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Encyclopedia > Bubble Bobble
Bubble Bobble
Bubble Bobble flyer
Promotional USA flyer for the original arcade iteration of Bubble Bobble
Developer(s) Taito
Publisher(s) Taito and Romstar
Designer(s) Fukio Mitsuji
Release date(s) Arcade version
1986
X68000 version
JPN 1986
Amiga, Apple II, C64, MSX, Atari ST versions
1987
NES/FDS version
JPN October 30, 1987
NA November 28, 1988
EU October 26, 1990
SMS version
JPN 1988
AU 1992
MS-DOS version
NA 1989
Game Boy version
JPN December 7, 1990
NA 1991
Game Gear version
NA 1994
Genre(s) Platform game
Mode(s) Up to 2 players simultaneously
Platform(s) Arcade, NES, FDS, Sega Master System, Game Boy, Game Gear, PC:DOS, Commodore 64, Amiga, Apple II, MSX, Atari ST, Sharp X68000, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Mobile phone (Java)
Input Joystick (2-way); 2 buttons
Arcade cabinet Upright
Arcade display Raster, standard resolution 256×224 (horizontal), 256 colors

Bubble Bobble is an arcade game by Taito, first released in 1986. It was ported soon for numerous home computers and game consoles. The game features two Bubble Dragons, Bub (Japanese "Bubblun"), who is green with yellow spikes/horns and Bob (Japanese "Bobblun"), who is blue with cyan spikes/horns. Together, they journey through the Cave of Monsters to rescue their girlfriends. They move over a system of platforms, busting and pushing bubbles, avoiding enemies and collecting a variety of power-ups. Image File history File links Bubble_bobble. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... The Taito Corporation (タイトー株式会社, taitou kabushikigaisha) TYO: 9646 is a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Taito may mean: Taito Corporation, a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ... Romstar, Inc. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthem Advance Australia Fair Royal anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Canberra Largest city Sydney Official languages English (de facto 1) Government Federal constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Governor-General Michael Jeffery  -  Prime Minister John Howard Independence from the United Kingdom   -  Constitution 1 January 1901   -  Statute of... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Famicom Disk System, attached to a late-model AV Famicom The Family Computer Disk System (FCD) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... The Sega Master System (SMS for short) is an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Game Boy ) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo[1], released in 1989 at US$109 ISBN 0-9643848-5-X. The Game Boy was the first successful handheld console, and was the predecessor of all other iterations of the Game Boy line. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... The original Amiga 1000 (1985) with various peripherals The Amiga 500 (1987) was the most popular variant of the Amiga. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... Java is a programming language originally developed by Sun Microsystems and released in 1995. ... Joystick elements: 1. ... This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... The Taito Corporation (タイトー株式会社, taitou kabushikigaisha) TYO: 9646 is a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ... In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... The Nintendo GameCube is an example of a popular video game console. ... Soap bubbles Bubble may refer to: Soap bubble, spherical liquid film, also possibly of bubble gum Cavitation, pocket of air caught in a liquid Bubble (economics), where speculation causes prices to rise to unsustainable levels a (normally) transparent dome Light bulb, in theater lighting terminology [1] in poker tournaments, the... Power Up, the Professional Organization of Women in Entertainment Reaching Up is an organization with the stated mission to promote the visibility and integration of gay women in entertainment, the arts, and all forms of media. Power Up provided funding and assistance to the 2003 short film . ...

Contents

Game mechanics

The main reasons that many computer or game console ports of this game - even when released several years after the original - can seem lacking and incomplete in some aspects is because the original arcade game, despite its apparent simplicity, features some rather complicated and convoluted game mechanics.


Levels

Each level (or round) consists of one screen, with no scrolling or flipping. The dragons can move around the levels by walking on platforms, falling through empty space, jumping through platforms from below and (in some levels) falling through holes at the bottom of the level in order to reappear at the top, or even vice versa (see gameplay techniques below). This article needs cleanup. ...


Apart from jumping, the characters can blow bubbles. Bubbles also float in from the top or bottom of the screen in many levels. They pop after a certain amount of time, when they hit the dragon's spiked back, if they're squashed against a wall or another dragon or if they're fallen upon. By holding down the jump button, it's possible to bounce on top of bubbles, which is sometimes necessary to reach platforms. The main objective of the game is to trap enemies in bubbles, and burst them, destroying the enemies. Defeating several monsters at once awards exponentially increasing point awards. In mathematics, exponential growth (or geometric growth) occurs when the growth rate of a function is always proportional to the functions current size. ...


Each round also features invisible air currents and custom bubble physics, causing bubbles to move in predetermined trajectories, such as converging to a certain point, moving very quickly or very slowly, being pulled down as if by gravity, etc., usually with notable effects on a level's difficulty.


Some levels have very short bubble-popping times, meaning that bubbles pop almost as soon as they emerge. This becomes extreme in later levels to the point of only being able to kill monsters by "kissing" them (blowing a bubble in such a way that it's immediately squashed against the dragon, causing instant death to an enemy). Time limits are also used to increase the game's difficulty; two rounds having no time limit, some levels are almost impossible to finish under certain conditions (single player, lack of certain bonuses etc.). When the time limit expires, the player does not die instantly, but rather an invincible "Skel" (see below) enemy appears for each player, and all enemies become 'angry', with a change in colour and increase in speed.


Enemies

There are a variety of enemies that move about in different patterns. Contact with an enemy (or the missiles fired by some) will kill a dragon. The dragons' job is to complete the level by killing all enemies in it. If this is not achieved within a time limit, the message "Hurry up!" will flash across the screen. When this happens, enemies become "angry" (making them red and move faster thus making them more dangerous). Approximately ten seconds later, one or two Skel enemies appear on screen. Enemies also become "angry" if they escape from a bubble that is not burst quickly enough by one of the dragons. They may but not always calm down when one of the dragons dies. When in Super Mode, most enemies get swapped with a counterpart, e.g. PulPuls replace Monstas and vice versa.


There are 8 kinds of normal enemies, plus the final boss and two kinds of invincible monsters that appear after the "Hurry up!" limit, each with their own names. Roughly, in order of appearance in the Normal version of the game, they are[1]: Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is a particularly challenging computer-controlled character in video games. ...

  • Bubble Buster (Japanese "Zen-Chan") (Benzo in Europe): A box-shaped, clockwork walking monster with a medium moving speed and good jumping abilities. He's the first monster that appears in the game at stage 1. Interestingly, this monster also appears in the graphic tiles of the ROM of the arcade game Chack'n Pop, along with the Stoner and Beluga, but doesn't actually appear inside the game. Super Mode counterpart: Incendo.
  • Stoner (Japanese "Mighta") (Boris in Europe): A walking monster with red eyes who wears a white robe, much like a ghost. Has a medium moving speed, good jumping abilities and is able to shoot. First appearing in this game at stage 6, this monster actually first appeared in Taito's 1983 game Chack'n Pop. Super Mode counterpart: Willy Whistle.
  • Beluga (Japanese "Monsta") (Blubba in Europe): A flying blue/dark purple monster shaped roughly like a small whale. It flies fast but can only bounce off walls to change direction. First appearing in this game at stage 10, this monster actually first appeared in Chack'n Pop. Super Mode counterpart: Hullaballoon.
  • Hullaballoon (Japanese "Pulpul") (Boa Boa in Europe): A pink flying monster looking like a toy bear with a small rotor on his head. Flies around slowly but with greater control than the Beluga, and creeps in very small openings that other monsters and players cannot pass through, thus making it very dangerous in some rounds. It makes its debut at stage 20. (Super Mode counterpart of Beluga)
  • Coiley (Japanese "Banebou") (Bonnie-bo in Europe): A mushroom shaped-monster which can only move by making short jumps, having a single powerful spring instead of legs. It makes its first appearance at stage 30, and is the only monster who stays the same in Super Mode (he is not swapped with any other monster).
  • Incendo (Japanese "Hidegons", singular): A fast walking monster with shooting abilities, but poor jumping. Unlike the Stoner, he doesn't have to stop walking in order to shoot fireballs. He makes his first appearance at stage 40. (Super Mode counterpart of Bubble Buster)
  • Willy Whistle (Japanese "Drunk") (Bonner in Europe): A fast moving monster with good jumping capabilities, and able to throw a bottle which rebounds off walls and is re-caught by the thrower. He first appears at stage 50. The final boss is modelled after them, but is instead called Grumple Gromit or Super Drunk. (Super Mode counterpart of Stoner)
  • Super Socket (Japanese "Invader"): A robotic-looking monster, which behaves similarly to the enemies from the computer game, Space Invaders. Can only move left or right, and falls if it reaches the end of a platform. Shoots lasers downwards. It first appears in stage 49, but became infamous for stage 57 for the NES console. Although, it does not appear at all in the Super version of the game. (Incendo takes its place in Super Mode.)
  • Baron von Blubba (Japanese "Skel-Monsta"): It is the invincible monster that appears after the time limit for a round has expired (this limit can be as low as 1 or 2 seconds on some rounds, but there are two rounds with no time limit: round 94 and round 100). It looks similar to a white Monsta, but can only move vertically or horizontally at timed intervals. It can pass through walls, ceilings and floors, and speeds up until either the level is completed or a player is killed. In two-player mode, two Skels appear, each homing in on a particular player, although either player can be killed by touching either of the Skels. A Skel can also be dismissed by touching a player who has just been killed and is still flickering, and thus invincible. Another way to get rid of Skel is to pick up the flashing heart powerup (the only one which remains on the screen after the "Hurry up!" warning).
  • Rubblen[2] (Japanese "Rascal") appears in the secret diamond-filled rounds, which can be accessed by special bonuses that appear on rounds 20, 30 and 40 under certain conditions (explained in later section). Rubblen functions much like Baron von Blubba ("Skel-Monsta"); To trigger his presence, the player must remain idle for approximately 10 seconds. At this time, Rubblen will form and separate himself from the stone structure in the center of the room. Once he has been triggered, Rubblen will trail the player until he or she exits the area or gets hit. In addition, being attacked by Rubblen triggers several effects. First, if the player receives a Game Over within a Secret Room, the maximum "reached round" on the high score screen will be noted as "Round 102," "Round 103," or "Round 104." (Depending on the room the player dies in. For example, dying in Level 20's Secret Room will be noted as "Round 102," Level 30's is noted as "Round 103," and Level 40's will be "Round 104." Plus, when a New Game is started after this Game over, the player will be warped from Level 1 to the secret room he or she died on.
  • Grumple Gromit (Japanese "Super Drunk") is the end-game boss that appears in level 100. It is large, bounces off walls, and fires arcs of bottles. The level contains a magic potion that allows the players to breathe lightning bubbles. It becomes trapped in a bubble only after being struck by many lightning bolts. In Super Mode, the last boss is not the real Gromit, but Bub and Bob's parents who were turned into it by a mysterious villain (whose identity is revealed in Rainbow Islands). Before regaining their true forms, they change into a large bubble dragon (which is what ties them to said mysterious villain)

Image File history File links Benzo. ... Mission, or barrel, roof tiles A tile is a small, manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as clay or stone used for covering roofs, floors, and walls, or other objects such as tabletops. ... A ROM image, or simply ROM, is a computer file which contains a copy of the data from a read-only memory chip, often from a video game cartridge, a computers firmware, or from an arcade games main board. ... Chackn Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, considered to be an ancestor of Bubble Bobble due to the appearance of many similar enemies and Bubble Bobbles duplication of a Chackn Pop level. ... Image File history File links Ghost_(Bubble_Bobble)_(modified). ... An artists interpretation of a ghostly woman on a flight of stairs, based on common descriptions A ghost is usually defined as the apparition of a deceased person, frequently similar in appearance to that person, and encountered in places he or she frequented, or in association with the person... Chackn Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, considered to be an ancestor of Bubble Bobble due to the appearance of many similar enemies and Bubble Bobbles duplication of a Chackn Pop level. ... Image File history File links Blubba. ... A Fin Whale The term whale is ambiguous: it can refer to all cetaceans, to just the larger ones, or only to members of particular families within the order Cetacea. ... Chackn Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, considered to be an ancestor of Bubble Bobble due to the appearance of many similar enemies and Bubble Bobbles duplication of a Chackn Pop level. ... Image File history File links Boaboa. ... A rotor is the rotating part of a helicopter which generates lift, either vertically in the case of a main rotor, or horizontally in the case of a tail rotor. ... Image File history File links Mushroom. ... Helical or coil springs designed for tension A spring is a flexible elastic object used to store mechanical energy. ... Image File history File links Incendo. ... Image File history File links Drunk. ... Image File history File links Invader. ... Space Invaders is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Image File history File links Baron_(Bubble_Bobble)_(modified). ... Image File history File links Rascol. ... Big Boss in Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake. ...

Weapon

The dragons' main weapon is their ability to blow bubbles. After being blown, they shoot forward for a short distance, then start to float upwards or along a wind current. It is possible to jump on bubbles to reach otherwise inaccessible areas. An enemy hit by a forward-shooting (not floating) bubble will be trapped in it. The bubble can then be popped, killing the enemy and turning it into an item that can be collected for bonus points. If left floating, it will become angry and escape the bubble after a while. Popping an empty bubble scores 10 points.


Bonuses and events

A relatively unknown and obscure part of Bubble Bobble gameplay has always been the way the various bonuses appear. While most of them may appear completely random, the game actually keeps a series of internal (and unseen) counters about events such as number of jumps, jumps over bubbles, bubble bursts, bubbles blown etc. during a round or in the whole game, maximum number of monsters blown in a certain round etc. and these events are actually used to determine which bonuses will appear, and to a certain extent when they will appear.


Virtually the entire game is controlled in this way, appearing to be random but actually able to be manipulated by the player should he or she know how. The only item that is known to be completely random is the "fireball bubble" that appears very occasionally, a red bubble with a flashing yellow spark inside it that gives the players fireballs for the next five levels. This is generated with a chance of 1 in 4096 each time a bubble drifts into the level from the top or bottom of the screen.


Some known events and the effect they have on bonuses are:


The number of distinct EXTEND bubbles that will appear on a round depend on the maximum number of monsters killed during the round, or on a previous round if said previous round didn't have "openings" for EXTEND bubbles to fly in, or was completed before they could appear. In general, killing N+1 monsters will make N distinct EXTEND bubbles appear. Since the game actually can have only 7 monsters per round, killing 7 monsters in a single bubble cluster will make all 6 EXTEND letters appear.


In Taito's PC port, however, killing N monsters will cause the N-th letter of the word to appear — making the N extremely hard to get because there's only few levels where you can easily pop five enemies simultaneously. This is probably a bug.


Another known event-triggered event is the appearance of candy cane bonuses: if a player rides a bubble more than 20 times, then a candy cane will surely appear in that round.


Other bonuses can be made to appear in similar manners, and there is at least one internet page listing some of the events and their effects [1].


For a special bonus on the NES version, a player must enter the password HIJID, select 2 player continue, and finish round FO (last level) with both players alive. After the entire ending has run and the player is prompted to press start, the player will receive a reward. The reward is a sound test for the whole game.


True Ending

The arcade original has several different ways in which the game can be finished. Completing the final round when playing in single-player mode, the game displays a message stating that the player hasn't reached the "true ending." The player is then warped back to a random level between 50 and 95 and carries on playing. In this way, a skilled player can make a single game last for a very long time.


Finishing round 100 with both players active displays the "happy ending," in which both of the players' girlfriends are rescued. But a cryptic message then appears stating that this is also not the "true ending", and displays a code that must be entered into the game at the title screen.


Entering the code changes the game logo to read Super Bubble Bobble, and the next game that is played has all the enemies switched around, making for a much more difficult game. Finishing the game with both players active in Super mode finally reveals the true ending of the game.


Cheat modes

Unusually, the arcade version also has two cheat modes built in. By entering certain combinations of movements and button presses on the title screen, these can be activated for the next game to be played.


The first cheat, Original Game, causes the secret treasure rooms on levels 20, 30 and 40 and the warp door on level 50 to appear every time, regardless of whether one of the players is still on their first life.


The second cheat, Power Up!, grants the players the training shoes (for extra speed) and the yellow and blue candy (for rapid-fire and fast moving bubbles, respectively) at all times, making the game significantly easier to play.


The Super Bubble Bobble mode detailed above is also entered in the same way as the cheat codes.


Moon Water storyline

In the original Game Boy version of Bubble Bobble, and Classic Bubble Bobble for the Game Boy Color, there is a storyline in which only Bub is involved in the gameplay.


Game Boy version

Bob (as a human) has an unknown sickness, so Bub (as a dragon for no given reason) has to pass through the hundred levels to defeat Super Drunk and get the Moon Water. Only defeating Super Drunk, however, results in a bad ending.
The (unnamed) "Cave of Monsters" in this version seems to really be an emptied well. To obtain the good ending (to make it fill up with Moon Water) Bub must obtain three "jewels" from fairies he can meet after defeating three bosses (giant versions of Coiley, Stoner and Incendo, none present in the arcade game). Doing this will set free a fourth fairy who will then, thanks to the "jewels", fill the well and revive nature (even though the story of the game didn't mention nature suffering until then). Bub (who returns human), Bob and their parents (who were never transformed) are seen in the ending but their girlfriends never appear in the game.
The revival of nature seems to be suggested also in the Master System port's ending (which otherwise only revolves around the girlfriends' kidnapping, dismissing the parents completely). The Game Boy ) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo[1], released in 1989 at US$109 ISBN 0-9643848-5-X. The Game Boy was the first successful handheld console, and was the predecessor of all other iterations of the Game Boy line. ...


Game Boy Color - Classic Bubble Bobble

In Classic Bubble Bobble for the Game Boy Color, Bob (as a bubble dragon for no given reason) has the unknown sickness. Bub has to go through a number of levels to gain the Moon Water; lesser than the arcade or Game Boy, etc versions, though the game contains many alternative paths and bosses that are giant versions of all common enemies, including those of the previous GB game who keep the same names (all bosses are named after fruits). The final boss is Darkness Drunk (the original Super Drunk appears in an earlier stage with the name Melon). The game is not set in a "Cave of Monsters" but in various different places (even on an airship).
The ending is Bub obtaining a bottle of Moon Water, and the screen fades to white and cuts to only a cute still picture of the Bubble Bobble characters (minus Bob). The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ...


Ports

The popularity of Bubble Bobble led Taito (or its licensees) to port to many home computers and video game consoles. Ports of the game were released for the Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Commodore Amiga, Atari ST, MSX, Amstrad CPC, Sharp X68000, PC (MS-DOS, 1989 and 1996), Apple II, FM Towns Marty, Sega Master System, Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Nintendo Entertainment System, Famicom Disk System, Sega Game Gear, mobile phone (Sprint PCS), and UltraCade's Taito Arcade Classics. A version also exists for the BBC Micro on public domain though never officially released. At the end of 2006 a new port for mobile phones in Europe and Japan was released. In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... A video game console is an interactive entertainment computer or electronic device that manipulates the video display signal of a display device (a television, monitor, etc. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... The FM Towns Marty console, which was released by Fujitsu in Japan in 1993. ... The Sega Master System (SMS for short) is an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Game Boy ) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo[1], released in 1989 at US$109 ISBN 0-9643848-5-X. The Game Boy was the first successful handheld console, and was the predecessor of all other iterations of the Game Boy line. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Manufacturer Nintendo Product family Nintendo DS Type Handheld game console Generation Seventh generation era First available NA November 21, 2004 JP December 2, 2004 AU February 24, 2005 EU March 11, 2005 ZH July 23, 2005 Connectivity Wi-Fi and Local Wireless Online service Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, LAN Units... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Famicom Disk System, attached to a late-model AV Famicom The Family Computer Disk System (FCD) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... This article is about the telecommunications company; see sprints for the running term. ... UltraCade Technologies, also known simply as UltraCade, is a computer and video game hardware company, founded in 1982 by David R. Foley and Roger Cross as HyperWare. ... The BBC Microcomputer System was a series of microcomputers and associated peripherals designed and built by Acorn Computers Ltd for the BBC Computer Literacy Project operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


In October 2005, a version was released for the Xbox, PlayStation 2, and PC as part of the Taito Legends compilation of classic arcade games. The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The PlayStation 2 , abbreviated PS2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Taito Legends is a compilation of 29 arcade games released for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, and PC in October 2005. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Recently, a version for the TI-83 graphing calculator was released. The TI-83 (original design) The TI-83 series of graphing calculators is manufactured by Texas Instruments. ... A typical graphing calculator. ...


Game mechanics in conversions and ports

Bubble Bobble has been widely regarded as one of the most playable games of all time[citation needed], owing much of its success to its previously described game mechanics, which are only apparently simple, and its many hidden features and secrets. Also, most Bubble Bobble players usually manage to master techniques such as riding bubbles, 'bubbling' oneself through the screen or 'kissing' monsters, and expect them to work all the time. Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ...


Some Bubble Bobble ports however, from the date of release of the arcade version up today, have been heavily criticized for their mechanics deviating significantly from the arcade version, adversely affecting the gameplay.


For example, in many versions of the game the two-digit trick to make extra bonuses appear at the end of the stage just doesn't work, or the score and bonus awarding system is entirely different, in part due to the complexity of the original one, and most of the aforementioned techniques can be much harder or impossible to reproduce, thus completely changing (arguably ruining) the gaming experience.


Examples include even comparatively recent versions such as the (1996) PC/PlayStation/Sega Saturn versions by Acclaim: they either have different game mechanics (too fast dropping speed, barely working shoes, bubbles going through walls, different jumping physics and many non-implemented techniques) or different behaviour for some monsters (especially the time-up monster). This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Another example is the early 1989 PC version by Novalogic, which had the possibility of diagonal jumps with a single keystroke (thus enabling players to go through walls), lacked completely the ability of kissing monsters, and had different rules governing the appearance of some bonuses (most notably the orange-yellow sweet). NovaLogic was a computer game software developer and publisher established in 1985 and based in Calabasas, California. ...


The various Nintendo NES and Game Boy ports and sequels are very different, often featuring scrolling screens, different enemies, and the ability for the dragons to fly.


In general, there are as many variations to the game mechanics as there are versions, with some being more faithful to the arcade version than others and some resulting in noticeably different gameplay experience. Although that is a general rule regarding ports of any game, in Bubble Bobble it can become very noticeable and annoying because of the game relying primarily on its fast paced and trick-filled gameplay.


One of the few versions having game mechanics and gameplay very close to the arcade is Final Bubble Bobble the Sega Master System version, this even though it introduced extra gameplay elements (in particular two new bosses like in the GB version and the need to obtain the content of certain secret rooms to reach the second set of 100 levels and then again to obtain the true ending). Moreover, the version included in Taito Legends for the Xbox, PS2, and PC should be a near-perfect copy of the original arcade version, as it features the original ROM running under emulation. However, even this version lacks accurate emulation of an MCU in the original hardware that handled monster behavior and other things. As of 2007, fully accurate emulation is implemented only in MAME (versions 0.107u3 and up).[3] The Sega Master System (SMS for short) is an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console that was manufactured by Sega. ... DosBox emulates the familiar command line interface of DOS. An emulator duplicates (provide an emulation of) the functions of one system with a different system, so that the second system behaves like (and appears to be) the first system. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with embedded microprocessor. ... MAME is an emulator application designed to recreate the hardware of arcade game systems in software, with the intent of preserving gaming history and preventing vintage games from being lost or forgotten. ...


Screenshots of different ports

Legacy

Rainbow Islands Insect Island boss.

Bubble Bobble inspired many sequels, including: Image File history File links Bossrainbow. ... Image File history File links Bossrainbow. ...

There are a couple of previous Taito games which sort of anticipated the Bubble Bobble legacy because of their inclusion of characteristic common elements or even monsters (e.g. the Mighta and Monsta both appeared first in the game Chack'n Pop, and in fact level 29 of Bubble Bobble is a direct copy of level 1 of Chack'n Pop) : Rainbow Islands is a 1987 arcade game from Taito. ... Rainbow Islands Extra Version is a 1988 arcade game from Taito. ... Parasol Stars is a video game by Taito released in 1991. ... Bubble Bobble Part 2 is a game in the Bubble Bobble series. ... Bubble Symphony is an arcade video game in the Bubble Bobble series also known as Bubble Bobble 2. ... “Bubble Bobble 2” redirects here. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... Bubble Memories is a video game by Taito released to arcades in 1995. ... Chackn Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, considered to be an ancestor of Bubble Bobble due to the appearance of many similar enemies and Bubble Bobbles duplication of a Chackn Pop level. ...

Bub and Bob also appeared in Puzzle Bobble, otherwise known as Bust a Move in the United States. Bust a Move was followed by many sequels, for many consoles, including PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, Wii, Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, Xbox and the N-Gage, along with computer and arcade versions. This spin-off franchise became more popular than Bubble Bobble itself, and has (so far) outlived it. Chackn Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, considered to be an ancestor of Bubble Bobble due to the appearance of many similar enemies and Bubble Bobbles duplication of a Chackn Pop level. ... The Fairyland Story is a classical arcade platform video game released by Taito in 1985 in its arcade form. ... Bust-a-Move redirects here. ... Bust-a-Move redirects here. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... This section needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The Game Boy ) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo[1], released in 1989 at US$109 ISBN 0-9643848-5-X. The Game Boy was the first successful handheld console, and was the predecessor of all other iterations of the Game Boy line. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nintendo GameCube , GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas final video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... The PlayStation 2 , abbreviated PS2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Similar games, spinoffs, and clones

Bubble Bobble's successful gameplay has inspired not only many official sequels and spinoffs by Taito, but also a number of games with very similar gameplay elements. The most important of them include:

  • The non-scrolling platformer action.
  • Dividing the game into many levels (typically above 30).
  • Defeating enemies by trapping them somehow instead of killing them right away.
  • Collecting bonuses and finding secret ways of increasing their value.
  • Collecting letters to gain an extra life.

Some examples of successful non-Taito video games resembling Bubble Bobble in some or even all of the above aspects are:

Rodland is a game which was released in Japan in April of 1990 by Jaleco. ... Jaleco (TYO: 7954 ) was founded as Japan Leisure Corporation on October 3rd 1974. ... Snow Brothers is a game released by Capcom for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Toaplan was a video game developer from Japan. ... Tumblepop is an arcade game platform game by Data East released in 1991. ... Data East (データイースト dēta īsuto) was a Japanese video game company, also known as DECO (Data East Corporation, データイースト株式会社 dēta īsuto kabushikigaisha). ...

Clones

A screenshot of Ultra Balloon by SunA, a game inspired by Bubble Symphony.

Ultra Balloon (1996), by SunA Corporation (also manufacturer of Hard Head series), is an evident Bubble Symphony copy and the only Bubble Bobble-inspired arcade game to actually copy the bubble-blowing and popping system. Image File history File links An Ultra Ballon (by SunA) screenshot, an obvious rip-off of Taitos Bubble Memories. ... Image File history File links An Ultra Ballon (by SunA) screenshot, an obvious rip-off of Taitos Bubble Memories. ... Hard Head and Hard Head 2 were two mid-80s arcade platform scrolling video games made by SunA corporation. ... “Bubble Bobble 2” redirects here. ...


Bubble Bobble also inspired a few software publishers to publish derivatives of the game for the PC and Mac. Such titles include Bubble Bobble World, Bubble Bobble Quest, Bubble Bobble Nostalgie, Bub & Bob, and The Bub's Brothers. Such games are marketed online. The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


Trivia

  • This was one of the first games to feature multiple endings.
  • In 1996, Taito announced that they lost the original source code program to Bubble Bobble following a reorganization - when it came to the recent ports and sequels, they had to work from program disassembly, playing the game and (mainly) the various home computer ports.
  • The game forbids the initials 'SEX' on the high score table. If you try, it gets changed it to 'H.!'. In Japan, the letter H is occasionally used as a slang term for perverts. (See ecchi.)
  • Tom Gault holds the official record for this game with a score of 5,823,600 points on March 4, 1988. [2]
  • The highest possible score is 9,999,990, at which point the score stops increasing.
  • The NES Cover band "The Advantage" covers two songs from "Bubble Bobble" on their self-titled album.
  • Games with an "improved", though actually slightly modified, arcade mode were released for the Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS, respectively called Bubble Bobble Old and New, in July 2002, and Bubble Bobble Revolution in September 2006.
    • Bubble Bobble Revolution was developed by Dreams Interactive. Wireless multiplayer functionality was included for the DS version.
    • However, in the beginning of October 2006, the game cartridge was officially deemed "faulty" by Nintendo of America due to the fact that the New Age mode did not have a boss in Round 30, so players could not advance to the next level.
  • A cameo of Bub is in the MMORPG MapleStory, in the games square in Henesys, there is a man who lets you play various games, and on the board he is holding, is an 8-bit Bub.

Multiple endings refer to a case in entertainment (usually video games) where the story could end in different ways, depending on the actions of the characters. ... Ecchi (from the Japanese エッチ etchi) is an English word deriving from a Japanese word meaning lewd or naughty when used as an adjective, and can refer to a pervert or sexual intercourse when used as a noun. ... The Advantage is an American indie rock band from Nevada City, CA that specialize in doing covers of music from old Nintendo games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Manufacturer Nintendo Product family Nintendo DS Type Handheld game console Generation Seventh generation era First available NA November 21, 2004 JP December 2, 2004 AU February 24, 2005 EU March 11, 2005 ZH July 23, 2005 Connectivity Wi-Fi and Local Wireless Online service Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, LAN Units... July 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December // See also: Timeline of the War in Afghanistan (July 2002) A Russian Tupolev Tu-154 airliner and a Boeing 757 operated by DHL collide at 35,000ft over Uberlingen, due to failure of correct communication from... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... September 2006 is the ninth month of 2006 and has begun on a Friday. ... October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... This article is about the original game for Windows. ...

References

  1. ^ NES manual for Bubble Bobble
  2. ^ SNES version of Puzzle Bobble, VS CPU mode
  3. ^ Nicola Salmoria's blog entry documenting the final reverse engineering of the Bubble Bobble MCU

Bust-a-Move redirects here. ...

External links

The following three links may have unverifiable information, such as Super Drunk/Grumple Gromit being called by fans as Hyper Drunk, when in actuality, Hyper Drunk is Bubble Symphony's villain (fans name this character Sorcerer Drunk). Also, in Puzzle Bobble 2, players can not select characters (that was introduced in the VS Computer mode in PB3.)
  • BubandBob.com through the Internet Archive Wayback Machine
    • Last best version (before the upgrade to Apache server), also through the Wayback Machine
  • Bubble Bobble HQ - Taito.Overclocked.org also through the Wayback Machine
  • Bubble Bobble at the Killer List of Videogames
  • Bubble Bobble Series at the Open Directory Project
  • Bubble Trouble A detailed analysis of the arcade version, as published in Retro Gamer magazine.
  • Bubble Bobble Video Game Vault A brief video look back on Bubble Bobble for the NES.
  • Amiga longplay of Bubble Bobble - At Recorded Amiga Games.
  • Bubble Bobble level guide including video walkthroughs, information and strategy for all 100 levels of the arcade version.
  • Bubble Bobble PCB at PCBdB*

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bubble Bobble - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4124 words)
Bubbles containing flames that, when the bubble is popped, drop downwards setting any surface they touch on fire for a short time, killing any monsters that touch the flame and turning them into 9000-point red diamonds.
Bubbling oneself through means "riding a bubble" through the opening at the top of a stage or even just through the ceiling of a stage in order to appear at the lower part, like some flying monsters can do.
Bubble Bobble has been widely regarded as one of the most playable games of all time, owing much of its success to its previously described game mechanics, which are only apparently simple, and its many hidden features and secrets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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