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Encyclopedia > Brynhildr
Sigurd and Brynhild's funeral
Volsung Cycle
Volsunga saga
Poetic Edda
Norna-Gests þáttr
Þiðrekssaga
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Related
Nibelungenlied
Hagbard and Signy

In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. She is a main character in the Völsunga saga and some Eddic poems treating the same events. Under the name Brünnhilde she appears in the Nibelungenlied and therefore also in Richard Wagner's opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen. Brynhildr is probably inspired by the Visigothic princess Brunhilda of Austrasia, married with the Merovingian king Sigebert I in 567. The history of Brynhildr includes fratricide, a long battle between brothers, and dealings with the Huns. File links The following pages link to this file: Brynhildr User:Wiglaf Categories: Author died more than 50 years ago public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Brynhildr User:Wiglaf Categories: Author died more than 50 years ago public domain images ... Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. ... The Volsung Cycle is the name of a series of Germanic legends based on the same matter as Niebelungenlied, and which were recorded in medieval Iceland. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The death of Nornagest, by Gunnar Vidar Forssell Norna-Gests þáttr or the Story of Norna-Gest is a legendary saga about the Norse hero Norna-Gest. ... Þiðrekssaga (also Thidreksaga, Thidrekssaga, Niflungasaga or Vilkina saga) is a saga of the adventures of the hero Dietrich von Bern, believed to be based on the historical Theodoric the Great, and written down about 1250. ... In Norse mythology, Andvarinaut was a magical ring, first owned by Andvari. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ... In Norse mythology, Andvari was a dwarf. ... In Norse mythology, Hreidmar was the avaricious king of the dwarf folk, who captured three gods with his unbreakable chains. ... OTR and Otr may refer to: Off-the-record messaging, an instant messenger encryption technology Ótr, a dwarf in Norse mythology Off The Record (TV series), A Canadian sports talk show Off-Topic Republic, a sect of the Toolkitzone. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Volsung was murdered by the Geatish king Siggeir and avenged by one of his sons, Sigmund. ... This article is about the mythological hero Sigmund, for other meanings see: Sigmund (disambiguation). ... Signy and Hagbard Signy is the name of two heroines in two legends from Scandinavian mythology which were very popular in medieval Scandinavia. ... Odin taking the dead Sinfjötli to Valhalla Sinfjötli (Old Norse) or Fitela (Anglo-Saxon) was born out of the incestuous relationship between Sigmund and his sister Signy. ... Helgi Hundingsbane/Hundingsbani was a hero in the Norse sagas. ... Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. ... In Norse mythology, Brünnehilde was a shieldmaiden and a Valkyrie. ... Gudrun and Sigurd In Norse mythology, Gudrun, who is called Kriemhild in the Nibelungenlied, was the sister of Gunnar. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Gunnar is the most attractive and unreservedly admired of Icelandic saga heroes,a man of heroism, energy, virtue, and --- above all --- unswerving loyalty to the land of his birth and love for its overpowering physical beauty Tricked by his enemies into disobeying the warnings of his prescient friend Njáll... Götaland, Gothia, Gothland [1], Gotland (AHD), Gautland or Geatland, is a historical land of Sweden, and was a separate kingdom, before Sweden was unified. ... Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Signhild Hagbard and Signy (Signe) (the Viking Age) or Habor and Sign(h)ild (the Middle Ages and later) were a pair of lovers in Scandinavian mythology and folklore whose legend was widely popular. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Hervor dying after the battle with the Huns. ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... The Ramsund carving depicting the Saga of the Völsungs The Volsunga saga is a late 13th century Icelandic prose rendition of the story of Sigurd and Brynhild, and the destruction of the Burgundians. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Valkyrie Warrior Maiden by artist Arthur Rackham (1912) Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly translated into English as The Ring of the Nibelung or The Nibelungs Ring, is a series of four epic music dramas based loosely on figures and elements of Germanic paganism, particularly from the Icelanders sagas and... The Visigoths, originally Tervingi, or Vesi (the noble ones), one of the two main branches of the Goths (of which the Ostrogothi were the other), were one of the loosely-termed Germanic peoples that disturbed the late Roman Empire. ... Brunhilda (in German) or Brunehaut (in French) (534-613) was a Frankish queen who ruled the East Frankish kingdoms of Austrasia and Burgundy in the names of her sons and grandsons. ... There are other articles with similar names; see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Sigebert I (535-575) was a Frankish King, one of the sons of Clotaire I and Ingund. ... Events Livva I succeeds Athanagild as king of the Visigoths. ... The Huns were a confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ...

Contents

In Norse myth

According to the Völungasaga, Brynhildr is the daughter of Budli. She was ordered to decide a fight between two kings: Hjalmgunnar and Agnar. The valkyrie knew that Odin himself preferred the older king, Hjalmgunnar, yet Brynhildr decided the battle for Agnar. For this Odin condemned the valkyrie to live the life of a mortal woman, and imprisoned her in a remote castle behind a wall of shields on top of mount Hindarfjall in the Alps, and cursed her to sleep until any man would rescue and marry her. The hero Sigurðr Sigmundson (Siegfried in the Nibelungenlied), heir to the clan of Völsung and slayer of the dragon Fafnir, entered the castle and awoke Brynhildr by removing her helmet and cutting off her chainmail armour. He immediately fell in love with the shieldmaiden and proposed to her with the magic ring Andvarinaut. Promising to return and make Brynhildr his bride, Sigurðr then left the castle and headed for the court of Gjuki, the king of Burgundy.[1] Budli is the name of one or two legendary kings from the Scandinavian Legendary sagas. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Sigurd (Old Norse: Sigurðr, German: Siegfried) was a legendary hero of Norse mythology, as well as the central character in the Völsunga saga. ... This article is about the mythological hero Sigmund, for other meanings see: Sigmund (disambiguation). ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Volsung was the father of Sigmund. ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... In Norse mythology, Andvarinaut was a magical ring, first owned by Andvari. ... Gjúki is the king of the Burgundians in the eddic poem Atlakvida, and he was the father of Gunnar (see Gunther). ... région of Bourgogne, see Bourgogne. ...


Gjuki's wife, the sorceress Grimhild, wanting Sigurðr married to her daughter Gudrun (Kriemhild in Nibelungenlied), prepared a magic potion that made Sigurðr forget about Brynhildr. Sigurðr soon married Gudrun. Hearing of Sigurðr's encounter with the valkyrie, Grimhild decided to make Brynhildr the wife of her son Gunnar (Gunther in the Nibelungenlied). Gunnar then sought to court Brynhild but was stopped by a ring of fire around the castle. He tried to ride through the flames with his own horse and then with Sigurðr's horse, Grani, but still failed. Sigurðr then exchanged shapes with him and entered the ring of fire. Sigurðr (disguised as Gunnar) and Brynhildr married, and they stayed there three nights, but Sigurðr laid his sword between them (meaning that he did not take her virginity before giving her to the real Gunnar). Sigurðr also took the ring Andvarinaut from her finger and later gave it to Gudrun. Gunnar and Sigurðr soon returned to their true forms, with Brynhildr thinking she married Gunnar. However, Gudrun and Brynhild later quarreled over whose husband was greater, Brynhildr boasting that even Sigurðr was not brave enough to ride through the flames. Gudrun revealed that it was actually Sigurðr who rode through the ring of fire, and Brynhildr became enraged. Sigurðr, remembering the truth, tried to console her, but to no avail. Brynhildr plotted revenge by urging Gunnar to kill Sigurðr, telling him that he slept with her in Hidarfjall, which he swore not to do. Gunnar and his brother Hogni (Hagen in the Nibelungenlied) were afraid to kill him themselves, as they had sworn oaths of brotherhood to Sigurðr. They incited their younger brother, Gutthorm to kill Sigurðr, by giving him a magic potion that enraged him, and he mudered Sigurðr in his sleep. Dying, Sigurðr threw his sword at Gutthorm, killing him. [2](some Eddic poems say Gutthorm killed him in the forest south of the Rhine, also while resting)[3]. Brynhildr herself killed Sigurðr's three-year-old son, and then she willed herself to die. When Sigurðr's funeral pyre was aflame, she threw herself upon it – thus they passed on together to the realm of Hel. [4] This article should be merged with Kriemhild In Norse mythology, Grimhild was the witch who cast a spell on Sigurd making him leave his wife, Brünnehilde, for Gudrun. ... Gudrun and Sigurd In Norse mythology, Gudrun, who is called Kriemhild in the Nibelungenlied, was the sister of Gunnar. ... This article should be merged with Grimhild In the medieval Nibelungenlied, Kriemhild is one of four children of Uote. ... Gunnar is the most attractive and unreservedly admired of Icelandic saga heroes,a man of heroism, energy, virtue, and --- above all --- unswerving loyalty to the land of his birth and love for its overpowering physical beauty Tricked by his enemies into disobeying the warnings of his prescient friend Njáll... ΑÖÖÖÜđiÔ:For the character of the sitcom Friends see here. ... Grani is a mythical eight-legged horse that appears in Norse mythology. ... For the Högni of the Heimskringla and the legends of Helge Hundingsbane, see Högne. ... Hagen is the 37th largest city in Germany, located in the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ... Loreley At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (Dutch Rijn, French Rhin, German Rhein, Italian: Reno, Romansch: Rein, ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ...


However, in some Eddic poems such as Sigurðarkviða hin skamma, Gunnar and Sigurðr lay siege to the castle of Atli, Brynhildr's brother. Atli offers his sister's hand in exchange for a truce, which Gunnar accepts. However, Brynhildr has sworn to marry only Sigurðr, so she is deceived into believing that Gunnar is actually Sigurðr. [5] The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems from the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ... Attila the Hun (405–453), also sometimes known with the nickname as Attila the Scourge of God (Flagellum Dei) or simply Attila was the most powerful king of the Huns. ...

Brynhild's hell-ride by Jenny Nyström.
Brynhild's hell-ride by Jenny Nyström.

According to the Völsunga saga, Brynhildr bore Sigurðr a daughter, Aslaug, who later married Ragnar Lodbrok. Image File history File links Ed0039. ... Image File history File links Ed0039. ... Jenny Nyström (born 1854, Kalmar, Sweden; died 1946, Stockholm) was an artist and illustrator of childrens books. ... Aslaug, Asl g, Kraka or Kr ka, was a queen of Scandinavian mythology who appears in Snorris Edda, the V lsunga saga and the saga of Ragnar Lodbrok. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the Eddic poem Helreið Brynhildar (Bryndhildr's ride to Hel), Brynhildr on her journey to Hel encounters a gýgr (giantess) who blames her for an immoral livelihood. Brynhildr responds to her accusations: Sigurd and Brynhilds funeral In Norse mythology, Brynhildr was a shieldmaiden and a valkyrie. ... The giants Fafner and Fasolt seize Freyja in Arthur Rackhams illustration to Richard Wagners version of the Norse myths. ...

“Munu við ofstríð
alls til lengi
konur ok karlar
kvikvir fæðask;
við skulum okkrum
aldri slíta
Sigurðr saman.
Sökkstu, gýgjar kyn.”
[1]
“Ever with grief
and all too long
Are men and women
born in the world;
But yet we shall live
our lives together,
Sigurth and I.
Sink down, Giantess!”
—Bellows translation

In Nibelungenlied

In the Nibelungenlied, Brünnhilde is instead the queen of Isenland (Iceland). Gunther here overpowers her in three warlike games with the help of Siegfried – equipped with an invisibility cloak. Firstly, Brünnhilde throws a spear that three men only barely can lift towards Gunther, but the invisible Siegfried diverts it. Secondly, she throws twelve fathoms a boulder that requires the strength of twelve men to lift. Lastly, she leaps over the same boulder. Gunther, however, defeats her with Siegfried's help also in these games, and takes her as his wife. The Nibelungenlied is an epic poem in Middle High German. ...


The Nibelungenlied also differs from Scandinavian sources in its silence on Brünnhilde's fate; she fails to kill herself at Siegfied's funeral, and presumably survives Kriemhild and her brothers.


In Wagner's "Ring" cycle

Though the cycle of four operas is titled Der Ring des Nibelungen, Richard Wagner in fact took Brünnhilde's role from the Norse sagas rather than from the Nibelungenlied. Brünnhilde appears in the latter three operas (Die Walküre, Siegfried, and Götterdämmerung), playing a central role in the overall story of Wotan's downfall. Valkyrie Warrior Maiden by artist Arthur Rackham (1912) Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly translated into English as The Ring of the Nibelung or The Nibelungs Ring, is a series of four epic music dramas based loosely on figures and elements of Germanic paganism, particularly from the Icelanders sagas and... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... Siegfried could refer to: The opera by Richard Wagner; see Siegfried (opera). ...   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... For other meanings of Odin and Wotan see Odin (disambiguation) Odin (Old Norse Óðinn, Swedish Oden) is usually considered the supreme god of Germanic and Norse mythology. ...


In Wagner's tale, Brünnhilde is one of Valkyries; but the latter are formed out of a union between Wotan and Erde, a personification of the earth. in Die Walküre Wotan initially commissions her to protect Sigmund, his son by a mortal mother. When Fricka protests and forces Wotan to have Sigmund die, Brünnhilde disobeys her father's change of orders and takes away Sigmund's wife (and sister) Siglinde and the shards of Sigmund's sword Nothung. She manages to hide them but must then face the wrath of her father, who is eventually persuaded to seal her in a ring of fire to await awakening by a hero who does not know fear. Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... This article is about the mythological hero Sigmund, for other meanings see: Sigmund (disambiguation). ... Location of Bardejov District in the Nitra region Frička is a village and municipality in Bardejov District in the PreÅ¡ov Region of north-east Slovakia. ... Illustration by Alan Lee In Norse mythology, Gram was the name of the sword that Sigurd (Siegfried) used to kill the dragon Fafnir. ...

Siegfried awakens Brünnhilde in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Wagner's version of the story.
Siegfried awakens Brünnhilde in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Wagner's version of the story.

Brünnhilde does not appear again until near the end of the third act of Siegfried. The title character is the son of Sigmund and Siglinde, born after Sigmund's death and raised by the dwarf Mime, the brother of Alberich who stole the gold and fashioned the ring around which the operas are centered. Having himself taken the ring from the giant-turned-dragon Fafner, Siegfried is guided to Brünnhilde's rock, where he awakens her. Download high resolution version (594x941, 145 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (594x941, 145 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific British book illustrator. ... Siegfried could refer to: The opera by Richard Wagner; see Siegfried (opera). ... Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) is an Internet Standard that extends the format of e-mail to support text in character sets other than US-ASCII, non-text attachments, multi-part message bodies, and header information in non-ASCII character sets. ... Factoring via Network-Enabled Recursion (FAFNER) was a 1995 project trying to solve the RSA-130 factoring problem. ...


Siegfried and Brünnhilde appear again at the beginning of Götterdämmerung, at which point he gives her the ring and they are separated. Here again Wagner chooses to follow the Norse story, though with substantial modifications. Siegfried does go to Gunther's Hall, where he is given a potion to cause him to forget Brünnhilde so that Gunther may marry her. All this occurs at the instigation of Hagen, Alberich's son and Gunther's half-brother. The plan is successful, and Siegfried leads Gunther to Brünnhilde's rock. In the meantime she has been visited by her sister valkyrie Waltraute, who warns her of Wotan's plans for self-immolation and urges her to give up the ring. Brünnhilde refuses, only to be overpowered by Siegfried who, disguised as Gunther, takes the ring from her by force.   (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...


As Siegfried goes to marry Gutrune, Gunther's sister, Brünnhilde sees that he has the ring and denounces him for his treachery. Still rejected, she joins Gunther and Hagan in a plot to murder Siegfried, telling Hagen that Siegfried can only be attacked from the back. So Gunther and Hagen take Siegfried on a hunting trip, in the course of which Hagen stabs Siegfried in the back with a spear. Upon their return, Brünnhilde takes charge, and has a pyre built in which she is to perish, cleansing the ring of its curse and returning it to the Rhinemaidens. Her pyre becomes the signal by which Valhalla also perishes in flame.


In popular culture

  • In the 2005 TV epic Ring of the Nibelungs, Norwegian-American actress Kristanna Loken played Brunhild, the Queen of Iceland and the mightiest woman in the world, who was based on the legendary Valkyrie.
  • In season 6 of the popular TV series Xena: Warrior Princess, the character Brunhilda was played by Brittney Powell in three feature episodes: The Rheingold, The Ring and The Return of the Valkyrie.
  • In the classic Warner Bros. cartoon What's Opera, Doc?, Bugs Bunny impersonates Brunnhilde to trick Elmer Fudd.
  • In anime Fafner of the Azure, Brunhilde was name of system with Tsubaki Minashiro serving as its core, located in Valkyrie cave, capable of completely controlling an island. Her older brother Soushi Minashiro operated Siegfried system, used to link Fafner mecha pilots brains directly forming single team to protect the island.

Kristanna Sommer Loken or Kristanna Sommer Løken (born October 8, 1979) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Xena. ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations, with varied meanings that evolved from one to another. ... Bugs loses his headgear in Whats Opera, Doc? Whats Opera, Doc? is a short animated cartoon directed by Chuck Jones in which Elmer Fudd chases Bugs Bunny through a six-minute operatic parody of Wagners operas, particularly Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung). ... Bugs Bunny is an Academy Award-winning street-smart anthropomorphic gray rabbit who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Elmer Fudd The fictional cartoon character Elmer J. Fudd, now one of the most famous Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies characters, also has one of the more convoluted and disputed origins in the Warner Brothers cartoon pantheon (second only to Bugs Bunny himself). ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... Fafner of the Azure: Dead Aggressor (蒼穹のファフナー: Dead Aggressor Sōkyū no Fafner: Dead Aggressor) is a 25-episode anime series produced by Xebec where much of the world had been destroyed by beings known as Festum. ... The Valkyries Vigil, by the Pre-Raphaelite painter Edward Robert Hughes. ... Siegfried could refer to: The opera by Richard Wagner; see Siegfried (opera). ... Factoring via Network-Enabled Recursion (FAFNER) was a 1995 project trying to solve the RSA-130 factoring problem. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ...

Other names

  • Brünhild
  • Brunhild
  • Brunhilda
  • Brunhilde
  • Brunhilt
  • Brunnehilde
  • Brünnhilde
  • Brynhild
  • Brynhilt
  • Bruennhilde

References

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Brunhild
  1. ^ Byock, Jesse L. The Saga of the Volsungs. London: Penguin, 1990. ISBN 0-14-044738-5.
  2. ^ Byock
  3. ^ "Gudrunarkviða I" in Bellows, Henry Adams. (Trans.). (1923). The Poetic Edda: Translated from the Icelandic with an Introduction and Notes. New York: American-Scandinavian Foundation. Reprinted Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellon Press. ISBN 0-88946-783-8. (Available at Sacred Texts: Sagas and Legends: The Poetic Edda. An HTML version transcribed with new annotations by Ari Odhinnsen is available at Northvegr: Lore: Poetic Edda - Bellows Trans..)
  4. ^ Byock
  5. ^ Bellows
Norse mythology
List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns | Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freyja | Loki | Balder | Týr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök
Sources: Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle | Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society: Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers
The nine worlds of Norse mythology | People, places and things

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brynhildr - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (617 words)
Brynhildr is probably inspired by the Visigothic princess Brunhilda of Austrasia, marrid with the Merovingian king Sigebert I in 567.
According to the Völungasaga, Brynhildr is the daughter of Budli.
Brynhildr responds to her accusations, claiming that men have not understood the hardship of her fate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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