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Encyclopedia > Brythonic

Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). It is known loosely as P-Celtic for the way it uses p for an old *kw in Proto_Indo_European; however, this nomenclature usually implies an acceptance of the P_Celtic hypothesis rather than the Insular Celtic hypothesis (for a discussion, see Celtic languages).


The living Brythonic languages are Breton, Welsh, and Cornish; also notable are Cumbric (now extinct), Westcountry Brythonic or Old Devonian (extinct), Ivernic (also extinct) and probably the extinct Pictish (although the late Kenneth H. Jackson argued during the 1950s, from some of the few remaining examples of Pictish that Pictish was a non-Indo-European language, the majority of modern Pictish scholars do not agree). Once, Brythonic languages encompassed most of Great Britain and Ireland – though in Ireland it was replaced with Goidelic when Gaels invaded sometime between 500 and 100 BC, but they were driven to the fringes of Britain by the invasions of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes which brought English to Britain. Brythonic languages then disappeared from Scotland after Irish colonists brought a Goidelic language with them from their home island.






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Brythonic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (917 words)
The modern Brythonic languages all derive from a common ancestral language termed British, Common Brythonic, Old Brythonic or Proto-Brythonic, which is thought to have developed from the Proto-Celtic language which was introduced to Britain from the middle second millennium BC (Hawkes, 1973).
Brythonic languages were then spoken at least in the whole of Great Britain south of the rivers Forth and Clyde, presumably also including the Isle of Man.
The Brythonic languages spoken in Scotland, the Isle of Man and England were displaced at the same time by Goidelic and Old English speaking invaders.
Encyclopedia4U - Brythonic - Encyclopedia Article (211 words)
Brythonic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic).
The main living Brythonic languages are Breton and Welsh; other notable tongues are Cornish (which has no native speakers, but is being resurrected), and perhaps the extinct Pictish (although Kenneth H. Jackson has argued from the few remaining examples of Pictish that Pictish was a non-Indo-European language).
Once, Brythonic languages encompassed most of Great Britain (though not Ireland), but they were driven to the fringes of that island by the invasions of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes which brought English to Britain.
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