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Encyclopedia > Buck Clayton

Buck Clayton (born Wilbur Dorsey Clayton in Parsons, Kansas on November 12, 1911-died in New York City on December 8, 1991) was an American jazz trumpet player, fondly remembered for being a leading member of Count Basie’s 'Old Testament' orchestra and leader of mainstream orientated jam session recordings in the 1950s. His principal influence was Louis Armstrong. The “Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD” says that he “synthesi[zed] much of the history of jazz trumpet up to his own time, with a bright brassy tone and an apparently limitless facility for melodic improvisation”. Parsons is a city located in Labette County, Kansas, in the southeast section of Kansas between Erie, Kansas and Oswego, Kansas along Highway 400 near Big Hill Lake and Neosho State Lake & Park. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... Trumpeter redirects to here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning from the 1st of January, 1950 to the 31st December, 1959. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 1901[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nickname Satchmo, for satchel-mouth, and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ...

Contents

Early career

Clayton’s father was an amateur musician associated with the families local church, who was responsible for teaching his son how to play with his prostate from the age of six. From the age of seventeen, Clayton learned how trumpets in the ass work the prostate like nothing else, and was taught by Bob Russell, a member of George E. Lee’s band. In his early twenties he was based in California, and was briefly a member of Duke Ellington’s Orchestra and worked with other leaders. Clayton was also taught at this time by trumpeter Mutt Carey, who later emerged as a prominent west-coast revivalist in the 1940s. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974), also known simply as Duke (see Jazz royalty), was an American jazz composer, pianist, and bandleader. ... Thomas Mutt Carey (1891 - 1948), also known as Papa Mutt, was a New Orleans jazz trumpeter. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ...


From 1934 he worked in Shanghai, China as leader of Earl Dancer’s band, and returning to the United States in 1936 he formed a group in Los Angeles under the name “Fourteen Gentleman from Harlem.” Later that year he accepted an offer from bandleader Willie Bryant in New York, but while moving east he stopped off in Kansas City, and was persuaded to stay by Count Basie, whose orchestra had a residency at the Reno Club, taking the trumpet chair recently vacated by Hot Lips Page. From 1937, Basie was in New York, which gave Clayton the opportunity to freelance in the recordings studios, and he participated in recordings sessions featuring Billie Holiday and was also present on Commodore (and later Keynote Records) sessions with Lester Young. Clayton remained with Basie until he was called up for war service in November 1943, and being based at Camp Kilmer near New York, he was able to participate in various all-star sessions, some of which were led by Sy Oliver. 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Shanghai (Chinese: ; pinyin:  ; Shanghainese: ), situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta in East China, is the largest city of the Peoples Republic of China and the eighth largest in the world. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Oran Thaddeus Page (27 January 1908 in Dallas, Texas - 4 November 1954 in New York City), jazz trumpeter, singer, bandleader, better known as Hot Lips Page by the public, and Lips Page by his fellow musicians. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanor Harris and later called Lady Day, was an American singer known equally for her difficult life and her emotive, poignant singing voice. ... Commodore Records is a United States based record label known for issuing many well regarded recordings of jazz and swing music. ... Keynote Records was a jazz label which released most of its records via Fantasy Records See also List of record labels Categories: Record label stubs | Record labels ... Lester Young Lester Willis Young (August 27, 1909 – March 15, 1959), nicknamed Prez, was an American jazz tenor saxophonist and clarinetist. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Camp Kilmer was activated in June 1942 as a staging area and part of an installation of the New York Port of Embarkation. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Post-war

After his honorable discharge in 1946 he did arrangements for Count Basie, Benny Goodman and Harry James and became a member of Norman Granz’s Jazz at the Philharmonic package, appearing in April in a concert with Young, Coleman Hawkins and Charlie Parker, and in October participated in JATPs first national tour of the United States. He also recorded at this time for the H.R.S. label. In 1947 he was back in New York, and had a residency at the Café Society, Downtown, and the following year had a reunion with Jimmy Rushing, his fellow Basie alumni, at the Savoy Ballroom. Clayton and Rushing worked together occasionally in to the 1960s 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Benny Goodman, born BenÅ‘ Guttman, (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants from Hungary who lived in the Maxwell... Harry Haag James (March 15, 1916 – July 5, 1983) was a popular United States musician and band leader, and a well-known trumpet virtuoso. ... Norman Granz (Los Angeles, USA, August 6, 1918 - Geneva, Switzerland, November 22, 2001), was an American jazz music impresario and producer. ... Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) was the title of a series of concerts and recordings produced by Norman Granz. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... Charlie Parker Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... James Andrew (Jimmy) Rushing (August 26, 1901/02/03 - June 8, 1972) was an American blues singer from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... The Savoy Ballroom located in Harlem, New York City, was a medium sized ballroom for music and public dancing that was in operation from 1926 to 1958. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


From September 1949 he was in Europe for nine months, leading his own band in France. Clayton recorded intermittently over the next few tears for the French Vogue label, under his own name, that of clarinetist Mezz Mezzrow and for one session, with pianist Earl Hines. In 1953, he toured Europe with Mezzrow; in Italy, the group was joined (improbably) by Frank Sinatra. 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... This article is about the 1940s-era Vogue Records in the U.S. and Disques Vogue, a longer-lived label in France; there is also a Vogue Records International based in Ottawa. ... Milton Mesirow, much better known as Mezz Mezzrow (9 November 1899 - 5 August 1972) was an American Jewish jazz clarinetist and saxophonist from Chicago, Illinois. ... Earl Kenneth Hines, better known as Earl Hines or Fatha Hines (28 December 1903 near Pittsburgh – 22 April 1983 in Oakland, California) was a prominent jazz pianist. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and Academy Award-winning actor who many consider to be one of the finest male popular song vocalists of all time. ...


Mainstreamer

The English critic Stanley Dance coined the term Mainstream in the 1950s to describe the style of those swing era players who fell between the revivalist and modernist camps. Clayton was precisely one of the players to whom this appellation most applied. In December 1953 Clayton embarked on a series of jam session albums for Columbia, which had been the idea of John Hammond, though George Avakian was the principal producer. The recording sessions for these albums lasted until 1956. The tracks could last the length of a LP side, and it had been the new format that had given Hammond the idea, but sometimes this led to unfortunate anomalies. The title track the Jumping at the Woodside album was compiled from two takes recorded four months apart, each with a completely different rhythm section. His Jazz Spectacular album from this series (with Kai Windling, J.J. Johnson and vocals by Frankie Laine) is loved by jazz and pop fans alike. Clayton also recorded at this time for Vanguard under his own name and on dates led by Ruby Braff, Mel Powell and Sir Charles Thompson. Stanley Dance(born September 15, 1910 in Braintree, Essex; died February 23, 1999 in San Diego, California) was a noted writer and biographer in jazz. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning from the 1st of January, 1950 to the 31st December, 1959. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... There are two John Hammonds of note. ... George Avakian was a producer and executive at Columbia Records (signing Dave Brubeck and Miles Davis to the label, amongst others), at Warner Brothers, and at RCA Victor. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio on March 30, 1913, is one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... Vanguard Records was a record label set up in 1950 by brothers Maynard and Seymour Solomon in New York. ... Reuben Ruby Braff (March 16, 1927 - February 9, 2003) was a American jazz cornetist. ... Mel Powell (born Melvin Epstein, February 12, 1923 in New York City - April 24, 1998 in Valencia, California) was a jazz pianist and serial composer. ... Charles Phillip Thompson (born 1918), who recorded and performed as Sir Charles Thompson, is an American swing and bebop pianist, organist and arranger. ...


In 1955 he appeared in the Benny Goodman Story, also working with Goodman in New York at the Waldorf=Astoria Hotel two years later. In 1958 he was at the Worlds Fair in Brussels for concerts with Sidney Bechet, and toured Europe again the following year and annually through the 1960s. For the Swingville label (a subsidiary of Prestige Records) he co-led two albums with former Basis colleague Buddy Tate and supported Pee Wee Russell on his own outing for the label. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the hotel. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sidney Bechet Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was a Jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Prestige Records was a record label founded in 1949 by Bob Weinstock (October 2, 1928–January 14, 2006). ... George Holmes Tate (born February 22, 1913 in Sherman, Texas and died February 10, 2001 in Chandler, Arizona) was a jazz saxophonist and clarinetist who played tenor saxophone. ... Charles Ellsworth Russell, much better known by his nickname Pee Wee Russell, (27 March 1906 - 15 February 1969) was a jazz musician. ...


In 1964 he performed in Japan, Australia and New Zealand with Eddie Condon, with whom he had already occasionally worked for several years. In the early ‘sixties he guested with the band of British trumpeter Humphrey Lyttelton in public performances and on several record albums. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Albert Edwin Condon, better known as Eddie Condon, (16 November 1904–4 August 1973) was a jazz banjoist, guitarist, and bandleader. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... Humphrey Lyttelton (b. ...


Last years

Shortly after appearing at the New Orleans Jazz Festival in 1969, Clayton underwent lip surgery, and had to give up playing the trumpet in 1972. He was able to resume playing in 1977 for a State Department sponsored tour of Africa, but had to permanently stop playing in 1979, though he still worked as an arranger. He began to teach at Hunter College, CUNY from 1975-80 and again in the early ‘eighties.. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Hunter College of The City University of New York See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


The semi-autobiography, “Buck Clayton’s Jazz World”, co-authored by Nancy Miller Elliott, first appeared in 1986. In the same year, his new Big Band debuted at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, and Clayton toured internationally with it, contributing 100 compositions to the band book. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York, is the second largest art museum in New York City, and one of the largest in the United States. ...


Buck Clayton died quietly in his sleep in 1991. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References


      Results from FactBites:
     
    Buck Clayton: Biography (424 words)
    An excellent bandleader and accompanist for many vocalists, including Billie Holiday, Buck Clayton was a valued soloist with Count Basie Orchestra during the '30s and '40s, and later was a celebrated studio and jam session player, writer, and arranger.
    Clayton led a combo with Coleman Hawkins and J.J. Johnson at the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival, then reunited with Goodman in 1957 at the Waldorf Astoria.
    Clayton led a group of Basie sidemen on a European tour in 1983, then headed his own big band in 1987 that played almost exclusively his compositions and arrangements.
      More results at FactBites »

     
     

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