring and adding to it. Queen Mary also had many new fixtures and fittings installed, such as the pair of marble Empire-style chimneypieces by Benjamin Vulliamy, dating from 1810, which the Queen had installed in the ground floor Bow Room, the huge low room at the centre of the garden facade. Queen Mary was also responsible for the decoration of the Blue Drawing Room. This room, 69 feet (21 m) long, previously known as the South Drawing Room, has one of Nash's finest ceilings, coffered with huge gilt console brackets. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Lyme Park, Cheshire designed by Giacomo Leoni. ... The south front of Lyme Park, Cheshire as rebuilt by Giacomo Leoni. ... Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a county in North West England. ... The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... A connoisseur (Fr. ... Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ... Empire is an early 19th century style of architecture and furniture design that and originates from Napoleons rule of France. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Console may be: An organ term for the area of an organ including the keys, stops, and foot pedals manipulated by the organist. ...

Victoria Memorial was created by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock in 1911 and erected in front of the main gates at Buckingham Palace on a surround was constructed by the architect Sir Aston Webb.
Victoria Memorial was created by the sculptor Sir Thomas Brock in 1911 and erected in front of the main gates at Buckingham Palace on a surround was constructed by the architect Sir Aston Webb.

In 1999 it was stated[24] that the palace contained 19 state rooms, 52 principal bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices, and 78 bathrooms. While this may seem large, it is small when compared to the Tsar's palaces in St. Petersburg and at Tsarskoe Selo, the Papal Palace in Rome, the Royal Palace of Madrid, or indeed the former Palace of Whitehall, and tiny compared to the Forbidden City and Potala Palace. The relative smallness of the palace may be best appreciated from within, looking out over the inner quadrangle. A minor extension was made in 1938, in which the north-west pavilion, designed by Nash, was converted into a swimming pool. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1466x1975, 578 KB) Victoria Memorial, London, England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1466x1975, 578 KB) Victoria Memorial, London, England. ... Victoria Memorial Victoria Memorial is a sculpture in London, in front of Buckingham Palace. ... Sir Thomas Brock (March 1, 1847 - August 22, 1922) was a British sculptor. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Tsarskoye Selo (Царское Село in Russian, may be translated as “Tsar’s Village”), a former residence of the royal families and visiting nobility 24 km south of St. ... The Palace of the Vatican, also called the Papal Palace or the Apostolic Palace, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... “Palacio Real” redirects here. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... For other uses, see Forbidden City (disambiguation). ... The Potala Palace (Tibetan: པོ་ཏ་ལ།) located in Lhasa, Tibet Autonomous Region, China, was the chief residence of the Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to Dharamsala, India after a failed uprising in 1959. ...


During World War I the palace, then the home of King George V and Queen Mary, escaped unscathed. Its more valuable contents were evacuated to Windsor but the Royal family remained in situ. The largest change to court life at this time was that the Government persuaded the King to ostentatiously and publicly lock the wine cellars and refrain from alcohol for the duration of the war, to set a good example to the supposedly inebriated lower classes. The lower classes continued to imbibe and the King was left reputedly furious at his enforced abstinence.[25] The King's children were photographed at this time serving tea to wounded officers in the adjacent Royal Mews. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


During World War II, the palace fared worse: it was bombed no less than seven times, and was a deliberate target, as it was thought by the Nazis that the destruction of Buckingham Palace would demoralise the nation. The most serious and publicised bombing was the destruction of the palace chapel in 1940: coverage of this event was played in cinemas all over England to show the common suffering of rich and poor. One bomb fell in the palace quadrangle while King George VI and Queen Elizabeth were in residence, and many windows were blown in and the chapel destroyed.[26] War time coverage of such incidents was severely restricted, however, The King and Queen were filmed inspecting their bombed home, the smiling Queen, as always, immaculately dressed in a hat and matching coat seemingly unbothered by the damage around her. It was at this time the Queen famously declared: "I'm glad we have been bombed. Now I can look the East End in the face". The Royal family were seen as sharing their subjects' hardship, as The Sunday Graphic reported: Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... National Socialism redirects here. ...

By the Editor: The King and Queen have endured the ordeal which has come to their subjects. For the second time a German bomber has tried to bring death and destruction to the home of Their Majesties……..When this war is over the common danger which King George and Queen Elizabeth have shared with their people will be a cherished memory and an inspiration through the years".[27]

On September 15, 1940 an RAF pilot, Ray Holmes, rammed a German plane attempting to bomb the palace.[28] Holmes had run out of ammunition and made the quick choice to ram it. Both planes crashed and their pilots survived. This incident was captured on film. The plane's engine was later exhibited at the Imperial War Museum in London. Following the war the British pilot became a King's Messenger. He died at the age of 90 in 2005. is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ray Holmes (1915 – 27 June 2005) was a British fighter pilot who was feted as a war hero who saved Buckingham Palace from being severely damaged by German bombing during the Battle of Britain. ... Queens Messengers are couriers employed by the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office. ...


On VE Day —May 8, 1945— the palace was the centre of British celebrations, with the King, Queen and the Princess Elizabeth, the future Queen, and Princess Margaret appearing on the balcony, with the palace's blacked-out windows behind them, to the cheers from a vast crowd in the Mall. Churchill waves to crowds in Whitehall on the day he broadcast to the nation that the war with Germany had been won, 8 May 1945. ... HRH The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret (Margaret Rose Armstrong-Jones, née Windsor; (August 21, 1930—February 9, 2002) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and sister of the... The Mall, looking towards Buckingham Palace The Mall (/mæl/) in London is the road running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end, where it crosses Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and for...


21st century: Royal use and public access

The Royal Family on the balcony
The Royal Family on the balcony

Today, Buckingham Palace is not only the weekday home of the Queen and Prince Philip but also the London residence of the Duke of York and the Earl and Countess of Wessex. The palace also houses the offices of the Royal Household and is the workplace of 450 people. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1287x908, 199 KB) Summary Photo of balcony of Buckingham palace, london, UK, showing royal family. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1287x908, 199 KB) Summary Photo of balcony of Buckingham palace, london, UK, showing royal family. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... In all the medieval monarchies of western Europe the general system of government sprang from, and centred in, the royal household. ...


Every year some 50,000 invited guests are entertained at garden parties, receptions, audiences, and banquets. The Garden Parties, usually three, are held in the summer, usually in July. The Forecourt of Buckingham Palace is used for Changing of the Guard, a major ceremony and tourist attraction (daily during the summer months; every other day during the winter). For other uses, see Garden party (disambiguation). ... Contents // Categories: Stub | London attractions ...


The palace is not the monarch's private property; both Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace and their art collections belong to the nation. The furnishings, paintings, fittings and other artefacts, many by Fabergé, from Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle are known collectively as the Royal Collection; owned by the nation, they can be viewed by the public. The Queen's Gallery near the Royal Mews is open all year and displays a changing selection of items from the collection. The rooms containing the Queen's Gallery are on the site of the former chapel, which was damaged by one of the seven bombs to fall on the palace during World War II. The palace's state rooms have been open to the public during August and September since 1993. The money raised in entry fees was originally put towards the rebuilding of Windsor Castle following the 1992 fire which destroyed many of its state rooms. This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Bouquet of Lilies or Madonna Lily Egg by Fabergé Peter Carl Fabergé original name Carl Gustavovich Fabergé(May 30, 1846–September 24, 1920) was a Russian jeweller, best known for the fabulous Fabergé eggs, made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than... Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ... The Queens Gallery is a public art gallery located at Buckingham Palace, home of the British monarch, in London. ... The Royal Mews is the mews (stables and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family in London. ... A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ...


Thus, Buckingham Palace is a symbol and home of the British monarchy, an art gallery and tourist attraction. Behind the gilded railings and gates which were made by the Bromsgrove Guild[29] and Webb's famous facade which has been described as looking "like everybody's idea of a palace" the large staff employed by the Royal Household work to keep Britain's constitutional monarchy functioning.


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Buckingham Palace Garden Buckingham Palace Garden or, to give it its full title, The Garden at Buckingham Palace, is the garden situated at the rear of Buckingham Palace. ... Sentry of the Grenadier Guards posted outside St Jamess Palace The Queens Guard and Queens Life Guard are the names given to contingents of infantry and cavalry soldiers charged with guarding the official royal residences in London. ... The Royal Mews is the mews (stables and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family in London. ... The Queens Gallery is a public art gallery located at Buckingham Palace, home of the British monarch, in London. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... This is a list of residences occupied by the British Royal family, noting the seasons of the year they are traditionally occupied. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Royal Standard flies over the Palace when the sovereign is in residence Flags at Buckingham Palace vary according the movements of court and tradition. ... Downing Street Downing Street gates Downing Street is the street in London which contains the buildings that have been, for over two hundred years, the official residences of two of the most senior British cabinet ministers, the First Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Prime Minister of...

Notes

  1. ^ Traditionally the British Royal Court is still resident at St. James's Palace. While foreign ambassadors assuming their new position are received by the British sovereign at Buckingham Palace, they are in fact accredited to the "Court of St. James's Palace". This anomaly continues for the sake of tradition as Buckingham Palace is to all intents and purposes the official residence.
  2. ^ The topography of the site and its ownership are dealt with in Wright, chapters 1-4
  3. ^ Wright, pp. 76-8
  4. ^ Audley and Davies were key figures in the development of Ebury Manor and also the Grosvenor Estate (see Dukes of Westminster), which still exists today. (They are remembered in North Audley Street, South Audley Street, and Davies Street, all in Mayfair.)
  5. ^ Wright, p.83
  6. ^ Wright, p. 96.
  7. ^ Nash, p. 18, although the purchase price is given by Wright p. 142 as £28,000
  8. ^ Kid's Zone:The Gold State Coach. The official website of the British Monarchy. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  9. ^ Woodham-Smith, p 249
  10. ^ Woodham-Smith, p 249
  11. ^ Harris, de Bellaigue & Miller, p 33.
  12. ^ Hedley, p 19
  13. ^ Robinson, p 9.
  14. ^ See reference on official British monarchy website [1]
  15. ^ Harris, de Bellaigue & Miller, p p 93
  16. ^ Harris, de Bellaigue & Miller, p 91
  17. ^ Hedley, pp 16 -17
  18. ^ Advice given by HM's representatives
  19. ^ Mailbox. Royal Insight Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  20. ^ Blaikie, Thomas (2002). You look awfully like the Queen: Wit and Wisdom from the House of Windsor. London: Harper Collins. ISBN 0-00-714874-7
  21. ^ Hedley, p 16.
  22. ^ Robinson, p 49
  23. ^ Robinson (Page 9) asserts that the decorations, including plaster swags and other decorative motifs, are "finicky" and "at odds with Nash's original detailing".
  24. ^ Robinson. Page 11
  25. ^ Rose, Kenneth (1983). King George V. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0297782452. 
  26. ^ Hedley, p.
  27. ^ The Sunday Graphic, September 18, 1939, p. 1
  28. ^ "Pilot who 'saved Palace' honoured" 2 November 2005, BBC News. Retrieved 25 April 2007.
  29. ^ Robinson, p 9.

St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Arms of the Dukes of Westminster (since 1825) The title of Duke of Westminster was created by Queen Victoria in 1874 and bestowed upon Richard Grosvenor, the 3rd Marquess of Westminster. ... Mayfair is an area in the City of Westminster London, named after the fortnight-long May Fair that took place there from 1686 until it was banned in that location in 1764. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Vivian Rose (b. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

References

  • Blaikie, Thomas (2002). You look awfully like the Queen: Wit and Wisdom from the House of Windsor. London: Harper Collins. ISBN 0-00-714874-7.
  • Harris, John; de Bellaigue, Geoffrey; & Miller, Oliver (1968). Buckingham Palace. London:Nelson. ISBN 0-17-141011-4
  • Hedley, Olwen (1971) The Pictorial History of Buckingham Palace. Pitkin, ISBN 0-85372-086-X
  • Nash, Roy (1980). Buckingham Palace: The Place and the People. London: Macdonald Futura. ISBN 0-354-04529-6
  • Robinson, John Martin (1999). Buckingham Palace. Published by The Royal Collection, St. James's Palace, London ISBN 1-902163-36-2.
  • Williams, Neville (1971). Royal Homes. Lutterworth Press. ISBN 0-7188-0803-7.
  • Woodham-Smith, Cecil (1973). Queen Victoria (vol 1) Hamish Hamilton Ltd.
  • Wright, Patricia (1999; first published 1996). The Strange History of Buckingham Palace. Stroud, Gloucs.: Sutton Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7509-1283-9

Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ...

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Occupied: Bagshot ParkBalmoral CastleBirkhallBuckingham PalaceClarence HouseGatcombe Park • Highgrove • Hillsborough Castle • Holyrood Palace • St. James's PalaceKensington PalaceSandringham HouseThatched House LodgeWindsor Castle
Historical: Palace of BeaulieuBeaumont PalaceBridewell PalaceBrantridge ParkCumberland LodgeDunfermline PalaceEltham PalaceFalkland PalaceFort BelvedereHampton Court PalaceKew PalaceLinlithgow PalaceMarlborough HouseCastle of MeyNonsuch PalaceOsborne HousePalace of PlacentiaQueen's HouseRichmond PalaceRoyal PavilionSavoy PalaceTower of LondonPalace of WestminsterPalace of WhitehallWoodstock Palace

Coordinates: 51°30′03.74″N, 00°08′32.90″W Image File history File links Royal_Standard_of_England. ... This is a list of residences occupied by the British Royal family, noting the seasons of the year they are traditionally occupied. ... Image File history File links Royal_Standard_of_Scotland. ... Bagshot Park circa 1880. ... Balmoral Castle. ... Birkhall is a 53,000 acre estate in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... Gatcombe Park is the private country home of Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, situated between the Gloucestershire villages of Minchinhampton and Avening, five miles south of Stroud. ... Highgrove is the country home of HRH The Prince of Wales, in Gloucestershire. ... The official entrance of Hillsborough Castle Hillsborough Castle in County Down is a mansion in Northern Ireland. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... Sandringham House is a country house on 8000 acres (32 km²) of land near the village of Sandringham, Norfolk, which is privately owned by the British Royal Family. ... Thatched House Lodge is a royal residence in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in London, England. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... The Palace of Beaulieu also known as New Hall was located in Essex, England, north of Chelmsford. ... Beaumont Palace Oxford was built by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace. ... The Pass Room at Bridewell from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808–1811), drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin. ... Brantridge Park, Balcombe, West Sussex, is one of the lesser royal residences. ... Built 1650 in Windsor Great Park, south of Royal Lodge, Cumberland Lodge was called Byfield House till 1670. ... Dunfermline Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Dunfermline, Fife. ... Eltham Palace Eltham Palace is a large house in Eltham, London, United Kingdom (Map Ref: TQ424740 , ), currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... Falkland Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Falkland, Fife. ... Fort Belvedere Fort Belvedere is a country house on Shrubs Hill in Windsor Great Park, very near Sunningdale, Berkshire, but actually over the border in the borough of Runnymede in Surrey. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Three buildings at Kew, which is now a western suburb of London, have been known as Kew Palace. ... The south face of Linlithgow Palace Linlithgow Palace from the east North and west faces of Linlithgow Palace The ruins of Linlithgow Palace are situated in the town of Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland, 15 miles west of Edinburgh. ... Marlborough House, London Marlborough House is a mansion in Westminster, London. ... The Castle of Mey (formerly Barrogill Castle) is in dramatic situation on the north coast of Scotland, about 6 miles west of John OGroats. ... Nonsuch Palace was a Tudor royal palace that was built by Henry VIII in Surrey, on the location of Cuddington, near Epsom (the church and village of Cuddington were destroyed to create the plot for the palace). ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, UK. // History The house was built between 1845 and 1851 for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... The Queens House, Greenwich The Queens House, Greenwich, was designed and begun in 1616-1617 by architect Inigo Jones for Anne of Denmark (the queen of King James I of England) and completed, also by Jones, about 1635 for Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I. The... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... Brighton Pavilion redirects here. ... The Savoy Palace was considered the grandest noblemans residence of medieval London, until it was destroyed in the uprising of 1381. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. ... Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the Oxfordshire town of Woodstock. ... Image File history File links LinkFA-star. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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The Royal Residences > Buckingham Palace (146 words)
Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain's sovereigns since 1837.
It evolved from a town house that was owned from the beginning of the eighteenth century by the Dukes of Buckingham.
Although in use for the many official events and receptions held by The Queen, areas of Buckingham Palace are opened to visitors on a regular basis.
Buckingham Palace at AllExperts (6635 words)
Originally known as Buckingham House, the building forming the core of today's palace was formerly a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence.
Buckingham House, as it was known, was eventually sold by Buckingham's descendant, Sir Charles Sheffield, in 1762 to King George III for £21,000.
James's Palace remained the official and ceremonial royal residence; indeed, the tradition continues to date of foreign ambassadors being formally accredited to "the Court of St. James's", even though it is at Buckingham Palace that they present their credentials and staff to the Queen upon their appointment.
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