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Encyclopedia > Bryn Mawr College

Bryn Mawr College

Motto Veritatem Dilexi (I Have Loved Truth)
Established 1885
Type Private
Endowment US $600+ million[citation needed]
President Nancy J. Vickers (will retire in June 2008)
Faculty 144
Undergraduates 1,378
Postgraduates 421
Location Bryn Mawr
Lower Merion Twp
, PA, USA
Campus Suburban
Colors Yellow and White
Mascot Owl
Website brynmawr.edu

Bryn Mawr College (pronounced brin mauer) is a highly selective women's liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... One million (1,000,000), or one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999,999 and preceding 1,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Nancy J. Vickers is the president of Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania a position she has held since 1997. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Bryn Mawr is in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and Delaware County, Pennsylvania, just west of Philadelphia, along U.S. Highway Route 30 (Lancaster Avenue). ... Lower Merion Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and part of the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Bryn Mawr is in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and Delaware County, Pennsylvania, just west of Philadelphia, along U.S. Highway Route 30 (Lancaster Avenue). ... Lower Merion Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and part of the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


The College is known for its academics, exceptionally close relationship between students and faculty, and sense of community and shared values. Bryn Mawr College is one of the nation's premier liberal arts colleges. In terms of academics, percent doctorates earned by graduates, placement among select professional schools, student satisfaction/quality of life, and social impact on America according to US News, Princeton Review, NSF data, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Monthly, Bryn Mawr has consistently ranked in the top 20 of liberal arts colleges in America, and sometimes, among undergraduate institutions (including universities) as well. The Washington Monthly also ranked Bryn Mawr College as #1 college in America based on social mobility, fostering scientific and humanistic research, and how well it promotes an ethic of service to country. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... NSF is an abbreviation. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ...


Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with two other colleges founded by QuakersSwarthmore College and Haverford College. The school has an enrollment of about 1300 undergraduate students and 400 graduate students. The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... The Tri-College Consortium consists of three Pennsylvania Main Line private liberal arts colleges: Haverford College, Swarthmore College and Bryn Mawr College. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The name "Bryn Mawr" means "big hill" in Welsh (not "high hill," Bryn Uchel, as is often mistakenly given as the translation). Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...

Contents

Academics

Students at Bryn Mawr are required to complete divisional requirements in the social sciences, natural sciences (including lab skills) and humanities. In addition, they must fulfill a two-year foreign language requirement, a quantitative skills requirement and a College Seminar requirement. The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ...

Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For the magazine about archaeology, see Archaeology (magazine). ... Comparative literature (sometimes abbreviated Comp. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... East Asia Geographic East Asia. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... This article is an overview of the history of art worldwide. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family, comprising all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... The term Spanish literature refers to literature written in the Spanish language, including literature composed in Spanish by writers not necessarily from Spain. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Film theory seeks to develop concise, systematic concepts that apply to the study of film/cinema as art. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... Peace and conflict studies can be defined as the inter-disciplinary inquiry into war as human condition and peace as human potential, as an alternative to the traditional Polemology (War Studies) and the strategies taught at Military academies. ...

History

Bryn Mawr College was founded in 1885, founded largely through the bequest of Joseph W. Taylor. It was the first higher education institution to offer graduate degrees, including doctorates, to women. The first class included 36 undergraduate women and eight graduate students. Bryn Mawr was originally affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), but by 1893 had become non-denominational.[1] A committee has been assembled to select a new president.[2] 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... “Quaker” redirects here. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Notable alumnae and faculty

A number of Bryn Mawr alumnae have gone on to become notable in their respective fields. The list includes Drew Gilpin Faust , the first woman president of Harvard University, modernist poets H.D. and Marianne Moore, the classics scholar Edith Hamilton, Nobel Peace Prize winner Emily Greene Balch, and the actress Katharine Hepburn. Notable faculty include Woodrow Wilson, Thomas Hunt Morgan and Richmond Lattimore. The following is a list of individuals associated with Bryn Mawr College through attending as a student, or serving as a member of the faculty or staff. ... Catharine Drew Gilpin Faust (born September 18, 1947[1]) is an American historian and academic administrator, currently dean of Harvards Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and president-elect of Harvard University. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... H.D. in the mid 1910s Hilda Doolitle(September 10, 1886, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States – September 27, 1961, Zürich, Switzerland), prominently known only by her initials H.D., was an American poet, novelist and memoirist. ... Marianne Moore photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marianne Moore (December 11, 1887 - February 5, 1972) was a Modernist American poet and writer. ... Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 - May 31, 1963) was a classicist and educator before she became a writer on mythology. ... Emily Greene Balch (January 8, 1867 – January 9, 1961) was an American academic, writer, and pacifist who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 (the prize that year was shared with John Mott), notably for her work with the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom. ... It has been suggested that Tom Hepburn be merged into this article or section. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Thomas Hunt Morgan (September 25, 1866 – December 4, 1945) was an American geneticist and embryologist. ... Richmond Alexander Lattimore (May 6, 1906 - February 26, 1984) was an American poet and translator known for his translations of the Greek classics, especially his versions of the Iliad and Odyssey, still considered superior despite their age. ...


Organization

Bryn Mawr undergraduates largely govern themselves in academic and social matters. Their Self-Government Association, formed in 1892, is the oldest such organization in the United States. A significant aspect of self-government is the Academic Honor System (honor code). 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ...


Along with Haverford College, Bryn Mawr forms the Bi-College Community. Students in the "Bi-Co" enjoy unlimited cross-registration privileges and may choose to major at the other institution. The two institutions join with Swarthmore College to form the Tri-College Consortium, opening the Swarthmore course catalog to interested Bryn Mawr students as well. Free shuttles are provided between the three campuses. There is the Blue Bus between Bryn Mawr and Haverford College, and a van, known to the students as the "Swat Van", that goes between the three colleges. Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ...


In addition, the group is affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania through a special association known as the Quaker Consortium, allowing Bryn Mawr students to take classes there. Additionally, Bryn Mawr students in the Growth and Structure of Cities department may earn a Bachelor of Arts at Bryn Mawr and a master's degree in city planning at Penn through the 3-2 Program in City and Regional Planning. This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Quaker Consortium is an arrangement between three liberal arts colleges and one research university in the greater Philadelphia area that allows for their students to enroll in courses at the other schools of the Consortium. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ...


Facilities

Bryn Mawr's Pembroke Hall
Bryn Mawr's Pembroke Hall

Bryn Mawr's library holdings are housed in the Mariam Coffin Canaday Library (opened 1970), the Rhys Carpenter Library (opened 1997), and the Lois and Reginald Collier Science Library (opened 1993). TRIPOD, the online library catalog, automatically accesses holdings at Haverford and Swarthmore. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


The majority of Bryn Mawr students live on campus in residence halls. Many of the older residence halls are known for their Gothic revival architecture, modeled after Oxford University. Each is named after a county town in Wales: Brecon, Denbigh (1891), Merion (1885), and Radnor (1887). The exceptions are Pembroke East and West (1892), named for the House of Pembroke and its importance to William Shakespeare, (although Pembrokeshire is also a county in Wales). Rhoads North and South was named after the college's first president, James E. Rhoads; Rockefeller is named after its donor, John D. Rockefeller. The newest residence halls are Erdman (opened 1965, designed by architect Louis Kahn) and the Haffner Language and Culture House (opened 1971). In addition, students may choose to live in Glenmede (formerly graduate student housing), Perry House (the Black Cultural Center) or Batten House (an environmentally-friendly co-op). Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... This article is about building architecture. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the country. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... This is about a town in Wales. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Merion is a community in Pennsylvania state of the United States. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New Radnor is a village in mid Wales. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Earldom of Pembroke, associated with Pembroke Castle in Wales, was created by King Stephen of England. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Pembrokeshire (Welsh: ) is a county in the southwest of Wales in the United Kingdom. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901/1902 – March 17, 1974) was a world-renowned architect who practiced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


The campus was designed in part by noted landscape designers Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted, and has subsequently been designated an arboretum (the Bryn Mawr Campus Arboretum). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was an American landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Bryn Mawr Campus Arboretum (135 acres) is an arboretum located across the campus of Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. ...


Architecture and Significant Places

Blanca Noel Taft Memorial Garden

In 1908, John C. Olmsted designed a private garden for M. Carey Thomas adjoining the Deanery. Today this garden is modified and renamed the Blanca Noel Taft Memorial Garden. It was designed as a small, serene enclosure with two wall fountains, one with a small basin and the other with a sunken reflecting pool, another smaller reflecting pool, as well as a statuary based on designs Thomas and Garrett had seen in Italy. The decorative wall tiles were purchased from Syria.[2] John Charles Olmsted (1852-1920) United States, son of Frederick Law Olmsted, was a landscape architect. ... M(artha) Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857-December 2, 1935) was the president of Bryn Mawr College and an ardent suffragist. ...


Erdman Hall Dormitory

In 1960, architect Louis I. Kahn and Bryn Mawr College president, Katharine McBride, came together to create one of this century’s great buildings, the Erdman Hall dormitory. For over a year, Kahn and his assistants struggled to translate the college’s design program of 130 student rooms and public spaces into a scheme (well documented by the letters written between McBride and Kahn). The building comprises three geometrical square structures, connected at their corners. The outer walls are formed by interlocking student rooms around three inner public spaces: the entry hall, dining hall and living hall. These spaces receive light from towering light monitors. It is rumored among students that Kahn wanted to construct a building that would promote studying rather than socializing. Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901 - March 17, 1974) practised as an architect in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and taught architecture there and at Yale. ... Geometry (from the Greek words Ge = earth and metro = measure) is the branch of mathematics first introduced by Theaetetus dealing with spatial relationships. ...


The Marjorie Walter Goodhart Theater

The Marjorie Walter Goodhart Theater houses a vaulted auditorium designed by Arthur Meigs, two smaller spaces that are ideal for intimate performances by visiting artists, practice rooms for student musicians, and the Office for the Arts. The building's towers and gables, friezes, carvings and ornamental ironwork were designed by Samuel Yellin in the gothic revival style.[3] [4] An auditorium is the area within a theatre, concert hall or other performance space where the audience is located in order to hear and watch the performance. ... gables may refer to: Gable (architecture) Coral Gables, Florida This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Frieze of the Tower of the Winds. ... Samuel Yellin (1885 -1940) Samuel Yellin, 1927 Biography American blacksmith, born in Galicia Poland where, at the age of eleven he was apprenticed to an iron master. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


M. Carey Thomas Library

Great Hall
Great Hall
Cloisters
Cloisters

Named after Bryn Mawr's first Dean and second president, the M. Carey Thomas Library is no longer a library. Today, it is a space for performances, readings, lectures, public gatherings and was once the home of the Athena statue (which was damaged in 1997) which is now located in a high alcove in the Rhys Carpenter Art and Archaeology Library. The Great Hall (formerly the reading room of the old Library) features a cathedral ceiling painted with geometric Renaissance patterns and tall, lead-paned windows, which flood the space with light. This area was renovated and conserved by Voith & Mactavish Architects LLP.[5] M. Carey Thomas Library encloses a large open courtyard called "The Cloisters", which is the site of the College's traditional Lantern Night Ceremony. The cremated remains of M. Carey Thomas are in the courtyard cloister. Alumna Katharine Hepburn used to go skinny dipping in the Cloisters fountain, a fact confirmed by the source in her 1985 graduation address. A popular tradition is for undergraduates to do the same before graduating and conveniently the fountain contains chlorinated water. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A Cloister is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ... Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ... It has been suggested that Tom Hepburn be merged into this article or section. ... Skinny dipping, or skinny-dipping is swimming naked. ... For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... Chlorination is the process of adding the element chlorine to water to make it fit for human consumption (potable) or to water intended for swimming or bathing in order to keep it from spreading disease. ...

Rhys Carpenter Art and Archaeology Library

Named for Bryn Mawr’s late professor of Classical Archaeology, the Rhys Carpenter Library was designed by Henry Myerberg of New York and opened in 1997. The space is attached to the rear of the M. Carey Thomas Library. The entrance is a four story atrium. Names of art and archaeology faculty are on the main wall with a frieze of plaster casts from ancient Halicarnassus. Most of the stacks, study areas, lecture halls and seminar rooms were built underground. The roof comprises a wide grassy area used for outdoor concerts and picnics. The building won a 2001 Award of Excellence for Library Architecture from the Library Administration and Management Association and the American Institute of Architects. Carpenter Library also houses the College's renowned collections in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, History of Art and Classics [6]. The building also contains a large lecture hall and a seminar room.[7][8] For the magazine about archaeology, see Archaeology (magazine). ... Looking up inside the 32-story atrium of the Shanghai Grand Hyatt, part of the Jin Mao Building. ... Frieze of the Tower of the Winds. ... Map of the Aegean Sea, showing the location of Halicarnassus (modern Bodrum, Turkey) Halicarnassus (; modern Bodrum; see also List of traditional Greek place names), an ancient Greek city on the southwest coast of Caria, Asia Minor, on a picturesque and advantageous site on the Ceramic Gulf (Gulf of Cos, Gulf...


Traditions

May Day at Bryn Mawr College
May Day at Bryn Mawr College

The four major traditions are Parade Night, which takes place on the first night of the academic year; Lantern Night, which takes place in late October or early November; Hell Week, which takes place in mid-February; and May Day, which takes place on the Sunday after classes end in the spring semester. Step sings, when students bring their class lanterns and congregate at Taylor Hall, singing songs such as "Bread and Roses", occur around these events as well. ImageMetadata File history File links Summary This is a photo from May, 2003. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Summary This is a photo from May, 2003. ... For the band, see Bread and Roses (band). ...


The two traditions mistresses of the College, elected by the student body, are in charge of organizing and running traditions.


In addition to events, Bryn Mawr's traditions extend to superstitions around the campus, some of which date back to the opening of the college in 1885.[9] 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Parade Night

On the first night of classes, first year students are gathered near the main entrance to the college. The remainder of the college community gathers, by class, lining the sides of the road leading to the steps of Taylor Hall. The Freshwomen must run through the road first pelted by water balloons by the Sophomore class, then showered with candy by the Junior class as the Senior class looks on. Exploding water ballon Several water balloons lying on pavement A water balloon, or water bomb, is a simple small latex rubber balloon filled with tap water. ...


Older parade nights (until the 60s or 70s) were quite different. There was a large bonfire built on Merion Green and a parade led by the local firemen's band that led to the bonfire. Freshwomen joined hands in circles around the bonfire and the Sophomores tried to break through these circles. Part of the older Parade Night ceremony has survived to date. Each Freshwoman class writes a Parade Night Song, which the Sophomores attempt to steal a copy of so that they can write a Parade Night Parody. The songs are sung on the steps of Taylor Hall after the "Parade" in a Step Sing.[10] For the AC/DC box set, see Bonfire (album) For the German band called Bonfire, see Bonfire (band) A bonfire (commonly mispronounced bombfire) is a large controlled outdoor fire made from bales of straw or wood. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...


Lantern Night

Dressed in traditional, black, academic robes, Freshwomen are given lanterns from the upperclasswomen in their class color symbolically representing the light of knowledge being passed from one class to another. The color of the lantern's panes are the same as the previous year's departing class, either red, dark blue, green or light blue or the McBride scholar color of purple. During this intricate ceremony, Sophomores hand out the lanterns while the Juniors and Seniors lead the singing of college hymns in Greek. The tradition concludes with a Step Sing on the Taylor Hall steps.[11] Academic dress or academical dress (also known in the United States as academic regalia) is traditional clothing worn specifically in academic settings. ...


Hell Week

Hell Week occurs in mid-February, about a month after students return from winter break. It serves as a way to break the monotony in the time between winter and spring breaks. Freshwomen are put through academic and social paces by gentle "hazing" conducted by the Sophomore class. Freshwoman often perform random or ridiculous tasks, such as asking silly questions in class, reciting poetry extolling the virtues of the Sophomore class in public, or performing on a stage erected in the main dining hall. Juniors attempt to provide relief for the Freshwomen by giving them gifts or providing them "safe havens".[12]


May Day

Bryn Mawr College now celebrates May Day on the first Sunday following the end of classes. Somewhat akin to a mini renaissance festival, it is a day long celebration in which students and faculty participate. The students dress in white and begin the day by feasting on strawberries and cream. Students then perform in a myriad of traditional parades, plays, and concerts including various cultural dancing display such as May-Pole and Scottish Country dancing. Like Lantern Night and Parade Night, May Day ends in a Step Sing and then is concluded with the traditional showing of "The Philadelphia Story," starring Alumna Katharine Hepburn.[13] May Day is May 1, and refers to any of several holidays celebrated on this day. ... An actress playing the role of Mary Queen of Scots in 2003. ... Strawberries Promo Strawberries is an album by The Damned released October 1982 on Bronze Records (catalogue #BRON 542). ... Cans of cream. ... Marines on parade A parade is an organized procession of people along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by decorated vehicles called floats or sometimes large lighter-than-air balloons with complex shapes. ... A play (noun) is a common literary form, usually consisting chiefly of dialog between characters, and usually intended for performance rather than reading. ... A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ... Scottish country dancing at the 2005 Skagit Valley Highland Games in Mount Vernon, Washington Scottish country dancing, SCD or reeling is a form of social dance involving groups of mixed couples of dancers tracing progressive patterns according to a predetermined choreography. ... The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... It has been suggested that Tom Hepburn be merged into this article or section. ...


References

  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas. New York: Knopf, 1994.
  • ---. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).
  • This collage is referenced in the long running cartoon The Simpsons. Edna Krabappel, Bart's school teacher, is said to have a degree from Bryn Mawr.

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Ms. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ A Brief History of Bryn Mawr College In 1912, Bryn Mawr became the first college in the United States to offer doctorates in social work, through the Department of Social Economy and Social Research. This department became the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research in 1970. In 1931, Bryn Mawr began accepting men as graduate students, while remaining women-only at the undergraduate level. In the sense in which the set of Seven Sister colleges have sometimes been thought of as paralleling the seven once-all-male Ivy League schools, Bryn Mawr was considered the sister school of either Princeton or the University of Pennsylvania.

    College presidents

    Vickers has announced that she will retire in June 2008.<ref>[http://www.collegenews.org/x6635.xml Bryn Mawr President to Retire]</li> <li id="_note-1">'''[[#_ref-1|^]]''' http://www.brynmawr.edu/prezsearch/</li></ol></ref> 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... M(artha) Carey Thomas (January 2, 1857-December 2, 1935) was the president of Bryn Mawr College and an ardent suffragist. ... Harris Llewellyn Wofford (born April 9, 1926) was an American politician who served as a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania from 1991 to 1995. ... Mary Patterson McPherson is President Emeritus of Bryn Mawr College and Vice President of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. ... Nancy J. Vickers is the president of Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania a position she has held since 1997. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bryn Mawr College - College Closeup (1717 words)
Bryn Mawr women are leaders in the classroom, in the studio, in the laboratory, and on the field.
Bryn Mawr alumnae are physicians, economists, entrepreneurs, scholars, filmmakers, journalists, jurists, writers, and scientists whose achievements are marked by originality of thought and direction.
Bryn Mawr’s prestigious almnae include the first woman to be President of Harvard University, one of the first women to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, the first woman neurosurgeon, and the first and only woman to receive four Academy Awards.
Bryn Mawr College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (975 words)
Bryn Mawr is located on the Pennsylvania Main Line and is connected to downtown Philadelphia by the SEPTA R5 commuter rail system.
Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sisters and is part of the Tri-College Consortium along with Swarthmore College and Haverford College.
Bryn Mawr's library holdings are housed in the Mariam Coffin Canaday Library (opened 1970), the Rhys Carpenter Library (opened 1997), and the Lois and Reginald Collier Science Library (opened 1993).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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