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Encyclopedia > Bubble Tea
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Pearl milk tea typically found in Taiwan
Pearl milk tea typically found in Taiwan

Bubble tea is a tea beverage that originated in Taiwan[1] in the 1980s. The term "bubble" refers to the tapioca balls in the drink. These chewy tapioca balls, or "pearls," are consumed along with the beverage through a wide straw. Bubble tea is especially popular in many East Asian and Southeast Asian regions such as Taiwan, Brunei, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam and Australia. Image File history File links Zhongwen. ... Japanese name Kanji: Kana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Hantu: A Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, sometimes Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ... Download high resolution version (1316x1888, 1634 KB)Pearl milk tea: taken by Richy of Chinese Wikipedia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1316x1888, 1634 KB)Pearl milk tea: taken by Richy of Chinese Wikipedia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids. ... For other uses, see Tapioca (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tapioca (disambiguation). ... Freshadama grade cultured freshwater pearls. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...

Contents

Description

Bubble tea is a mixture of iced or hot sweetened tea, milk, and often other flavorings. The distinctive characteristics of bubble tea are the black gummy balls made of tapioca (or, more commonly in East Asia, yam starch), called "pearls" or "boba" or balls that sit at the bottom of the cup. The pearls are larger than those found in tapioca pudding, with a diameter of at least 6 millimeters, but smaller ones are occasionally used. They are generally translucent brown with a darker brown center, although pearls of other colors or 'jelly cubes' have also recently become available. Tapioca pudding is a common pudding with tapioca pearls added to a vanilla pudding. ...


The original bubble tea consisted of a hot Taiwanese black tea, tapioca pearls, condensed milk, and honey. As this drink became more popular, variations were created. Initially iced versions with a hint of peach or plum flavoring began to appear, then more fruit flavors were added until, in some variations, the tea was removed entirely in favor of real fruits. Today you can find shops entirely devoted to bubble tea, similar to juice bars of the early 1990s. They usually contain colored pearls that are chosen to match whatever fruit juice is used, in addition to brightly colored oversize straws for sucking up the pearls. Several Taiwanese snacks bought from food stalls at the Shilin Night Market, Taipei. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Bubble tea is generally split into two types: fruit-flavored teas, and milk teas. Milk teas may use dairy or non-dairy creamers. Non-dairy creamer is a substance used as a substitute for milk or cream as an addition to coffee or other beverages. ...


The mixtures that make up bubble tea vary. Several examples of flavors are strawberry, passion fruit, mango, chocolate, and coconut, and may be added in the form of powder, fruit juice, pulp, or syrup to hot black or green tea, which is shaken in a cocktail shaker or mixed in a blender with ice until chilled. The mixture is usually combined with milk and cooked tapioca pearls. A cocktail shaker is a device consisting of a container and a lid, with a strainer, used to mix beverages (usually alcoholic) by shaking. ... An electric blender. ...


Bubble tea bars often serve bubble tea using a machine to seal the top of the cup with plastic cellophane. This allows the tea to be shaken in the serving cup. The cellophane is then pierced with a straw. Other cafés use plastic dome-shaped lids. Even fruit slushes and smoothies can have boba added to the the drinks.


These tapioca pearls are made mostly of tapioca starch, which comes from the tapioca, or bitter-cassava plant. In other parts of the world, the bitter-cassava plant may be called manioca or yuca. Cassava is native to South America, and was introduced to Asia in the 1800s. The balls are prepared by boiling for 25 minutes, until they are cooked thoroughly but have not lost pliancy, then cooled for 25 minutes. After cooking they last about 7 hours. The pearls have little taste, and are usually soaked in sugar or honey solutions. For other uses, see Tapioca (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Crantz The cassava, casava, yuca or manioc (Manihot esculenta) is a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) native to South America that is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates. ...


Variants

An alternative to the traditional tapioca balls are green pearls. Green pearls, as their name implies, are green tapioca balls. They have a small hint of green tea flavor, and are chewier than the traditional tapioca balls. Alternatives to tapioca balls in general are egg pudding, pieces of aloe,coconut jelly or konjac jelly. The jelly is served in small cubes or rectangular strips, and has a pliant, chewy consistency. They may be ordered 'half and half,' in a drink with half pearls and half jelly. There are also other jellies such as lychee jelly, coffee jelly, and rainbow jelly, a fruit mixture sometimes known as composite jelly. Green tea (绿茶) is tea that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. ... Nata de Coco, a high fiber, zero fat Filipino dessert. ... Binomial name Amorphophallus konjac K. Koch Konjac (Amorphophallus konjac; syn. ...


Culture

When ordering, customers may be asked whether they want 'pearls' or 'boba' in their drinks, and both terms refer to the tapioca balls. The tapioca pearls require an hour for preparation, and they expand considerably when cooked. After they are cooked through but before they become too soft, the pearls are drained and poured into a sugar-water solution, and are ready for use.


Some cafes use a non-dairy milk substitute, instead of milk because many East Asians are lactose intolerant. [2] This adds a distinct flavor and consistency to the drink.


As time has moved on new generations of bubble drinks have come into being, such as, the 'Snow Bubble.' This 'Snow Bubble' drink is a slushie-like drink where you choose one of many fruit flavors and it is mixed in with shaved ice to make a smooth refreshing drink, after that the boba balls can be added from their assorted types, black boba which are the original, colored, lychee bubbles, and rainbow boba; some of the many that are offered today.


Availability

Bubble tea is available at small dedicated cafes and some restaurants. Most bubble tea shops serve a variety of drinks, including coffee, juices, fruit smoothies, and fruit freezes, which are sometimes also called bubble tea, though they do not contain any tea ingredients. These drinks can include flavors less familiar to non-Asians, such as taro, honeydew, or lychee, as well as the more familiar chocolate, Ovaltine, Milo (in Australia), Horlicks (in England), or strawberry. Hot bubble tea with pearls are also common, though coconut or konjac jelly are usually not added to hot drinks. A cup of coffee. ... Binomial name (L.) Schott Taro (from Tahitian or other Polynesian languages), more rarely kalo (from Hawaiian), is a tropical plant grown primarily as a vegetable food for its edible corm, and secondarily as a leaf vegetable. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Sonn. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... Ovaltine is a brand of sweetened milk flavoring product made with sugar (except in Switzerland), malt extract, cocoa, and whey. ... Milo differs among regions, as is seen in this side-by-side comparison of Milo from New Zealand and Ghana. ... For information on the famous racehorse: Horlicks Horlicks is the name of a company and a malted milk hot drink claimed to promote sleep when drank at bedtime. ... Species 20+ species; see text The strawberry (Fragaria) is a genus of plants in the family Rosaceae and the fruit of these plants. ...


History

There are two shops that claim to be the first creator of Bubble Tea. One is Liu Han Chie who worked in Chun Shui Tang teahouse Taichung City, Taiwan in the early 1980s, and experimented with cold milk tea by adding fruit, syrup, candied yams, and tapioca balls. Although the drink was not popular at first, a Japanese television show generated interest among businessmen. The drink became well-known in most parts of East and Southeast Asia during the 1990s. Abbreviation: Central City (中市) City nickname: The cultural city Capital District West Dist. ... You may be looking for Hong Kong-style milk tea Bubble tea (also known as pearl milk tea) English tea This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. “Camote” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tapioca (disambiguation). ...


An alternative origin is the Hanlin Teahouse in Tainan City, Taiwan, owned by Tu Tsong He Hanlin Bubble tea is made by adding traditional white fenyuan which have an appearance of pearls, supposedly resulting in the so-called "pearl tea." Shortly after, Hanlin changed the white fenyuan to the black, as it is today. Tainan redirects here; for the county of the same name see Tainan County. ...


In the late 1990s, bubble tea began to gain popularity in the major North American cities with large Asian populations, especially those on the West Coast and East Coast and in Texas. The trend in the United States started by Lollicup in the city of San Gabriel, California and quickly spread throughout Southern California.[citation needed] The beverage has received much attention from mainstream American media, including covers on National Public Radio show Morning Edition and the Los Angeles Times. Bubble tea has spread internationally through Chinatowns and other overseas Asian communities. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Lollicup is a Taiwanese American fast food chain specializing in boba tea, coffee, espresso, a large variety of fruit juices and slushes, and a variety of other Asian-style cold and hot teas. ... San Gabriel City Hall San Gabriel is a city located in Los Angeles County, California. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... Morning Edition is an American radio news program produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the U.S., major chains such as Boba Bee in chicago are expanding into suburban areas, particularly those with large Asian populations. Bubble tea can also be found in major European cities such as London and Paris. Bubble tea is also gaining in popularity in Canada, particularly in and around the cities of Vancouver, British Columbia; Toronto, Ontario; and Montreal, Quebec where there are large Asian-Canadian communities. It is also gaining popularity in Australia, especially in Sydney and Melbourne where there are also high concentrations of Asian immigrants and descendants. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... It has been suggested that List of visitor attractions in Paris be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour Without Sunset (diminishment)) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th - Total 944,735... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... , Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ...


Names

The Chinese term for bubble tea is actually "Pearl milk tea" (Traditional Chinese: 珍珠奶茶; Hanyu Pinyin: zhēnzhū nǎichá; Tongyong Pinyin: jhenjhu nǎichá). "Bubble Tea" in Chinese actually refers to a modern method of beverage preparation: to efficiently and homogenously mix various ingredients in these drinks (e.g., sugar, powdered milk, tea, and ice), drink makers often shake the tea up as bartenders do with cocktails. Thusly prepared, a layer of foam forms on the surface, and any tea so prepared can be called bubble tea. "Foam black tea" (Traditional Chinese: 泡沫紅茶; Simplified Chinese: 泡沫红茶; Pinyin: pàomò hóngchá; literally "bubble black tea") and "foam green tea" (Traditional Chinese: 泡沫綠茶; Simplified Chinese: 泡沫绿茶; Hanyu Pinyin: pàomò lǜchá; Tongyong Pinyin: pàomò lyùchá;literally "bubble green tea") are also common drinks made by shaking sweetened tea. After pearl milk tea was brought to non-Asian countries, it was given the name "bubble tea." Since the most notable difference between bubble tea and other tea is the tapioca at the bottom of the drink, some assumed that the "bubble" in "bubble tea" referred to these pearls, though the frothy layer created from shaking the drink is what gives "foam (or bubble) tea" its name. The pearls in "pearl milk tea," however, do refer to the tapioca "pearls." Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ... Black tea Black tea is more oxidized than the green, oolong and white varieties; all four varieties are made from leaves of Camellia sinensis. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Green tea (绿茶) is tea that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ...


Different names

Bubble (milk) tea has many other names, including:


Chinese

  • 泡沫紅茶 (Pinyin: pàomò hóngchá): "bubble black tea", used mainly in Taiwan
  • 泡沫奶茶 (Pinyin: pàomò nǎichá): "bubble milk tea", used mainly in Taiwan
  • 珍珠奶茶 or 珍奶) (Hanyu Pinyin: zhēnzhū nǎichá; Tongyong Pinyin: jhenjhu nǎichá): "pearl milk tea", in Taiwanese (Min Nan) and Chinese usage
  • 波霸奶茶 (Hanyu Pinyin: bōbà nǎichá; Tongyong Pinyin: bobà nǎichá): "large pearls milk tea", used mainly in southern Taiwan for the large-pearl kind; tea with smaller pearls is called "pearl milk tea"
  • 黑珍珠奶茶 (Hanyu Pinyin: hēi zhēnzhū nǎichá; Tongyong Pinyin: hei jhenjhu nǎichá): "black pearl milk tea" (less common)
  • (奶)茶珍珠 (Hanyu Pinyin: (nǎi) chá zhēnzhū; Tongyong Pinyin: (nǎi) chá jhenjhu): "(milk) tea pearl" (less common)

Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Tongyong Pinyin (Chinese: ; pinyin: Tōngyòng pÄ«nyÄ«n; literally Universal/General Usage Sound-combining) is the current official romanization of the Chinese language adopted by the national government (although not all local governments) of the Republic of China (Taiwan) since 2002. ...

English

  • pearl (milk) tea or drink
  • tapioca milk tea drink
  • milk pearl tea or drink
  • black pearl (milk) tea or drink
  • (milk) tea pearl
  • boba (milk) tea or drink
  • Chooba tea or drink
  • tapioca (milk) tea or drink
  • bubble tea
  • bubble milk

Others

  • Trà sữa trân châu (Vietnamese): literally "pearl milk tea"
  • 보바 드링크, 보바 티, 버블티 (Korean): literally "Boba drink/tea", "bubble tea"
  • タピオカティー (Japanese): transliterated "tapioca tea"
  • ชาไข่มุก, ชามุก (Thai): literally "pearl tea"
  • SAGO (Tagalog): literally "tapioca pearls" (Sago at Gulaman "Tapioca Pearls & Agar-Agar Jelly" are the popular version of Bubble Tea in the Philippines)

Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ...

References

  1. ^ The History of Bubble Tea
  2. ^ Chao, Julie. "Taiwan tapioca tea on tap." San Francisco Examiner. December 12, 1999.

See also

General info


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bubble Tea-- Ellen's Kitchen -- Recipebox (889 words)
Bubble Tea is a colorful blend of sweetened tea or juice with sweetened cooked tapioca pearls or coconut jelly and often a creamy addition or flavoring syrup or powder, shaken until well mixed.
Bubble tea was originally named for the frothy bubbles that form when it is correctly mixed.
Put all ingredients except bubble tea tapioca pearls into a blender and blend until the fruits are liquified.
bubble tea, boba, tapioca pearl, milk tea: Bruce&Clark (762 words)
Bubble tea as a beverage is bold, daring, bordering almost on the blasphemous - when seen in the light of the history of tea.
The practice of drinking iced tea was born, and in the United States, almost 90% of the tea drunk is still in the form of iced tea.
To form the fl tapioca pearls for bubble tea, the tapioca starch is heated with water and caramel to a thick paste, which is then run through moist sieves to form pellets of different sizes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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